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CDC warn hospitals nationwide about Super Bug that is growing....

Posted by on Feb. 27, 2013 at 8:02 AM
  • 38 Replies

Scary stuff. This is what happens when people demand antibiotics for every little nose sniffle and every product on the market has "antibacterial" crap in it. 

 

Reports of rare superbug jump in US, CDC says

CDC

In the U.S. today, the most common type of highly drug-resistant germs known as CREs are the Klebsiella pneumonia bacteria like those shown here. Nearly untreatable, they're being detected in a growing number of health care settings.

By JoNel Aleccia, Staff Writer, NBC News

A sharp jump in the number of rare but potentially deadly types of a superbug resistant to nearly all last-resort antibiotics has prompted government health officials to renew warnings for U.S. hospitals, nursing homes and other health care settings.

The move comes just as researchers in Israel are reporting that people colonized with dangerous CRE -- Carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae -- can take more than a year before they test negative for the bacteria, making it more difficult to control -- and raising the risk of wider spread.

Reports of unusual forms of CRE have nearly doubled in the U.S., the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported this month. Of 37 cases of rare forms of CRE, including the alarming NDM -- New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase -- 15 have been reported since last July.

"This increase highlights the need for U.S. health care providers to act aggressively to prevent the emergence and spread of these unusual CRE organisms," the CDC said in a health advisory.

CREs are part of a family of drug-resistant germs that have shown up in growing numbers of U.S. health care settings. They're named for their ability to elude carbapenem antibiotics, the big guns in the medical arsenal. They usually strike people who are already ill and require devices such as ventilators or catheters or who have been taking antibiotics for a long time. But they can occur in any patient.

Twenty-nine of the unusual CRE cases have been NDM, up from the first case detected in the U.S. in 2010, said the CDC's Dr. Alex Kallen, a medical epidemiologist and outbreak response coordinator in the agency's Healthcare Quality Promotion division. It's especially alarming because it confers resistance to multiple drugs and is easily transmitted to other types of bacteria.

The others were even rarer types of CRE, including VIMs, IMPs and OXA-48s, all of which produce enzymes that render most antibiotics virtually useless.

The agency called for stricter isolation and hygiene precautions, increased screening of patients potentially colonized with CRE and better communication within and between hospitals and other health care settings where the bugs can become intractable -- and deadly. CRE infections have a mortality of up to 40 percent, much higher than other health care infections, such as those caused by MRSA or C. difficile.

"Our main objective is to slow or stop the spread in places where we can identify them," said Kallen. "Right now, the therapeutic options are very limited."

Health officials have been worried about them for more than a decade, particularly the KPCs, or carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumonia, which have now been reported in 43 U.S. states, the CDC reports.

Nine states have reported NDMs and at least two have reported other rare forms that also block antibiotic effectiveness, including those known as VIMs, or Verona integron-encoded metallo-beta-lactamase, and IMPs. So far, they've been associated mostly with people who've been hospitalized in countries outside the U.S.

The bugs were in the news last summer after reports of a CRE strain of Klebsiella penumoniae roared through the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center near Washington, D.C., killing seven people, including a 16-year-old boy.

In Colorado last summer, NDM-producing CRE was detected in eight patients, the largest outbreak in the U.S. to date, according to a CDC report this month. It was found largely because the University of Colorado Hospital already has stringent surveillance protocols in place, said Dr. Michelle Barron, director of infection control and prevention. Since then, the hospital has probably tested 500 or 600 patients with unusual resistance patterns, she told NBC News.

None of the eight patients in the original outbreak died. The evidence showed that patients who were colonized with the germs, but not actually sick, contributed to the spread.

That's a point underscored by the study by Israeli doctors published Wednesday in the American Journal of Infection Control. They studied medical records of adult patients hospitalized between January 2009 and December 2010 at Shaare Zedek Medical Center, a 700-bed, university-affiliated hospital in Jerusalem.

In 97 patients with positive CRE cultures, it took a mean time of 387 days to log a negative test -- and nearly 40 percent remained positive after a year, according to Dr. Amon Yinnon, one of the study authors.

"The major concern is that an undiagnosed carrier may be admitted to hospital for totally unrelated reasons, and subsequently and unwittingly pass his CRE to other patients," Yinnon said in an email to NBC News.

