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Need recommendation from homeschooling mommas

Posted by on Feb. 19, 2013 at 12:17 PM
  • 16 Replies
My son is 2-1/2 and speech delayed. He is picking up single words in the last month. While he doesn't "talk" he will say one word nouns mostly.

However he knows the alphabet, upper and lower case very well (can't say G or J yet) and seems obsessed with the alphabet, always calling out letters he sees, waking at 5am reciting the alphabet, etc.

So, I was thinking of maybe starting to teach him to put letters together and learn to read... I wouldn't push it, but I see how much he loves letters and want to encourage it.

So, where do I start with teaching a mostly non-verbal child how to read? Any programs (hooked on phonics) or books you would recommend?
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by on Feb. 19, 2013 at 12:17 PM
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Goodwoman614
by Satan on Feb. 19, 2013 at 12:23 PM
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Just read to him. Go to the library often, and let him explore. Let him choose, help check out, carry books to the car. Let him look at all the pictures. Let him see you reading your own books, and discussing what you've read to others.  Don't worry too much about "teaching" him...it's happening already, unintentionally, and without you classifying it as such, if you do or facilitate allowing him to do all the other things listed here.

Euphoric
by Bazinga! on Feb. 19, 2013 at 12:23 PM
bump
JamesMom714
by Bronze Member on Feb. 19, 2013 at 12:38 PM
Thanks! That's a good idea. I read to him a lot, he doesn't sit still through it but I imagine its sinking in some. :)

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eema.gray
by on Feb. 19, 2013 at 12:42 PM

I wouldn't teach reading, honestly.

Does he have a diagnosis and/or getting therapy?

My daughter's developmental specialist told us to not worry about any kind of literacy skills until she had caught up on her speech development; specialist said that skipping over developmental stages - skipping speech mastery to focus on reading, for example - can cause long range problems that experts are only just beginning to understand.  If he's in therapy, I would work with his therapist(s) at a developmentally correct pace and continue to encourage correct phonetic pronouciation.  If you don't have it, see if you can get a hold of a speech therapy CD called Speech Er Cize.  It's a lot of fun for little ones and really works on pronoucing individual letter sounds as well as combination sounds.

crafthag
by Member on Feb. 19, 2013 at 12:43 PM
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"Teach Your Child To Read in 100 Easy Lessons" However, I think 2 is way too young. Wait another year or two. I taught my twin girls with this book. I waited until they were 5 1/2 they are now 6 1/2 and read two grade levels higher than their grade.
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JamesMom714
by Bronze Member on Feb. 19, 2013 at 12:45 PM
Good information!

He starts speech therapy march 4th and will have an hour a week for the next 16 weeks (until he turns three, then he will transition into the school program if still needed). He will also have 4 sessions with the developmental therapist, more if needed. With the speech delay it is hard to tell if there are cognitive delays or only speech.

Thanks for the info! I really appreciate it and will look for that CD.


Quoting eema.gray:

I wouldn't teach reading, honestly.

Does he have a diagnosis and/or getting therapy?

My daughter's developmental specialist told us to not worry about any kind of literacy skills until she had caught up on her speech development; specialist said that skipping over developmental stages - skipping speech mastery to focus on reading, for example - can cause long range problems that experts are only just beginning to understand.  If he's in therapy, I would work with his therapist(s) at a developmentally correct pace and continue to encourage correct phonetic pronouciation.  If you don't have it, see if you can get a hold of a speech therapy CD called Speech Er Cize.  It's a lot of fun for little ones and really works on pronoucing individual letter sounds as well as combination sounds.


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gammie
by on Feb. 19, 2013 at 12:49 PM

Just read to him, do easy baby books the ones with the large words. You never know he may start to read or  not but this is a great start.

The best gift a mother can give a child is the love of reading.

eema.gray
by on Feb. 19, 2013 at 12:55 PM

I'll tell you a little about my son.  :-)  He was functionally non verbal at his third birthday.  We got a diagnosis of apraxia of speech about six weeks after his birthday.  He's 5 now and has an age appropriate vocabulary.  His grammer is (as one would expect) still pretty shaky at this point, as is his clarity of speech but he has made absolutely astonishing progress.  Two years ago, he said yes, no, mommy, daddy, and "gah."  EVERYTHING that could not be answered with one of his 4 words, was "gah."  I'm sure you can imagine the temper tantrums!  He exhibited a lot of autistic-like behaviors as well, simply because he could not communicate.  My son doesn't have cognitive delays; apraxia is essentially a short circuit between language centers in the brain and the muscles of the mouth.  He knows what he wants to say, he just has trouble shaping his mouth and moving his tongue correctly.

Since your son knows the verbal alphabet well, you might teach it to him in ASL to continue challenging him.  Also teach him ASL signs for wants and needs.  Match words/signs to the alphabet - words that start with "A" for example.  This will reinforce what he knows and add depth of knowledge, without skipping the important step of mastering speech.  Signing helps a ton with language aquisition, it develops multiple routes through the brain along which language information can travel.  It also helps cut down on temper tantrums and other negative behavior because it gives the child a positive way to communicate.  Right now, ANY means of communication is positive!


Quoting JamesMom714:

Good information!

He starts speech therapy march 4th and will have an hour a week for the next 16 weeks (until he turns three, then he will transition into the school program if still needed). He will also have 4 sessions with the developmental therapist, more if needed. With the speech delay it is hard to tell if there are cognitive delays or only speech.

Thanks for the info! I really appreciate it and will look for that CD.


Quoting eema.gray:

I wouldn't teach reading, honestly.

Does he have a diagnosis and/or getting therapy?

My daughter's developmental specialist told us to not worry about any kind of literacy skills until she had caught up on her speech development; specialist said that skipping over developmental stages - skipping speech mastery to focus on reading, for example - can cause long range problems that experts are only just beginning to understand.  If he's in therapy, I would work with his therapist(s) at a developmentally correct pace and continue to encourage correct phonetic pronouciation.  If you don't have it, see if you can get a hold of a speech therapy CD called Speech Er Cize.  It's a lot of fun for little ones and really works on pronoucing individual letter sounds as well as combination sounds.





"I am only one, but I am still one; I cannot do everything, but still I can do something; and because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do." ~~ Edward Everett Hale 1822-1909
kailu1835
by Ruby Member on Feb. 19, 2013 at 1:27 PM

Does your son know what the letter say?  I realize he isn't really very verbal, but if you ask him "does this letter make this sound" will he get it correct?  If not, then I'd start there.  If yes, then absolutely it would be a good time to start putting sounds together.  It would probably help the speech delay issue also.  I love hooked on phonics, but what really helped word building for my son was a card game in which there is a beginning sound (one letter) on some of the cards, and ending sounds (two letters) on the other.  For instance, in one hand you might have the beginning sounds b and c, and then ending sounds at, et, & ot.  You can then create various words, such as bat, cat, bet, cot.  My son would put together silly combos, like bot or cet, and look at it, and we'd read it together, and he'd say "THAT'S not a word!!"  It didn't take long to pick up :)

DawnPratt23
by Member on Feb. 19, 2013 at 1:31 PM
I started starfall.com, abcmouse and reading eggs with my kids. It has helped their speech and skills a lot more than just reading to them. Also I correct them a lot more now when they aren't completing each sound correctly.

You can also use sign language, it helped a lot with my autistic son.
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