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Protesters gather outside LAPD Headquarters to protest departmental corruption, mishandling of Dorner case.

Protest outside LAPD headquarters

Dozens of protesters gathered outside the Los Angeles Police Department headquarters downtown Saturday afternoon, holding signs of support for Christopher Dorner, the fired police officer suspected of killing four people.

Those gathered said they were protesting police corruption and the way the massive manhunt for Dorner was conducted. Authorities said Dorner appears to have died from a self-inflected gunshot wound after a shootout with police in Big Bear on Tuesday, ending a deadly rampage that stretched across Southern California.

Protesters said they believed Dorner’s claims that he was unfairly fired from the department in 2009 – grievances described in a lengthy online manifesto that has been attributed to him. Dorner also claimed that he was the victim of racism.

Protesters also said they were appalled by police mistakenly shooting at passengers in two separate trucks in Torrance, wrongly believing Dorner might be in the vehicles. One woman was shot in the back and is still recovering.

The protesters emphasized that they did not condone the killings of which Dorner is accused.

Michael Nam, 30, stood at the corner of 1st and Main Streets with a sign, painted by his girlfriend, showing a tombstone and the words “RIP Habeas Corpus.” The tombstone was engulfed in flames.

Nam, of Lomita, said he was disturbed by the burning of a mountain cabin near Big Bear where Dorner barricaded himself with a high-powered sniper rifle, smoke bombs and a cache of ammo. The blaze started shortly after police fired "pyrotechnic" tear gas into the cabin; the canisters are known as "burners" because the intense heat they emit often causes a fire.

But authorities have maintained that the fire was not intentionally set. 

Dorner, whose charred body was found in the cabin, appears to have died of a single gunshot wound to the head, authorities said.

“How the police handled this -– they were the judge, the jury and the executioner,” Nam said. “As an American citizen, you have the right to a trial and due process by law.”

Nam, a former Marine and a current member of the Army National Guard, said he has combat experience from deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan.

He said he has been in situations in which a combatant has been barricaded and successfully waited until the person surrendered, eventually getting “tired and coming out on their own.”

Nam said it was “pretty obvious” police wanted Dorner dead. “What I saw was a complete disregard for the Bill of Rights,” Nam said.

San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon, during a news conference Friday, defended the tactics used by his agency in the shootout at the mountain cabin, which left one of his deputies dead and another seriously wounded.

“The bottom line is the deputy sheriffs of this department, and the law enforcement officers from the surrounding area, did an outstanding job,” he said. “They ran into the line of fire.”


Protesters on Saturday said they organized the event through a Facebook page called “I support Christopher Jordan Dorner.” The Facebook post announcing the protest tells attendees to “keep it PEACEFUL” and to bring recording equipment.

The Facebook page states: “This is not a page about supporting the killing of innocent people. It’s supporting fighting back against corrupt cops and bringing to light what they do.”

As the protesters stood Saturday, drivers passing by honked, waved and gave thumbs up. A handful of officers watched from police headquarters across the street.

Nam said he spoke to the officers before the protest began about what the protesters should do to keep the event peaceful. He said the officers were respectful.

The protesters marched around the block, circling an intersection near the department headquarters. They chanted, “LAPD, you are guilty.”

Signs expressed anger at police and support for Dorner.

“If you’re not enraged, you’re not paying attention,” one sign read.

“Why couldn’t we hear his side?”

“Clear his name! Christopher Dorner”

Liliana Alaniz, 40, came with her family -– her mother, sister, nieces and daughters -– from Long Beach to join the protest, which she said was her first.

“I really, really believe he was innocent in the firing case,” Alaniz said of Dorner.

Alaniz held a sign that read, “Trying to clear your name.”

Her daughter, Andrea Tovar, said Dorner “has his supporters.”

“Murder is never right, but neither is the law when it’s unjust,” said Tovar, 18. She said police need to know they “can’t get away with everything.”

Article

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If they enforced bank regulations like they do park rules, we wouldn't be in this mess

by on Feb. 17, 2013 at 1:26 PM
Replies (21-30):
brookiecookie87
by Platinum Member on Feb. 17, 2013 at 9:51 PM


Except no one is making excuses for him. No one is saying he did the right thing. Everyone in fact is saying the opposite. That the killings were wrong.

I was pointing out the narrative you were painting of him as a cold blooded killer is wrong. A cold blooded killer would have killed all the innocent civilians and would still be out there. It was the fact that he wasn't a cold blooded killer that made him not harm any of the civilians he ran into and is the reason he was caught.