Patients who were hospitalized repeatedly were at higher risk of remaining colonized with CRE, the study found.

CDC officials hope to increase awareness of the growing problem among the general public as well as the health care providers before it gets out of control.

"I can't predict the future, of course, but there is a concern that we can see more of these as they spread," Kallen said. "This can become a community bug."


by on Feb. 27, 2013 at 8:02 AM
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Replies (1-10):
babygirl4326
by Member on Feb. 27, 2013 at 8:04 AM

BUMP!

mehamil1
by Platinum Member on Feb. 27, 2013 at 8:25 AM
4 moms liked this

Ah crap. 

I don't understand why people take anti biotics so often. It's beyond my comprehension. or are doctors over prescribing it? I've read about people taking them for urinary tract infections and that just boggles my mind. I get those not too often but often enough. I just drink a shit ton of water and it clears up in a day. No need for anti biotics. I understand there can be bad cases of if where anti biotics really would be needed. I am speaking in general. 

I had pneumonia earlier this year. That was the last time I took anti biotics. I gotta be really sick to take medication. 

unspecified42
by Bronze Member on Feb. 27, 2013 at 8:47 AM
1 mom liked this

It's ridiculous how often we hand out antibiotics and narcotics in this country. It's like goddamn candy in the ER. You wouldn't believe the fits people pitch when the physicians don't give them antibiotics and they think they need it. I've even had them scream at me when we don't prescribe the specific antibiotic they want (in that case it was for a child with a skin infection and Mom wanted the same antibiotic she got for her respiratory infection.)

It's bullshit. Physicians are essentially forced to give antibiotics for everything by a demanding public who is quick to sue if they don't get what they want. It's an 'order what you want and complain if you don't get it because it isn't medically necessary' service industry these days. Every ear ache, cough, and burning urethra gets a script because god forbid anyone treat symptomatically and let the body fight off infection on it's own. No, then if it gets worse and they have to get antibiotics the doctor was a moron and should be sued and have his practice shut down. 

It's utterly ridiculous. But isn't just a human problem. The vast majority of the antibiotics in this country are consumed by our livestock, and only last year did the CDC recognize that this is part of the problem.

cjsbmom
by Lois Lane on Feb. 27, 2013 at 8:53 AM
1 mom liked this

I think patients demand it, and doctors fork them over to make their patients happy. It's a bad cycle. 

Quoting mehamil1:

Ah crap. 

I don't understand why people take anti biotics so often. It's beyond my comprehension. or are doctors over prescribing it? I've read about people taking them for urinary tract infections and that just boggles my mind. I get those not too often but often enough. I just drink a shit ton of water and it clears up in a day. No need for anti biotics. I understand there can be bad cases of if where anti biotics really would be needed. I am speaking in general. 

I had pneumonia earlier this year. That was the last time I took anti biotics. I gotta be really sick to take medication. 


mamaofficer
by Member on Feb. 27, 2013 at 9:00 AM
1 mom liked this

Great just one more thing to put on the" Worry" table.

romalove
by Roma on Feb. 27, 2013 at 9:01 AM
1 mom liked this

Like I didn't have enough to worry about today.

Sigh....

Euphoric
by Bazinga! on Feb. 27, 2013 at 10:08 AM

 Eek, scary. I only use an antibiotic if I get an ear infection.

mikiemom
by Ruby Member on Feb. 27, 2013 at 10:22 AM

My step-daughter gets pissed if she takes my Gdd to the doctor and they don't perscribe anti-biotics yikes. I can't tell her anything though because she is an EMT and she thinks she knows it all.

Yep, I worked with a Virologist a few years back on a system he was creating to track disease across the country - his projections were down right terrifying.

lizmarie1975
by Gold Member on Feb. 27, 2013 at 10:27 AM

When I was younger we used to get antibiotics for EVERYTHING. Then when I had kids I noticed that the pediatrician really didn't prescibe them often. My oldest has only had it once, for strept when he was about 4, my 7 year old had it to get rid of an infection in her tooth, and my younger two have never had it.

meriana
by Platinum Member on Feb. 27, 2013 at 10:35 AM

The advances medical science makes are often way over-used, not only because the dr.'s tend to promote them as a really good thing but also, as others have mentioned, the public demands them and the result can be stronger bugs that are immune to current "fixes". Then they work on developing something even stronger to combat those bugs and the cycle repeats itself. 

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