Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Chicago police no longer responding to all 911 calls

Posted by   + Show Post

Chicago police no longer responding to all 911 calls

 Chicago police: Chicago police watch as demonstrators attend the National Nurses United Chicago Rally protesting the G8 and Global One Percent. IMAGE

To free up more officers to deal with the most serious crimes, 911 dispatchers will no longer send officers to attend calls deemed less pressing.

 

Chicago police are no longer responding in person to 911 calls reporting vehicle theft, garage burglary or simple assault in a change aimed at freeing up officers to deal with more serious crimes.

According to a report in the Chicago Sun-Times, the change came into effect on Sunday and also covers crime where the victim is "safe, secure and not in need of medical attention" and the offender is "not on the scene and not expected to return immediately."

Chicago authorities are hoping the change frees up more officers to attend to the most serious crimes, such as serious assaults and murders.

Instead of sending officers, 911 dispatchers have been told to transfer the calls to the Chicago Police Department’s Alternate Response Section, which is staffed by officers on light duty.

In 2012, the Alternate Response Section dealt with 74,000 reports. Victims of crime had the choice of filing a report over the phone or requesting that an officer attend in person when one was available. That number of reports is expected to double, but the choice of asking for an officer to attend will no longer be available.

The change is expected to free up the equivalent of 44 officers a day.

Dispatchers have reportedly been told to transfer calls if "the offender is gone, not expected to 'return immediately' and an officer is not needed for a prompt investigation; an officer on the scene would 'not result in an immediate arrest'; and the victim is safe, secure and not in need of medical attention."

The Sun-Times goes on to quote Chicago Deputy Chief-of-Patrol Steve Georgas, who said police forces throughout the United States are looking for ways to become more efficient.

"This is just a little piece that we think is going to help us in keeping cops up and free for patrol work. I don’t think we're looking for huge gains. It's probably only going to equate to 40 to 45 officers a watch," he said.

Georgas added that he did not think the change will be difficult for residents to get used to.

"It's a traumatic thing being the victim of a crime. This will be a little more convenient for them as well," he said. "They're still getting police service from a sworn police officer. But it's over the phone, and it's only in certain situations. Those officers are trained in what to ask. If certain things come up, they'll be able to transfer that back over to dispatch, and we'll immediately send an officer out."

However, some Chicago aldermen suggested the changes will prove difficult to accept for crime victims.

"I can understand if it's [to report] somebody spray-painted my trash can. But people want to see an officer when it gets up to a certain level of crime. They're setting the bar pretty high for police not to respond," said Alderman Scott Waguespack.

"When you're talking about someone's garage being broken into and you've had three or four neighbors with the same thing, people have an expectation of having an officer on location to assess the situation," he said. "If no officer shows up, they're going to assume it's going to keep happening. They'll feel this is scaling back even more. There'll be a lot of people angry."

source

by on Feb. 7, 2013 at 7:36 AM
Replies (11-20):
rfurlongg
by on Feb. 7, 2013 at 8:55 AM
I agree.

Quoting PinkButterfly66:

People shouldn't be calling 911 for non-emergencies anyway.  For non-emergencies they should call the police station directly.  

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Kitschy
by on Feb. 7, 2013 at 8:56 AM
Good. I'm not in cook county anymore but I always feel bad when an officer is dispatched and it wasn't necessary. If you call nonemergengy police for something like a car accident with no injuries, they tell you to call 911.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
rfurlongg
by on Feb. 7, 2013 at 8:57 AM
That is a good pt. Perhaps that is how Chicago defines it as well.

Quoting lizzielouaf:

An example of simple assault, in my state, would be if my neighbor comes onto my property and says "the next time I see you I'm gonna beat the crap out of you" then leaves. I'm in no immediate danger but I have been threatened and am fearful of the next time I see him.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
lizzielouaf
by Gold Member on Feb. 7, 2013 at 9:00 AM
Ya I have no idea why someone would be upset by this measure. Lots of towns and cities already do this.


