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Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

What Black History Are We Teaching the Next Generation of Black Americans?

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by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 12:55 PM
Replies (11-20):
JoshRachelsMAMA
by JRM on Feb. 6, 2013 at 7:14 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting krysstizzle:

That's one theory. Or, trying to have discusions centered around race in this forum is like a nightmarish ride on a sick and twisted merry go round full of screeching harpies from every side. No intricacies and subtleties are allowed, everything always gets pushed to one extreme or the other, everyone is told that their personal experiences are made up, and all reasoned argument (from both sides) gets lost in the madness of lunacy of extremism.

It's infuriating and exhausting, frankly. 

Quoting JoshRachelsMAMA:


Quoting Radarma:

How sad that this post gets so little attention.

Not controversial enough for them. Truth can't be argued with. (At least intelligently)


THAT was sexy...........comehere gimme a kisss;)

....I am only responsible for what I say,NOT for what you understand.....
FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Feb. 6, 2013 at 7:25 PM

I see many valid points the man made.

I also heard that, while he wants people to take personal responsibility, he is also placing blame else where.

Radarma
by "OneDar" on Feb. 6, 2013 at 7:47 PM
Quoting FromAtoZ:

I see many valid points the man made.

I also heard that, while he wants people to take personal responsibility, he is also placing blame else where.




How so?
krysstizzle
by DeepThought on Feb. 6, 2013 at 8:05 PM
1 mom liked this

*smooooch* :)

Quoting JoshRachelsMAMA:


Quoting krysstizzle:

That's one theory. Or, trying to have discusions centered around race in this forum is like a nightmarish ride on a sick and twisted merry go round full of screeching harpies from every side. No intricacies and subtleties are allowed, everything always gets pushed to one extreme or the other, everyone is told that their personal experiences are made up, and all reasoned argument (from both sides) gets lost in the madness of lunacy of extremism.

It's infuriating and exhausting, frankly. 

Quoting JoshRachelsMAMA:


Quoting Radarma:

How sad that this post gets so little attention.

Not controversial enough for them. Truth can't be argued with. (At least intelligently)


THAT was sexy...........comehere gimme a kisss;)


Radarma
by "OneDar" on Feb. 6, 2013 at 9:12 PM

 BUMP.

Where are all the race martyrs who want to call ppl like ME, who are WHITE, "racists!" for bringing attention the very things this man talks about????

 

Radarma
by "OneDar" on Feb. 6, 2013 at 9:14 PM

 http://www.yourblackworld.net/2012/12/black-news/yvette-carnell-5-reasons-why-the-african-american-community-is-still-failing/

1. We don’t like each other.black_church1

It’s true. Face it. Black people don’t like each other, at least not enough to do business with one another or support each other in any meaningful or consistent way. “But we were each other’s rock during the Civil Rights movement” you say. Yeah. That was a long time ago. Think we still have that strong Jim Crow bond?

Here’s a little test: Send an email to 20 of your closest friends and family members telling them you’re starting a business and are looking to raise $1,000 from each of them, and watch them run.

Everybody loves supporting black business until it actually costs them something. When your black enterprise costs other black people money, then all bets are off. Excuses like-  “It’s a recession”, “You’re in my prayers,” and “Isn’t there venture capital for this sort of thing?”  - will begin to roll off their selfish tongues like water.  But they all got the new iPhone 5s. Trust.

And after you’re finished with that, throw on a hip hop song, and tell me how many verses it takes you to get to the part where the  black rapper spits about bustin’ a cap into another black man’s head. Don’t worry… I’ll wait.

2. We’re too d@mn sensitive

We need collective therapy. Don’t believe me? Click on any article where a white person is being accused of racism, and read all the rants from black people in the comments section. You’ll quickly note how many blacks are  just frothing at the mouth, all because some random white  knucklehead said something racist.