I didn't say the mission he was on justified the killings of the people he ALLEGEDLY killed. Just that it was part of his mission (If he did kill them) and that the fact that he let all the civilians go unharmed paints a completely different picture than a cold blooded killer.


Quoting soonergirl980:


The excuses that people like you are making for him is down right appalling. The same people calling me and other gun owners "gun nuts" who don't care about the lives of the victims are now throwing out bullshit excuses to explain away this mans behavior. hes not a cold blooded killer because he was on a "mission". I'm sure his victims who were INNOCENT thought he was a sweetheart right before he ripped the life out of them.

Quoting brookiecookie87:


You say he was shot in the head. Other people would disagree. There was a deputy that reported he shot him in the head.

https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=330938277023308&id=149828588467612&comment_id=27749822&offset=0&total_comments=112

It's not a, "we will never know" situation. They -thought- they found him twice and both times shot at the trucks without even confirming if it was really him. That means even if he tried to turn himself in. He would have been shot in his truck.

Have you seen the interviews of the hostages he took? None of them had anything bad to say about him. All of them are accommodated in some way. Whether it is letting them go safely, letting them take their dog, leaving their phone next to them so they can get help after they escape.

If he killed all these people as a cold blooded killer would do-He would still be free. But he didn't. Like any officer or soldier who kills during their mission they are doing what they think are right. That is what Christopher Dorner was doing. And clearly he was wrong to kill the people he did. But if he was a disgusting cold blooded killer he would have killed those hostages/people he ran into. And he would probably still be out there today.

Quoting soonergirl980:

I care about him shooting himself in the head as much as I care about Adam Lanza shooting himself in the head. They are both disgusting cold blooded killers. They both could have given themselves up but they did. You can say well they would have killed him anyway but we will never know because he took his own like to make himself the martyr you are making him out to be.







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If they enforced bank regulations like they do park rules, we wouldn't be in this mess

gdiamante
by Silver Member on Feb. 17, 2013 at 10:01 PM


Quoting brookiecookie87:

Oh-I wasn't implying Christopher Dorner was some hero who they should have let run free. He allegedly killed people and needed to be caught to be put on trial and face his punishment. I was just pointing out that they didn't even try to arrest him. And every action they did showed us they had no intention of arresting him.

From shooting at the two other trucks with innocent people inside to deploying -7- Burners to start the fire.

If Officers are heard saying they should burn him. And Police say on their scanners they are going to deploy 7 burners. And burners are known to start a fire (Only amplified by the fact that they used 7). It seems kind of silly to suggest they didn't intend for that fire to happen.

I would agree that he choose the wrong way to clear his name. But that doesn't mean the Police were right in attempting to kill him at every chance they got instead of arresting him.

And it doesn't change the fact that they highlighted the points he made in his manifesto. He said they don't care who they hurt if they "match" the description. Then they end up shooting at three people because they "matched" a description.

You said you lost all sympathy for Christopher Dorner when he killed someone. Are the Police (And their procedures) off the hook because they have bad aim and their 40+ shots didn't kill anyone? If the 71 year old lady they shot in the back during her newspaper delivery route dies will you also agree they were wrong?

Hell no, they're not off the hook. We all KNOW there are bad cops and stupid cops. And the more scared and emotional you get, the more stupid you get.

But I don't buy any of the thinking that this was a setup... the time to set up Chris Dorner was when he was fired in 2009, not now. 

He was discharged HONORABLY from the Navy the Friday before all this started. I think he was completely unprepared for that and went off the deep end.

brookiecookie87
by Platinum Member on Feb. 17, 2013 at 10:12 PM
1 mom liked this



Quoting gdiamante:


Quoting brookiecookie87:

Oh-I wasn't implying Christopher Dorner was some hero who they should have let run free. He allegedly killed people and needed to be caught to be put on trial and face his punishment. I was just pointing out that they didn't even try to arrest him. And every action they did showed us they had no intention of arresting him.

From shooting at the two other trucks with innocent people inside to deploying -7- Burners to start the fire.

If Officers are heard saying they should burn him. And Police say on their scanners they are going to deploy 7 burners. And burners are known to start a fire (Only amplified by the fact that they used 7). It seems kind of silly to suggest they didn't intend for that fire to happen.

