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Mental Healthcare question for people on the right.

Posted by on Mar. 24, 2013 at 8:17 PM
  • 21 Replies

One thing that gun advocates and people who supports bans seem to agree on is that the country needs better health care.  One way people can get better mental care is more funding going into public health care. Conservatives are usually against tax dollars going into social programs. So what do the Conservatives/Libertarian's think on Cafemom? If we focus on the mental health, how can we get people the care need?

How do conservatives feel about spending more money on mental health care?


Update:

Well, that went just as I thought...




by on Mar. 24, 2013 at 8:17 PM
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Replies (1-10):
NWP
by guerrilla girl on Mar. 24, 2013 at 8:22 PM

Wow...I was just addressing this in the Wyoming Suicide post. Talk about timing!..I am curious about this as well.

EireLass
by Ruby Member on Mar. 24, 2013 at 8:23 PM
2 moms liked this

You can have as much health care available as you want....you can't make anyone seek help. Why don't those people seek help? Well, if they're male, society has pounded into them that it's not manly to be emotional. It's not manly to need help. It's really not manly to need emotional help. They don't know how to ask for the help they need. Someone needs to be the voice for them.

GeekMommi
by on Mar. 24, 2013 at 8:30 PM

 I think parents and families can get help for their loved ones if available to them.  Wouldn't more health care put more advocates out there for people with mental issues.  


Quoting EireLass:

You can have as much health care available as you want....you can't make anyone seek help. Why don't those people seek help? Well, if they're male, society has pounded into them that it's not manly to be emotional. It's not manly to need help. It's really not manly to need emotional help. They don't know how to ask for the help they need. Someone needs to be the voice for them.



NewMom11222011
by Bronze Member on Mar. 24, 2013 at 8:31 PM
1 mom liked this

There is still a stigma in our country about needing mental health services, although a huge percentage of people have one or more MH diagnoses.

Mama2Spencerninja

EireLass
by Ruby Member on Mar. 24, 2013 at 10:10 PM

It is out there. Advocates are strangers. Can you imagine a guy who has an emotional disorder, having some 'advocate' stranger call them up or come to their home and start talking to them about a possible issue? Family and friends need to do this. Every hospital has a mental health department. Every VA hospital has one. There are many practitioners already out there. Take Vets for instance. They don't really know how to ask for help. When they are done with their tour, there is no 'talk down'....they're just 'out there'. Left to deal with everything they've seen and been through. Families don't want to acknowledge that someone in their family has issues. They take it personally and feel it's a reflection on them, and don't get the help needed. "What would the neighbors say". If things get ugly, they don't take the necessary steps. They're afraid to call the police who would bring a person to the hospital. The stigma is bigger than what people can deal with....so they just stay in denial, or they ignore it.

Quoting GeekMommi:

 I think parents and families can get help for their loved ones if available to them.  Wouldn't more health care put more advocates out there for people with mental issues. 

Quoting EireLass:

You can have as much health care available as you want....you can't make anyone seek help. Why don't those people seek help? Well, if they're male, society has pounded into them that it's not manly to be emotional. It's not manly to need help. It's really not manly to need emotional help. They don't know how to ask for the help they need. Someone needs to be the voice for them.


NWP
by guerrilla girl on Mar. 24, 2013 at 10:17 PM
1 mom liked this

Combine that with the length of time that vets have to wait to even be eligible for services now and we have a big problem.

I have always wondered why there wasn't some kind of debriefing combined with access to mental and physical health services for our service people when they leave active duty.

Quoting EireLass:

It is out there. Advocates are strangers. Can you imagine a guy who has an emotional disorder, having some 'advocate' stranger call them up or come to their home and start talking to them about a possible issue? Family and friends need to do this. Every hospital has a mental health department. Every VA hospital has one. There are many practitioners already out there. Take Vets for instance. They don't really know how to ask for help. When they are done with their tour, there is no 'talk down'....they're just 'out there'. Left to deal with everything they've seen and been through. Families don't want to acknowledge that someone in their family has issues. They take it personally and feel it's a reflection on them, and don't get the help needed. "What would the neighbors say". If things get ugly, they don't take the necessary steps. They're afraid to call the police who would bring a person to the hospital. The stigma is bigger than what people can deal with....so they just stay in denial, or they ignore it.

Quoting GeekMommi:

 I think parents and families can get help for their loved ones if available to them.  Wouldn't more health care put more advocates out there for people with mental issues. 

Quoting EireLass:

You can have as much health care available as you want....you can't make anyone seek help. Why don't those people seek help? Well, if they're male, society has pounded into them that it's not manly to be emotional. It's not manly to need help. It's really not manly to need emotional help. They don't know how to ask for the help they need. Someone needs to be the voice for them.



