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U.S. Gov. Fighting to deny Asylum to German Homeschool

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Still having problems with CM's site. I heard about this on the news a day ago. I found this very interesting. A German family came over to the U.S. so they can homeschool their children. In Germany the Gov. probids homeschooling in most cases. In Germany their reasons appears to be that the Gov. wants to prohibit people who think differently from the Gov. on religious or philosophical grounds (from growing & developing into a force in society). Our Gov. only will let someone stay here if they have fear of danger in their own Country. Here's a few articles on this case. What are your thoughts? http://www.lifesitenews.com/news/u.s.-government-fighting-to-deny-asylum-to-german-homeschool-family http://www.hslda.org/does/news/2013/201302110.asp
by on Mar. 25, 2013 at 1:20 PM
Replies (11-20):
Raintree
by Ruby Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 2:34 PM
2 moms liked this

No.

Germany has a very high standard of living. There is no 'fear for life' involved, and until home schooling becomes a protected class- they haven't got a case. There are home schoolers that are pretty rabid about what they do- I'm pretty sure that is the type of person behind this story. 

They're free to come here if they want to go through immigration the correct way- not just the "we're persecuted in Germany!" kind of way. Not every country can send 'refugee status' immigrants. Germany isn't one of them.

Quoting Naturewoman4:

Yes, that was my thought as well. But, then my question would be how is it that some are able to stay here in the U.S. & others aren't. Is it because those that come here are in fear for their life. If people come to this Country for the sole purpose of having a better life & providing a better life for their children, wouldn't this fit into the same category? Just curious does Holder always get involved in fighting asylum for some or all? There is a lot of people that come to this Country, because of all the freedom we have here. Not solely because they are in fear of their life where they came from. So, what makes this case any different?
Quoting Raintree:


Quoting Naturewoman4:

The writer of this article wanted to have insight on our own Gov. views towards the rights of homeschooling parents in general.  The U.S. law of asylum allows a refugee to stay in the U.S. permanently if he can show that he/she is being persecuted for one of several specific reasons.  Among these are persecution for 'religious' reasons & persecution of a "particular social group".  It is thought control of its people.  Belief control.  It is totalitarianism dressed up in politically correct lingo.  (according to the writer of this article). 

I'm assuming that the government acknowledges persecution only when it threatens life or comes close to that. Which this does not.

Persecution as a word has been used and flattened out to mean everything from not hearing Merry Christmas at Target the day after Thanksgiving to all out genocide of a specific ethnic group.

I don't think that homeschooling fits into a protected group as of yet- in terms of human rights. If they want to homeschool they should work on changing the laws in Germany.



terpmama
by Silver Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 2:38 PM


There's a difference in emigrating and hen immigrating (a long and expensive process) and being granted asylum (quick and relatively cheap). These folks are trying to get asylum, the people who want to be citizens because they want a better life are immigrants.

Quoting Naturewoman4:

Yes, that was my thought as well. But, then my question would be how is it that some are able to stay here in the U.S. & others aren't. Is it because those that come here are in fear for their life. If people come to this Country for the sole purpose of having a better life & providing a better life for their children, wouldn't this fit into the same category? Just curious does Holder always get involved in fighting asylum for some or all? There is a lot of people that come to this Country, because of all the freedom we have here. Not solely because they are in fear of their life where they came from. So, what makes this case any different?
Quoting Raintree:


Quoting Naturewoman4:

The writer of this article wanted to have insight on our own Gov. views towards the rights of homeschooling parents in general.  The U.S. law of asylum allows a refugee to stay in the U.S. permanently if he can show that he/she is being persecuted for one of several specific reasons.  Among these are persecution for 'religious' reasons & persecution of a "particular social group".  It is thought control of its people.  Belief control.  It is totalitarianism dressed up in politically correct lingo.  (according to the writer of this article). 

I'm assuming that the government acknowledges persecution only when it threatens life or comes close to that. Which this does not.

Persecution as a word has been used and flattened out to mean everything from not hearing Merry Christmas at Target the day after Thanksgiving to all out genocide of a specific ethnic group.

I don't think that homeschooling fits into a protected group as of yet- in terms of human rights. If they want to homeschool they should work on changing the laws in Germany.




autodidact
by Platinum Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 2:45 PM

They don't qualify because they're not persecuted group. There are asylum-seekers with far more pressing circumstances.

autodidact
by Platinum Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 2:47 PM


Um . . .  what? What does the Bill of Rights have to do with it? And actually I think most people are aware that the Bill of Rights is United States document not one which is applicable to the entire world.

Quoting Donna6503:

Not very many people realize that Europe doesn't have a "Bill of Rights" like we do, here in the "Land of Round Doorknobs."






Donna6503
by Platinum Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 2:55 PM
The reason why it is in quotation marks is because, the notion that "free speech," "free associations," "free press," "etc., isn't as fundamental as a right in Europe as it is here in the states.

Hard to explain, but the there is a difference in regards to a right than what is compared to here in the US


Quoting autodidact:


Um . . .  what? What does the Bill of Rights have to do with it? And actually I think most people are aware that the Bill of Rights is United States document not one which is applicable to the entire world.


