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Ok, so the woman at my new job that is helping me learn some specifics about the office holds some "opinionated" views and she doesn't mind sharing. I don't think she realizes that I am her new boss. Has anyone else ever run into a situation like this before? Either from the employee's perspective or the supervisor's?
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by on Mar. 9, 2013 at 8:04 PM
Replies (31-40):
LauraKW
by "Dude!" on Mar. 9, 2013 at 10:18 PM
1 mom liked this

 There is a difference between using someone and utilizing a co-worker's knowledge when you're new to the office.  I have a feeling she won't be as helpful once our roles become more defined, and I don't want to waste time figuring out the small things when I have a great resource there.

Quoting JoshRachelsMAMA:

It's not cool to use her.

Quoting LauraKW:

 First I have to get what I need out of her.  That sounds so wrong.


Quoting NewMom11222011:


If you are her boss, you need to pull her into your office (if you have one) or into HR (if there is one) and set her straight asap.


 

 

turtle68
by Mahinaarangi on Mar. 9, 2013 at 10:39 PM
1 mom liked this

 My best advice is to always nip it in the bud if you are already aware of her issues.  With me being a boss was a balance between friendly, fair and consistant.  Knowing your employees is the best way to finding out how to handle things.

good luck :-)

Quoting LauraKW:

 I thought about that tactic with her.  Problem is I know she won't shut up if I let it go.  I also know her productivity level won't change without some intervention.

Quoting turtle68:

 Ok...slightly different scenario IMO.  Some people think they do hold a level of power as an actual supervisor or team leader.

I remember being paid a grand total of 10 dollars more a week to be team leader....try telling that to the old ladies who had been employed for the last 20 years LOL.  Sometimes you have to take your position with a grain of salt and work with what actually is easiest for the best outcome.  I found it easier to let the old ladies see themselves as my superiors...it didnt change the job outcome :-)

Quoting LauraKW:

 She thinks our positions are lateral.  The last person in my new position did what was in her job description and nothing more, as does this other person.  She has already mentioned that I will only have to do X in this position and the rest of my time will be free.  That isn't going to cut it any longer.

Quoting LindaClement:

Why doesn't she know?

 

 

 

 

Euphoric
by Bazinga! on Mar. 9, 2013 at 10:45 PM

 Eek

motha2daDuchess
by Bruja on Mar. 9, 2013 at 10:46 PM
she thinks your roles are lateral, why are you beibg trained by someone that will ultimately be an underling? I once worked with a chick that told her whole life story including the child at 13 and meth head by 16....she found it bonded her quickly to supes and managers..
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
JoshRachelsMAMA
by JRM on Mar. 9, 2013 at 10:55 PM
How long has she worked there?

Quoting LauraKW:

 There is a difference between using someone and utilizing a co-worker's knowledge when you're new to the office.  I have a feeling she won't be as helpful once our roles become more defined, and I don't want to waste time figuring out the small things when I have a great resource there.


Quoting JoshRachelsMAMA:

It's not cool to use her.


Quoting LauraKW:


 First I have to get what I need out of her.  That sounds so wrong.



Quoting NewMom11222011:



If you are her boss, you need to pull her into your office (if you have one) or into HR (if there is one) and set her straight asap.



 


 

Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
kleea1969
by Kristine on Mar. 9, 2013 at 11:00 PM


Quoting motha2daDuchess:

she thinks your roles are lateral, why are you beibg trained by someone that will ultimately be an underling? I once worked with a chick that told her whole life story including the child at 13 and meth head by 16....she found it bonded her quickly to supes and managers.

I agree with this, she is never going to feel that you're her boss if she trained you.  I don't see an easy way to handle this, especially starting out the way it did.  I want to say if it keeps up  maybe speak to your supervisor to see how they think you should move ahead, but will that be beneficial or could it hurt your new position?  If you have a good feel for it then maybe give it a shot, if your not sure how that will go over hang in there for a little while I guess.  I have never been in this position so I am sorry I am not being much help.  Whenever I took over in a management position I was trained by the person whose place I was taking, but they  was leaving.  This is a tough situation. 

young_lv_mom
by Member on Mar. 9, 2013 at 11:00 PM
I worked at a job once that after a few years I held some power but not the title (owner and managers liked me but I could not work the hours needed to become a manager). Well they hired a new manager and after a week asked what I thought, I tried like hell to not awnser because she was rude and had not a clue on what she was doing. They fired her the next day and informed me I was the tie breaker on her job, felt like crap after that, not much I could do.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
LauraKW
by "Dude!" on Mar. 10, 2013 at 12:19 AM

 Perhaps "trained" wasn't the best choice of words.  It's more about learning the paper flow than being taught a new skill or procedure.  Like these reports go to this person, this is who you'll call if you need this, this person handles this but in this situation you'll want this person instead.  I hope that makes sense, I'm trying to speak in generals.

Quoting motha2daDuchess:

she thinks your roles are lateral, why are you beibg trained by someone that will ultimately be an underling? I once worked with a chick that told her whole life story including the child at 13 and meth head by 16....she found it bonded her quickly to supes and managers..

 

LauraKW
by "Dude!" on Mar. 10, 2013 at 12:22 AM

 I'm thinking 7 years-ish.  Long enough that she knows ins and outs and contacts that I won't figure out for a while.

Quoting JoshRachelsMAMA:

How long has she worked there?

Quoting LauraKW:

 There is a difference between using someone and utilizing a co-worker's knowledge when you're new to the office.  I have a feeling she won't be as helpful once our roles become more defined, and I don't want to waste time figuring out the small things when I have a great resource there.


Quoting JoshRachelsMAMA:

It's not cool to use her.


Quoting LauraKW:


 First I have to get what I need out of her.  That sounds so wrong.



Quoting NewMom11222011:



If you are her boss, you need to pull her into your office (if you have one) or into HR (if there is one) and set her straight asap.



 


 

 

LauraKW
by "Dude!" on Mar. 10, 2013 at 12:40 AM

 My boss and I had a brief informal discussion about "personalities" in the office and how I should handle them.  I took from that conversation that she - my boss - knows the scoop and is going to let me deal with it.  Which is appropriate for the position.  I just don't want to take that step until I'm more familiar with how the office functions.  Thanks for the tips, it always helps to get thoughts from other perspectives.

Quoting kleea1969:


Quoting motha2daDuchess:

she thinks your roles are lateral, why are you beibg trained by someone that will ultimately be an underling? I once worked with a chick that told her whole life story including the child at 13 and meth head by 16....she found it bonded her quickly to supes and managers.

I agree with this, she is never going to feel that you're her boss if she trained you.  I don't see an easy way to handle this, especially starting out the way it did.  I want to say if it keeps up  maybe speak to your supervisor to see how they think you should move ahead, but will that be beneficial or could it hurt your new position?  If you have a good feel for it then maybe give it a shot, if your not sure how that will go over hang in there for a little while I guess.  I have never been in this position so I am sorry I am not being much help.  Whenever I took over in a management position I was trained by the person whose place I was taking, but they  was leaving.  This is a tough situation. 

 

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