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10 Signs You're Gluten Intolerant By Dr. Amy Myers

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10 Signs You're Gluten Intolerant

More then 55 diseases have been linked to gluten, the protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. It’s estimated that 99% of the people who have either gluten intolerance or celiac disease are never diagnosed.

It is also estimated that as much as 15% of the US population is gluten intolerant. Could you be one of them?

If you have any of the following symptoms it could be a sign that you have gluten intolerance:

1. Digestive issues such as gas, bloating, diarrhea and even constipation. I see the constipation particularly in children after eating gluten.
 
2. Keratosis Pilaris, (also known as ‘chicken skin’ on the back of your arms). This tends be as a result of a fatty acid deficiency and vitamin A deficiency secondary to fat-malabsorption caused by gluten damaging the gut.
 
3. Fatigue, brain fog or feeling tired after eating a meal that contains gluten.
 
4. Diagnosis of an autoimmune disease such as Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, Rheumatoid arthritis, Ulcerative colitis, Lupus, Psoriasis, Scleroderma or Multiple sclerosis.

5. Neurologic symptoms such as dizziness or feeling of being off balance.
 
6. Hormone imbalances such as PMS, PCOS or unexplained infertility.
 
 
8. Diagnosis of chronic fatigue or fibromyalgia. These diagnoses simply indicate your conventional doctor cannot pin point the cause of your fatigue or pain.
 
9. Inflammation, swelling or pain in your joints such as fingers, knees or hips.
 
10. Mood issues such as anxiety, depression, mood swings and ADD.
by on Feb. 5, 2013 at 12:24 PM
Replies (61-61):
JWu
by on Feb. 8, 2013 at 10:15 AM

The Celiac/Gluten Intolerance issue is a huge one. I did not realize how horrible I had been feeling my entire life until I did a no carb diet for weight loss. I thought the marked improvement that I felt (I described it as feeling better than I had ever in my life) was from the 30 pound weight loss even though I was still heavier than my best weight. It was not until after I begain reintegrating whole grains into my diet that I was really starting to feel awful. The joint and muscle pain, headaches, fatigue, skin rashes/buring sensation, and major GI discomfort was unbelieveable. It took sometime for me to get to a specialist who tested me for Celiacs. Her first explanation was that the blood test was horribly inaccurate and does not catch everyone. Mine came back negative. Later I met a woman in pharmacy and she saw the rashes/acne on my cheeks and asked if I had Celiac. Her daughter had been diagnosed with it and her skin looked like mine until she went gluten free. I explained that I tested negative but I still talked to my dr about the elimination diet. After three weeks the rashes cleared, my skin didn't burn anymore and the GI discomfort that I had attibuted to coffee disappeared. The tough part is protecting yourself from cross contamination and hidden sources of gluten (soy sauce, spice rubs, etc). I have been 100% gluten free now for 2-1/2 years. Everyone around me can literally see if I get exposed to gluten...the face rashes reappear and I just seem off to everyone. I grew up with a host of issues and all of those have resolved since going gluten free. I have often said that it could be GMO wheat (perhaps the structure has been changed too quickly for me to adapt) or maybe even the remnants of an insect that lives in wheat fields (like allergy to dust mites is the feces not the actual mite). Regardless, I have tried the elimination diet three different times over the past 7 years and every time it comes back to gluten products have an adverse effect for me. I think it is really important for people to keep an open mind. Some of our research has not caught up with what people are finding on their own. I am a nurse and I truly believe in evidence based research...but our medical field must be able to want to do the research. At this point, there has not been enough of the scientific community interested in getting to the bottom of this phenomenon.

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