I would agree that he choose the wrong way to clear his name. But that doesn't mean the Police were right in attempting to kill him at every chance they got instead of arresting him.

And it doesn't change the fact that they highlighted the points he made in his manifesto. He said they don't care who they hurt if they "match" the description. Then they end up shooting at three people because they "matched" a description.

You said you lost all sympathy for Christopher Dorner when he killed someone. Are the Police (And their procedures) off the hook because they have bad aim and their 40+ shots didn't kill anyone? If the 71 year old lady they shot in the back during her newspaper delivery route dies will you also agree they were wrong?

Hell no, they're not off the hook. We all KNOW there are bad cops and stupid cops. And the more scared and emotional you get, the more stupid you get.

But I don't buy any of the thinking that this was a setup... the time to set up Chris Dorner was when he was fired in 2009, not now. 

He was discharged HONORABLY from the Navy the Friday before all this started. I think he was completely unprepared for that and went off the deep end.

I don't believe he was "setup" either (If you are referring to the people who think he didn't kill anyone and they are just blaming him for those deaths). But I do believe in due process.

They should have at least attempted to arrest him instead of shooting at anything that looks like him. And then burning the cabin down that he was in.


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If they enforced bank regulations like they do park rules, we wouldn't be in this mess

gdiamante
by Silver Member on Feb. 17, 2013 at 10:24 PM

Hmm. Well I do know San Diego PD stopped someone who matched Dorner's description on the 7th, questioned him and let him go. Perhaps SDPD needs to train the other forces?

Perhaps a siege would have been better, but there was a lot of concern about darkness falling. It would have been very easy for him to get away.

He was a dead man one way or the other as soon as he killed the first person. As I noted earlier, the protest you shared here was pretty darned small for Los Angeles. I have to wonder whether people are more relieved that he's dead and we don't have to go through the time and expense of a trial, rather than being outraged over a lack of due process.

And perhaps we should be more concerned about that than anything else.

neveensaffron
by Member on Feb. 17, 2013 at 11:30 PM
I will bet my sons life that those cops were NOT "innocent".

He targeted those dead cops for a reason.




Quoting soonergirl980:


The excuses that people like you are making for him is down right appalling. The same people calling me and other gun owners "gun nuts" who don't care about the lives of the victims are now throwing out bullshit excuses to explain away this mans behavior. hes not a cold blooded killer because he was on a "mission". I'm sure his victims who were INNOCENT thought he was a sweetheart right before he ripped the life out of them.


Quoting brookiecookie87:


You say he was shot in the head. Other people would disagree. There was a deputy that reported he shot him in the head.

https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=330938277023308&id=149828588467612&comment_id=27749822&offset=0&total_comments=112

It's not a, "we will never know" situation. They -thought- they found him twice and both times shot at the trucks without even confirming if it was really him. That means even if he tried to turn himself in. He would have been shot in his truck.

Have you seen the interviews of the hostages he took? None of them had anything bad to say about him. All of them are accommodated in some way. Whether it is letting them go safely, letting them take their dog, leaving their phone next to them so they can get help after they escape.

If he killed all these people as a cold blooded killer would do-He would still be free. But he didn't. Like any officer or soldier who kills during their mission they are doing what they think are right. That is what Christopher Dorner was doing. And clearly he was wrong to kill the people he did. But if he was a disgusting cold blooded killer he would have killed those hostages/people he ran into. And he would probably still be out there today.


Quoting soonergirl980:

I care about him shooting himself in the head as much as I care about Adam Lanza shooting himself in the head. They are both disgusting cold blooded killers. They both could have given themselves up but they did. You can say well they would have killed him anyway but we will never know because he took his own like to make himself the martyr you are making him out to be.








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brookiecookie87
by Platinum Member on Feb. 18, 2013 at 12:10 AM
1 mom liked this



Quoting gdiamante:

Hmm. Well I do know San Diego PD stopped someone who matched Dorner's description on the 7th, questioned him and let him go. Perhaps SDPD needs to train the other forces?

Perhaps a siege would have been better, but there was a lot of concern about darkness falling. It would have been very easy for him to get away.

He was a dead man one way or the other as soon as he killed the first person. As I noted earlier, the protest you shared here was pretty darned small for Los Angeles. I have to wonder whether people are more relieved that he's dead and we don't have to go through the time and expense of a trial, rather than being outraged over a lack of due process.

And perhaps we should be more concerned about that than anything else.

I imagine it was a small gathering because of the speed they had it and the lack of advertising/spreading the word.