Quoting PinkButterfly66:

People shouldn't be calling 911 for non-emergencies anyway.  For non-emergencies they should call the police station directly.  


Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
mikiemom
by Ruby Member on Feb. 7, 2013 at 9:06 AM
1 mom liked this

I think folks who call 911 for non-emergencies should be charged with a crime as they are wasting valuable resources.

SpnFulOfSugar
by on Feb. 7, 2013 at 9:15 AM
Depends on your insurance. Our homeowners would of covered that but they would have required a police report.


Quoting lga1965:

 This article did not say that they won't respond to ALL 911 calls. The title of this thread is skewed and inaccurate.


One example of a minor incident was "a garage being broken into". I can understand that. My garage was broken into and my lawnmower was stolen. I didn't call 911! What the heck good would that do? LOL. I would only be venting , wasting their time and you can bet my lawnmower would never be found. People call 911 for stupid reasons all the time. The police do need to concentrate on serious 911 calls. But they have a huge responsibility to decide which are the serious crimes.


I see a trend  (actually a fad)....Chicago bashing. Too many posts bashing Chicago.


Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
lga1965
by on Feb. 7, 2013 at 9:19 AM
Would have .....

Quoting SpnFulOfSugar:

Depends on your insurance. Our homeowners would of covered that but they would have required a police report.




Quoting lga1965:

 This article did not say that they won't respond to ALL 911 calls. The title of this thread is skewed and inaccurate.



One example of a minor incident was "a garage being broken into". I can understand that. My garage was broken into and my lawnmower was stolen. I didn't call 911! What the heck good would that do? LOL. I would only be venting , wasting their time and you can bet my lawnmower would never be found. People call 911 for stupid reasons all the time. The police do need to concentrate on serious 911 calls. But they have a huge responsibility to decide which are the serious crimes.



I see a trend  (actually a fad)....Chicago bashing. Too many posts bashing Chicago.


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
lizzielouaf
by Gold Member on Feb. 7, 2013 at 9:22 AM
1 mom liked this
You would still get a police report without calling 911. Police officers would still respond it just wouldn't be within the confines of an emergency. You're not in immediate danger unless you believe the theif was still in your garage.


Quoting SpnFulOfSugar:

Depends on your insurance. Our homeowners would of covered that but they would have required a police report.




Quoting lga1965:

 This article did not say that they won't respond to ALL 911 calls. The title of this thread is skewed and inaccurate.



One example of a minor incident was "a garage being broken into". I can understand that. My garage was broken into and my lawnmower was stolen. I didn't call 911! What the heck good would that do? LOL. I would only be venting , wasting their time and you can bet my lawnmower would never be found. People call 911 for stupid reasons all the time. The police do need to concentrate on serious 911 calls. But they have a huge responsibility to decide which are the serious crimes.



I see a trend  (actually a fad)....Chicago bashing. Too many posts bashing Chicago.



Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
GrannyM.
by Bronze Member on Feb. 7, 2013 at 9:30 AM
1 mom liked this

Chicago police are no longer responding in person to 911 calls reporting vehicle theft, garage burglary or simple assault in a change aimed at freeing up officers to deal with more serious crimes.

According to a report in the Chicago Sun-Times, the change came into effect on Sunday and also covers crime where the victim is "safe, secure and not in need of medical attention" and the offender is "not on the scene and not expected to return immediately."

"Chicago authorities are hoping the change frees up more officers to attend to the most serious crimes, such as serious assaults and murders.

Instead of sending officers, 911 dispatchers have been told to transfer the calls to the Chicago Police Department’s Alternate Response Section, which is staffed by officers on light duty."

viv212
by Gold Member on Feb. 7, 2013 at 9:36 AM
Police already respond to life threatening situations and the non-life threatening situations wait until an officer is available. That's what I learned in AJ anyway.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN