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If a person served their time for a felony should they continue to be punished?

Posted by on Feb. 23, 2013 at 12:08 PM
  • 93 Replies

Equal Employment Opportunities Commission directive posted to its website which advises employers that the results of criminal background checks can’t be used to exclude applicants because of the effects such practices may have on “protected groups.”

82% of people in a survey reported being denied housing because of a felony or knowing someone who is a felon.

http://www.cabrillo.edu/academics/ace/pdfs/

student_research_ppts/Fall%2008/FA08_DiscriminationFelons.pdf


Do you feel it is fair to discriminate against them because of a paid for, past mistake?

Is it not important to have them become a contributing member of society?

Would you be afraid to have a felon living next to you?

by on Feb. 23, 2013 at 12:08 PM
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Replies (1-10):
stormcris
by Christy on Feb. 23, 2013 at 1:12 PM
2 moms liked this

I would like to see the discrimination stop.

Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Feb. 23, 2013 at 1:18 PM
5 moms liked this

I would like to see it stop, too. However, there are obvious crimes such as murder, rape, molestation, and legitimate pedophilia that will forever be a cross to bear for those who have been convicted.

I don't think that former thieves, drug addicts, alcoholics and/or other 'minor' criminals (whether felonious or not) should forever be cast out by society.


stormcris
by Christy on Feb. 23, 2013 at 1:26 PM
1 mom liked this

Those capital crimes will always have limitations but to outright not let them contribute to society in any way seems counterproductive.  Some of these capital crimes need to be determined for threat to society. There are people who have a sort of murder charge that was not quite self defense but was in defense of self. Yet, even these people perhaps could perhaps find a place to benefit society in a way that assures the safety of society. Not entirely sure how but perhaps.

Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:

I would like to see it stop, too. However, there are obvious crimes such as murder, rape, molestation, and legitimate pedophilia that will forever be a cross to bear for those who have been convicted.

I don't think that former thieves, drug addicts, alcoholics and/or other 'minor' criminals (whether felonious or not) should forever be cast out by society.



WesternNYmom
by Silver Member on Feb. 23, 2013 at 1:28 PM
4 moms liked this

For me it would depend on the crime. If the person served time for felony drug possession, I would let it go, as the person probably learned his lesson. On the other hand, If I found out that my neighbor was in and out of prison for violent crimes such as rape, assult, murder, or served several sentences for molesting children, I would be worried.  Not only for my safety, but for the safety of my children.  As for employment, I think it depends on the crime committed as well. If I was an employer, I don't think I would hire someone who waas convicted of embezzelment to handle money, or keep track of the company accounts. I also would never hire anyone who had been convicted of molesting children to work in a daycare, or school.

Mom2Phoenix2011
by on Feb. 23, 2013 at 1:29 PM
3 moms liked this
Honestly it depends on the crime. I am not saying people do not change but some just don't.
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lga1965
by on Feb. 23, 2013 at 1:31 PM

 

Quoting Mom2Phoenix2011:

Honestly it depends on the crime. I am not saying people do not change but some just don't.

 I think you're right.

And,yes,it depends on the crime.

stormcris
by Christy on Feb. 23, 2013 at 1:38 PM
1 mom liked this

I am thinking that positions that align with your previous incarceration would be off limits as the forbidden fruit scenario. However, it could be possible that a person might prove themselves in cases such as embezzelment. There are certain crimes that will always exist as a possible threat and if it is a threat to public safety then the public safety would certainly win after proven to be an issue.

Quoting WesternNYmom:

For me it would depend on the crime. If the person served time for felony drug possession, I would let it go, as the person probably learned his lesson. On the other hand, If I found out that my neighbor was in and out of prison for violent crimes such as rape, assult, murder, or served several sentences for molesting children, I would be worried.  Not only for my safety, but for the safety of my children.  As for employment, I think it depends on the crime committed as well. If I was an employer, I don't think I would hire someone who waas convicted of embezzelment to handle money, or keep track of the company accounts. I also would never hire anyone who had been convicted of molesting children to work in a daycare, or school.


desertlvn
by Silver Member on Feb. 23, 2013 at 1:39 PM

Depends on the crime.

Violent crimes I want to know about. 

specialwingz
by Bronze Member on Feb. 23, 2013 at 1:39 PM
1 mom liked this

I do believe in time served and being allowed to start back up in society.  However, there are times where it just isn't feasible.  For instance...although a child molester has served their time, they should most certainly be denied employment at any type of facility that has to do with children of any age.  And, I can totally see an embezzler being denied a job in a financial institution.

So, it's not all black and white.  It is very dependent upon the type of crime committed and the job for which is being applied.

Jennygurl09
by on Feb. 23, 2013 at 1:40 PM
Depends on the crime.
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