I have been following the case/articles/news about Christopher Dorner pretty closely and I didn't even hear about the Protest till after it happened.

He was in a cabin. If the Police can lose someone that is in a cabin when they have multiple agencies there, swat teams and armored vehicles from different areas. Darkness would not give him cover. He would have to open a door or a window to leave. The only way he would have "escaped" from there is if everyone agreed to close their eyes.

I don't think I ever met anyone that has suggested that it was a good thing he was dead so they don't have to go through a expensive trial. I think as someone else mentioned. It is probably more along the lines of most people understand that LAPD is corrupt and this wasn't a shock to them.

There are no real ways to go about this. Try to bring light on a situation to change it. Or give up and let it be. The more people put the light on them and the corruption the harder it is for them to get away with it.


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If they enforced bank regulations like they do park rules, we wouldn't be in this mess

Naturewoman4
by Platinum Member on Feb. 18, 2013 at 12:27 AM

Brooke, there's no doubt what the cops did in shooting up that truck of those 2 innocent women was so sloppy & careless.  I still can't believe they would do that.  Those cops that did that, will/should be fired.  What I was wondering though, & this is not to excuse the cops, but why did the women in the truck have their headlights off driving in the direction of the police?  From what I heard, the cops were staking out the area, because someone on the LAPD lived on the street & was on the hit list of Dorner.  

Imo, the police did not intentionally go out & kill anyone.  But, Dorner did.  So, those two things IMO, are not the same.  I personally feel the police knew what Dorner's plan was from his manifesto.  Dorner was very good as a sniper.  I believe the police really felt that Dorner would probably end up killing more people.  Police & their family members.  TO ME, I think this was a very tense & difficult situation.  Yes, I wish somehow this would of turned out differently.  But, Dorner wanted to die.  There was nothing the police would of been able to do about that.  As sad as it all was, I think it turned out the only way it could of turned out.  Had it not of went that way I believe more would of died.   


Quoting brookiecookie87:

 

 

Quoting gdiamante:

 

Quoting brookiecookie87:

Your analogy is incorrect. It would be like one of the offensive line men saying, "Let's injure the quarterback", and then another one saying, "Yeah, let's injure him so he can't play anymore!"

Then he gets injured and the coach says, "It was an accident. The injury was not intentional".

Except in this situation we have it on tape that was live. It's nothing like a fan saying it. Because a fan has no direct influence over what happens in a game. The Police Officers do. Especially if multiple officers are saying it.

Especially when you can listen to the Police Scanners where they say they are going to deploy -7- burners.


Do you know why they are called burners?

I do. My point was that the very understandable attitude of the cops on the scene wasn't driving what was going on at the command post in another location, as the sun was going down.

What we got on tape live was only part of what was going on, not the full picture. Yep, they deployed the burners. And to be honest I was more worried that they'd start a major forest fire than anything else.

Yes, I believe Dorner was unfairly fired. And ya know what? I give him credit for not killing that couple in the cabin or the old man with a boat in San Diego.

But he loses all sympathy when he kills ANYONE. If getting his GOOD NAME was important, he chose the WRONG WAY to do it and would have been more successful by setting himself afire in front of the LAPD as a protest.

Oh-I wasn't implying Christopher Dorner was some hero who they should have let run free. He allegedly killed people and needed to be caught to be put on trial and face his punishment. I was just pointing out that they didn't even try to arrest him. And every action they did showed us they had no intention of arresting him.

From shooting at the two other trucks with innocent people inside to deploying -7- Burners to start the fire.

If Officers are heard saying they should burn him. And Police say on their scanners they are going to deploy 7 burners. And burners are known to start a fire (Only amplified by the fact that they used 7). It seems kind of silly to suggest they didn't intend for that fire to happen.

I would agree that he choose the wrong way to clear his name. But that doesn't mean the Police were right in attempting to kill him at every chance they got instead of arresting him.

And it doesn't change the fact that they highlighted the points he made in his manifesto. He said they don't care who they hurt if they "match" the description. Then they end up shooting at three people because they "matched" a description.

You said you lost all sympathy for Christopher Dorner when he killed someone. Are the Police (And their procedures) off the hook because they have bad aim and their 40+ shots didn't kill anyone? If the 71 year old lady they shot in the back during her newspaper delivery route dies will you also agree they were wrong?