Quoting Donna6503:

Not very many people realize that Europe doesn't have a "Bill of Rights" like we do, here in the "Land of Round Doorknobs."







Posted on CafeMom Mobile
autodidact
by Platinum Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 3:00 PM


I didn't ask Why it was in quotes, I was questioning your assertion that most people think the Bill of Rights is universally applicable.

I understand that rights vary from country to country, what I don't understand is what any of this has to do with homeschooling or considering homeschoolers a persecuted class qualifying for asylum.

Quoting Donna6503:

The reason why it is in quotation marks is because, the notion that "free speech," "free associations," "free press," "etc., isn't as fundamental as a right in Europe as it is here in the states.

Hard to explain, but the there is a difference in regards to a right than what is compared to here in the US


Quoting autodidact:


Um . . .  what? What does the Bill of Rights have to do with it? And actually I think most people are aware that the Bill of Rights is United States document not one which is applicable to the entire world.


Quoting Donna6503:

Not very many people realize that Europe doesn't have a "Bill of Rights" like we do, here in the "Land of Round Doorknobs."












DragonMother10
by on Mar. 25, 2013 at 3:03 PM
My husband is originally from Germany and he was one of those people that sometimes went against the government or argued with them. He came to this country LEGALLY, even though it took him 7 years. In some ways Germany is better than the U.S., and vice versa. It's not that horrible to live there to live in fear, it's no longer Nazi Germany. My husband didn't live in fear, just didn't agree with the.government all the time. Plus his family lives here and wanted to be closer to them.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Naturewoman4
by Platinum Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 3:10 PM
Thank-You for your post, I was hoping to get others that came here from Germany or even any other Countries. So, then I was not understanding I guess, why this family specifically is being fought by our Gov./Holder to send them back? I wonder if this family has started the process to become a legal citizen here.
Quoting DragonMother10:

My husband is originally from Germany and he was one of those people that sometimes went against the government or argued with them. He came to this country LEGALLY, even though it took him 7 years. In some ways Germany is better than the U.S., and vice versa. It's not that horrible to live there to live in fear, it's no longer Nazi Germany. My husband didn't live in fear, just didn't agree with the.government all the time. Plus his family lives here and wanted to be closer to them.

Goodwoman614
by Satan on Mar. 25, 2013 at 3:20 PM



Quoting Naturewoman4:

Thank-You for your post, I was hoping to get others that came here from Germany or even any other Countries. So, then I was not understanding I guess, why this family specifically is being fought by our Gov./Holder to send them back? I wonder if this family has started the process to become a legal citizen here.
Quoting DragonMother10:

My husband is originally from Germany and he was one of those people that sometimes went against the government or argued with them. He came to this country LEGALLY, even though it took him 7 years. In some ways Germany is better than the U.S., and vice versa. It's not that horrible to live there to live in fear, it's no longer Nazi Germany. My husband didn't live in fear, just didn't agree with the.government all the time. Plus his family lives here and wanted to be closer to them.

And you're hoping to get another post up over the 200 mark, even though 50-75% of the comments are yours, replying (sometimes multiple times) to each & every comment


Naturewoman4
by Platinum Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 3:20 PM
I guess this process is confusing to me. So, are you saying there is a difference between immigrating & seeking asylum? Seems all the same to me. I always thought when people want to come here, is because they want a better life for themselves & their family. They want the freedoms we have here, that a lot of other countries don't have. So, seeking asylum is what this family is seeking, because it is cheaper & a shorter process. If they are denied asylum then they are automatically sent back to their country? Yet, we have here in this country millions of illegals living here & some many, many yrs., from all over the World yet they don't get sent back. I'm not understanding this. Why then doesn't this family since they are here already, just stay like all the millions of other illegals?
Quoting terpmama:


There's a difference in emigrating and hen immigrating (a long and expensive process) and being granted asylum (quick and relatively cheap). These folks are trying to get asylum, the people who want to be citizens because they want a better life are immigrants.

Quoting Naturewoman4:

Yes, that was my thought as well. But, then my question would be how is it that some are able to stay here in the U.S. & others aren't. Is it because those that come here are in fear for their life. If people come to this Country for the sole purpose of having a better life & providing a better life for their children, wouldn't this fit into the same category? Just curious does Holder always get involved in fighting asylum for some or all? There is a lot of people that come to this Country, because of all the freedom we have here. Not solely because they are in fear of their life where they came from. So, what makes this case any different?
Quoting Raintree:


Quoting Naturewoman4:

The writer of this article wanted to have insight on our own Gov. views towards the rights of homeschooling parents in general.  The U.S. law of asylum allows a refugee to stay in the U.S. permanently if he can show that he/she is being persecuted for one of several specific reasons.  Among these are persecution for 'religious' reasons & persecution of a "particular social group".  It is thought control of its people.  Belief control.  It is totalitarianism dressed up in politically correct lingo.  (according to the writer of this article). 

I'm assuming that the government acknowledges persecution only when it threatens life or comes close to that. Which this does not.

Persecution as a word has been used and flattened out to mean everything from not hearing Merry Christmas at Target the day after Thanksgiving to all out genocide of a specific ethnic group.

I don't think that homeschooling fits into a protected group as of yet- in terms of human rights. If they want to homeschool they should work on changing the laws in Germany.





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