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Be careful of what you are downloading starting Monday 2/25

Posted by on Feb. 23, 2013 at 7:11 PM
  • 47 Replies

Six Strike Policy Launch Scheduled For Monday, Feb. 25; Copyright Alert System Could Hurt Open Wi-Fi

The six-strikes policy was devised by entertainment lobbying groups, including the Motion Picture Association of America, or MPAA, and Recording Industry Association of America, or RIAA, in conjunction with every major Internet service provider, or ISP, in the U.S.

The promulgators of the anti-piracy program have frequently been criticized as being slow in revealing information about it, and, true to form, they have made no official announcement about its launch date. However, TorrentFreak said a source close to the scheme confirmed it as being Monday.

In an effort to thwart online users who casually download films, music, and other media content illegally, ISPs under six-strikes policy will use a series of escalating messages to warn customers that they have been tracked. Downloaders of allegedly copyrighted content will be forced to acknowledge they have received warnings by either checking boxes or watching educational videos about piracy, depending on the relevant ISP.

Varying slightly among the major ISPs -- AT&T Inc. (NYSE:T), Cablevision Systems Corp. (NYSE:CVC), Comcast Corp. (NASDAQ:CMCSA), Time Warner Cable Inc. (NYSE:TWC), and Verizon Communications Inc. (NYSE:VZ) -- the enforcement methods will encompass the stipulation that, should the ISP's repeated threats be ignored, a customer’s Internet speed will be temporarily slowed. 

The ISPs and lobbying groups have united under the Center for Copyright Information banner, but the organization is already coming under fire for its supposed lack of transparency and flawed enforcement methods.

In the past, copyright enforcers have targeted pirates by using files they download to track their Internet protocol addresses. Because of that method’s failure, the Copyright Alert System will instead focus on Internet connections that tap an amount of bandwidth consistent with what would be expected to be used by an illegal downloader.

In fact, the Copyright Alert System launch was delayed at least twice, most recently last November, because of a reported disagreement among the ISPs over the blatant monitoring of customers’ Internet use.

Concerns over the unintended consequences of the six-strikes policy include its effects on open Wi-Fi networks found in cafes and other Internet hot spots. Those places will almost certainly become ensnared by ISPs because of patrons who have downloaded purportedly copyrighted media.

“Despite their lack of control, they will find themselves subject to the Copyright Alert System,” Geoff Duncan wrote at Digital Trends. “And, although it’s rare, the technosavvy can pretty easily crack passwords on many Wi-Fi networks. That quiet kid in the apartment down the hall might be doing all his torrenting on your Internet connection, rather than his own.”

Also at risk is the Open Wireless Movement, a coalition dedicated to opening all Internet networks to promote digital freedom and trust online.

by on Feb. 23, 2013 at 7:11 PM
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oddgirl
by Bronze Member on Feb. 23, 2013 at 7:14 PM

And here's an interesting FAQ about the Copyright Alert System

http://www.dailydot.com/news/copyright-alerts-system-six-strikes-primer-guide/

Including this info:

Wait, the CAS can falsely flag me?

We don't know for sure until it's deployed, but there's reason to be concerned that the CAS isn't perfect. The creators of the CAS software, MarkMonitor, got some egg on their face recently when they sent a stern, automated letter to Google that essentially said "stop linking to this site, because it streams HBO's copyrighted content!" The site? HBO.com.

Plus, there was a scandal in October when news came out that the independent consultant hired to make sure MarkMonitor was doing a fair job had spent years as a lobbyist for a music industry group, the Record Industry Association of America (RIAA), which helped found the CAS. The woman in charge of the CAS's implementation, Jill Lesser, said she hadn't been aware of the connection and promised to hire a second consultant for the sake of transparency. That still hasn't happened.

I don't pirate files, so why should I care?

Three big reasons.

First, the possibility that you'll be falsely flagged. People certainly do get sued for copyright infringement they never committed; just Google the phrase "copyright troll."

Second, this is bad, possibly devastating news for the Open Wireless Movement, which encourages people to keep their Wi-Fi open to neighbors and passersby as a public service. But as you now, the CAS wants to stress that anyone who pays for a connection is responsible for what happens on it.

Third, while the folks behind the CAS say it's purely an "educational" system, your fifth and sixth strikes will slow your connection speed to a crawl for several days. Some folks find that an unfair punishment, especially considering it's designed to happen to paying customers who haven't been to any kind of trial.

Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Feb. 23, 2013 at 7:44 PM

I don't upload anything with the exception of itunes to my library.

oddgirl
by Bronze Member on Feb. 23, 2013 at 8:06 PM

The thing is, it doesn't have to be you personally.  Anyone using your internet service - your siblings, your kids, your SO, anyone squatting on your connection if you have wi-fi. 


Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:

I don't upload anything with the exception of itunes to my library.



Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Feb. 23, 2013 at 8:39 PM
2 moms liked this


Quoting oddgirl:

The thing is, it doesn't have to be you personally.  Anyone using your internet service - your siblings, your kids, your SO, anyone squatting on your connection if you have wi-fi. 


Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:

I don't upload anything with the exception of itunes to my library.



I have toddlers and a secure wifi, I got it covered! = )

FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Feb. 23, 2013 at 8:42 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting oddgirl:

The thing is, it doesn't have to be you personally.  Anyone using your internet service - your siblings, your kids, your SO, anyone squatting on your connection if you have wi-fi. 


Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:

I don't upload anything with the exception of itunes to my library.



I'm not concerned about my kiddo, or any one visiting my house, doing something like this. 

And I certainly do not have my wireless open to the public.

oddgirl
by Bronze Member on Feb. 23, 2013 at 10:21 PM

I would imagine the people who do casually download copyrighted material illegally wouldn't be too quick to chime in with an admission of guilt. Also, for people with teens in their household, you might not know your kids are downloading or sharing copyright protected material so just a heads up.

toomanypoodles
by Ruby Member on Feb. 24, 2013 at 5:23 AM

 I have never downloaded anything.  I don't even like to click on links or download anything sent to me in an e-mail. 

viv212
by Gold Member on Feb. 24, 2013 at 5:25 AM
I think this might affect me. I have a jail broken iPad and Appletv that we download movies on all the time.
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Mommy_of_Riley
by Jes on Feb. 24, 2013 at 9:05 AM
1 mom liked this
Well I guess I will be putting a password on my Wi-Fi...
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Euphoric
by Bazinga! on Feb. 24, 2013 at 10:33 AM

 bump

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