Neon Washable Paint

FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Mar. 24, 2013 at 10:47 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting NWP:

Combine that with the length of time that vets have to wait to even be eligible for services now and we have a big problem.

I have always wondered why there wasn't some kind of debriefing combined with access to mental and physical health services for our service people when they leave active duty.

Quoting EireLass:

It is out there. Advocates are strangers. Can you imagine a guy who has an emotional disorder, having some 'advocate' stranger call them up or come to their home and start talking to them about a possible issue? Family and friends need to do this. Every hospital has a mental health department. Every VA hospital has one. There are many practitioners already out there. Take Vets for instance. They don't really know how to ask for help. When they are done with their tour, there is no 'talk down'....they're just 'out there'. Left to deal with everything they've seen and been through. Families don't want to acknowledge that someone in their family has issues. They take it personally and feel it's a reflection on them, and don't get the help needed. "What would the neighbors say". If things get ugly, they don't take the necessary steps. They're afraid to call the police who would bring a person to the hospital. The stigma is bigger than what people can deal with....so they just stay in denial, or they ignore it.

Quoting GeekMommi:

 I think parents and families can get help for their loved ones if available to them.  Wouldn't more health care put more advocates out there for people with mental issues. 

Quoting EireLass:

You can have as much health care available as you want....you can't make anyone seek help. Why don't those people seek help? Well, if they're male, society has pounded into them that it's not manly to be emotional. It's not manly to need help. It's really not manly to need emotional help. They don't know how to ask for the help they need. Someone needs to be the voice for them.



There is a debriefing and classes which provide information to those leaving active duty.  Now, the content and the road to access may be some thing to look in to but it is indeed offered.  Certain debriefings and classes are mandatory upon leaving active duty.

You can lead a horse to water but you cannot make them drink.  How we go about making them drink, I haven't a clue.   Family and friends and support is helpful but even with all of that, not every one is going to seek help.

I do feel that there should be more avenues open for our young.  Those who show sure signs of mental illness.  It can be difficult for their parents to get them the help that may actually help, unless of course, that person commits a crime.  Money is a huge issue, as we all know.  Either the parents cannot afford the cost of the help.....or they cannot afford to continue the help once the insurance stops.

I have no answers to what we need to do for those who are in need of mental health care.  I wish I did.


GeekMommi
by on Mar. 24, 2013 at 10:48 PM

So you don't feel more health care will help. Curious, what is your position on guns? 


Quoting EireLass:

It is out there. Advocates are strangers. Can you imagine a guy who has an emotional disorder, having some 'advocate' stranger call them up or come to their home and start talking to them about a possible issue? Family and friends need to do this. Every hospital has a mental health department. Every VA hospital has one. There are many practitioners already out there. Take Vets for instance. They don't really know how to ask for help. When they are done with their tour, there is no 'talk down'....they're just 'out there'. Left to deal with everything they've seen and been through. Families don't want to acknowledge that someone in their family has issues. They take it personally and feel it's a reflection on them, and don't get the help needed. "What would the neighbors say". If things get ugly, they don't take the necessary steps. They're afraid to call the police who would bring a person to the hospital. The stigma is bigger than what people can deal with....so they just stay in denial, or they ignore it.

Quoting GeekMommi:

 I think parents and families can get help for their loved ones if available to them.  Wouldn't more health care put more advocates out there for people with mental issues. 

Quoting EireLass:

You can have as much health care available as you want....you can't make anyone seek help. Why don't those people seek help? Well, if they're male, society has pounded into them that it's not manly to be emotional. It's not manly to need help. It's really not manly to need emotional help. They don't know how to ask for the help they need. Someone needs to be the voice for them.




AMBG825
by on Mar. 25, 2013 at 6:36 AM

 

Quoting NewMom11222011:

There is still a stigma in our country about needing mental health services, although a huge percentage of people have one or more MH diagnoses.

 There will always be a stigma as long as there are people wanting to limit what you are allowed to do if you have a mental health issue. People have had their kids taken from them because of mental health issues. (My state still has laws on the books stating your parental rights can be involuntarily terminated over a mental illness.) People want to take guns away from those with mental illness no matter how inane. People can be put in a facility and have their homes taken from them for having a mental illness.

 

Of course people don't want to be diagnosed with a mental illness. As long as we take everything from them and shove them in a corner somewhere, there will always be a stigma.






 

Carpy
by Ruby Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 6:42 AM

Most people who are of the mind to do a mass shooting, do not believe they need help.

Quoting EireLass:

You can have as much health care available as you want....you can't make anyone seek help. Why don't those people seek help? Well, if they're male, society has pounded into them that it's not manly to be emotional. It's not manly to need help. It's really not manly to need emotional help. They don't know how to ask for the help they need. Someone needs to be the voice for them.


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