 

Naturewoman4
by Platinum Member on Feb. 18, 2013 at 12:38 AM

Idk, I think most people were thinking it was going to end up this way anyway.  That no more people were going to die now by Dorner.  Because, he was pretty darn good at his aim!!!  Who knows how many people would of died due to Dorner.  So, I saythis sadly, that he had to be stopped.  After reading his manifesto is when I realized this.  Because, his thoughts were if you want to find 1 person to kill, & if you have to burn down the whole house, with all the family in it. 

 He knew where all the people that he wanted to kill lived.  He probably knew where the kids went to school.  His OWN words said he would kill the kids to get to the person he wanted to kill!!  That's crazy!!  So, nope I believe most of the Country feel that SADLY he had to be killed.  Yes, I do believe a lot were happy & some feel it saved us a lot of money on the trial & keeping him in prison all his life, IF he didn't get the death penalty.   


Quoting brookiecookie87:

 

 

Quoting gdiamante:

Hmm. Well I do know San Diego PD stopped someone who matched Dorner's description on the 7th, questioned him and let him go. Perhaps SDPD needs to train the other forces?

Perhaps a siege would have been better, but there was a lot of concern about darkness falling. It would have been very easy for him to get away.

He was a dead man one way or the other as soon as he killed the first person. As I noted earlier, the protest you shared here was pretty darned small for Los Angeles. I have to wonder whether people are more relieved that he's dead and we don't have to go through the time and expense of a trial, rather than being outraged over a lack of due process.

And perhaps we should be more concerned about that than anything else.

I imagine it was a small gathering because of the speed they had it and the lack of advertising/spreading the word.

I have been following the case/articles/news about Christopher Dorner pretty closely and I didn't even hear about the Protest till after it happened.

He was in a cabin. If the Police can lose someone that is in a cabin when they have multiple agencies there, swat teams and armored vehicles from different areas. Darkness would not give him cover. He would have to open a door or a window to leave. The only way he would have "escaped" from there is if everyone agreed to close their eyes.

I don't think I ever met anyone that has suggested that it was a good thing he was dead so they don't have to go through a expensive trial. I think as someone else mentioned. It is probably more along the lines of most people understand that LAPD is corrupt and this wasn't a shock to them.

There are no real ways to go about this. Try to bring light on a situation to change it. Or give up and let it be. The more people put the light on them and the corruption the harder it is for them to get away with it.

 


 

soonergirl980
by Silver Member on Feb. 18, 2013 at 1:09 AM


so they died because they were not innocent and he died because he wasn't innocent so it's all good right?

Quoting neveensaffron:

I will bet my sons life that those cops were NOT "innocent".

He targeted those dead cops for a reason.




Quoting soonergirl980:


The excuses that people like you are making for him is down right appalling. The same people calling me and other gun owners "gun nuts" who don't care about the lives of the victims are now throwing out bullshit excuses to explain away this mans behavior. hes not a cold blooded killer because he was on a "mission". I'm sure his victims who were INNOCENT thought he was a sweetheart right before he ripped the life out of them.


Quoting brookiecookie87:


You say he was shot in the head. Other people would disagree. There was a deputy that reported he shot him in the head.

https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=330938277023308&id=149828588467612&comment_id=27749822&offset=0&total_comments=112

It's not a, "we will never know" situation. They -thought- they found him twice and both times shot at the trucks without even confirming if it was really him. That means even if he tried to turn himself in. He would have been shot in his truck.

Have you seen the interviews of the hostages he took? None of them had anything bad to say about him. All of them are accommodated in some way. Whether it is letting them go safely, letting them take their dog, leaving their phone next to them so they can get help after they escape.

If he killed all these people as a cold blooded killer would do-He would still be free. But he didn't. Like any officer or soldier who kills during their mission they are doing what they think are right. That is what Christopher Dorner was doing. And clearly he was wrong to kill the people he did. But if he was a disgusting cold blooded killer he would have killed those hostages/people he ran into. And he would probably still be out there today.


Quoting soonergirl980:

I care about him shooting himself in the head as much as I care about Adam Lanza shooting himself in the head. They are both disgusting cold blooded killers. They both could have given themselves up but they did. You can say well they would have killed him anyway but we will never know because he took his own like to make himself the martyr you are making him out to be.










Goodwoman614
by Satan on Feb. 18, 2013 at 4:18 AM

Oh my f*kkin dawg! Let us see how many X a natural-born dumba$$ can say "would of" whilst rambling on incoherently ...

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