God forbid anyone says anything  which could be considered disrespectful of Obama, because then all h*ll breaks loose. Point being, we’re too racially aroused, which allows other people to enrage us at the mere mention of anything which could be perceived as racist. And so leaders, both black and white, keep manipulating and distracting us with fake controversies that don’t matter, in hopes  that we’ll lose sight of what actually does matter.  And you know what? It works every time. We’re predictable as h*ll.

I read Ted Nugent’s racist rants because it’s funny to watch someone so stupid make an azz of himself on Twitter. But he doesn’t upset me, and why should he, when nothing he does or says impacts my life? But most black people lose their sh*t over a white rocker who can’t possibly have an IQ over 70. Makes zero sense.

3. We can’t handle the truth

Some of you are reading this right now thinking, “who is she to tell me what I should be doing, what does she know?”  I know that the unemployment rate for African Africans is double that of whites, and higher than Asians and … wait for it… Latinos. The folks who just crossed the Mexican border are kicking our azzes, what does that tell you?

No, it’s not all our fault, and we could use some substantive policy solutions from Washington D.C., but Capitol Hill doesn’t give a sh*t about us. Barack Obama doesn’t give a sh*t about us. We were not brought to these American shores with an expectation that we’d actually survive. That is our legacy. And when Paco and Jose are doing better in America than we are, we have a problem, and there’s no explaining that away. We can’t do everything, but we can do a heck of a lot better if we’re willing to face the truth.

4. We Don’t Dream Big

We’re so happy surviving, keeping the rent paid and the kids fed, that we have no idea what it means to actually thrive. Ask five random black people how they’re doing, and I guarantee you that at least two of them will answer with a heavy sigh, and then add,  “I’m makin’ it” or some equivalent of that phrase.  Makin’ it is all some of us do. It’s all many of us focus on. But what is there beyond makin’ it? Can’t we ever venture into the territory of big dreams, dreams so big that they make us quiver inside? Are we so defeated that we’re afraid of ever dreaming again?

5. We’re Christians

If your religion is making you more amiable, more successful, and more accepting of others, then keep it. It’s good for you. But if  your religion is the reason for your stupid decisions, like continuing to flock to a church where the “Bishop” is accused of having s*x with boys, or has been charged with embezzlement or securities fraud, then you should quit your church, and maybe even your religion.

If your religion has you focused on something which never impacts your everyday life, like gay marriage, but ignores crime and poverty in the African-American community, then maybe you’re not smart enough for religion. Maybe you should just try to be a good person on your own. Start small.

If your church has you aligned with right wingers, then that’s a clear sign that you’re failing at Christianity. If your religion had you lined up at Chick-fil-A to buy salt saturated chicken sandwiches, then you should quit religion. You’re too gullible.

All I’m saying is that Christianity has a sad legacy of convincing African-Americans  that they are to be rewarded for their  long-suffering, so while others get their rewards here and now, we wait for death.  And while others actually take action to help themselves and their community, we offer empty prayers. That’s not #winning. That was a trick of slavemasters, one we still traffic in, to our own detriment.

Radarma
by "OneDar" on Feb. 6, 2013 at 9:16 PM

 Crickets, fucking crickets.

futureshock
by Ruby Member on Feb. 6, 2013 at 9:40 PM
2 moms liked this


Quoting MeAndTommyLee:

Excellent video!  Very candid.  Half way through it,  I started wondering what kind of legacy the last two generations of blacks had to impress on their children, until I realized that it's  sadly been oppression, desperation, violence and negative sexuality.

Unfortunately there are segments of the white and Hispanic populations who are emulating this downward spiral as well.

krysstizzle
by DeepThought on Feb. 6, 2013 at 9:50 PM


Quoting futureshock:


Quoting MeAndTommyLee:

Excellent video!  Very candid.  Half way through it,  I started wondering what kind of legacy the last two generations of blacks had to impress on their children, until I realized that it's  sadly been oppression, desperation, violence and negative sexuality.

Unfortunately there are segments of the white and Hispanic populations who are emulating this downward spiral as well.

I think socioeconomic status and education would be a better factor to investigate.

Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Feb. 6, 2013 at 10:07 PM
1 mom liked this

I liked it. Thanks for posting.


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