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Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Inequality towards women.

Posted by on Apr. 1, 2013 at 11:15 AM
  • 70 Replies
I am truly interested in personal experiences, if anyone wants to share.
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by on Apr. 1, 2013 at 11:15 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Peanutx3
by Ruby Member on Apr. 1, 2013 at 11:40 AM
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I don't have any real personal experiences only that in college my advisor strongly urged me to change my major and look towards getting a job at a hospital rather than focus on a science job with say the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  He said they would not hire a woman to work on their boats.

parentalrights1
by on Apr. 1, 2013 at 11:44 AM
2 moms liked this
Do you mean legally? Socially? General?

Definitely huge inequality as far as double standards regarding sexuality. We all experience that
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Carpy
by Ruby Member on Apr. 1, 2013 at 11:49 AM
All of the above.

Quoting parentalrights1:

Do you mean legally? Socially? General?



Definitely huge inequality as far as double standards regarding sexuality. We all experience that
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lizzielouaf
by Gold Member on Apr. 1, 2013 at 11:50 AM
4 moms liked this
Going back around 15 years-ish I was up for a first chair promotion. It would have meant a decent bump in salary. I was called into the Sr. partners office and told it was given to my male co-worker (remember this was before you couldn't say this kinda thing out loud) because, when it came down to it, "he had a family to support and I could rely on my husband's money." Less than a year later I was hired away to a new firm but that day always kinda sticks in the back of my mind.
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GLWerth
by Gina on Apr. 1, 2013 at 11:52 AM
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When I worked at a bank, longer ago than I want to think about now, one of my duties was to process new hire information. New male tellers were always paid more than new female tellers, by at least a dollar an hour. Generally, education and experience was equal. Males were promoted out of the teller line very quickly, while females had to show that they were beyond exceptional and then, often they would not be promoted because they were "needed" on the line.

Also, all the managers were male. Every. Single. One. Yet, at least 80% of the workforce was female.

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Apr. 1, 2013 at 11:56 AM

*shrug*

I've experienced differences in the way people may treat me, because of my sex, but I do not feel it is "inequality" and I wouldn't classify it as a bad experience, merely that it was *different*.

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff: we have traditional gender roles, we're Catholic, I'm Libertarian, he's Republican, we're both conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee














Donna6503
by Platinum Member on Apr. 1, 2013 at 12:10 PM
In high school, I received a scholarship to attent Stanford; but, a teacher who I highly respected, even wrote a letter of recommendation for me. He was an older Hespanic man. He was the English (and a Spanish) teacher in our school.

When he advise me, not to attent Stanford; I was heartbroken, I thought it was all because I was a girl. But, he did have the same conversation with another person, who happend to be a boy (but it was a different university)

He talked with me, trying to convince me that I wasn't ready for Stanford. He was the only one telling me not to go; I ended up listening to him, not my family, other teachers, my church and friends, etc. Because, I indeed, wasn't ready, I did go to a junior college and I did eventually get my four year degree (and such)

But, looking back I noticed how hard he worked to convince me that he was right. I didn't get that feeling he did the same with the boy. That boy did ended up dropping out of college. I've often wondered why he worked so hard for his inequitable push from his two students of separate gender.
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Stephanie329
by Platinum Member on Apr. 1, 2013 at 12:12 PM
Goodness, let me think. I've grown up in a time that has changed quite a bit.

I remember hearing sexist comments all the time as a child. I hear them now, mostly here though. That means woman do it to each other.
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Carpy
by Ruby Member on Apr. 1, 2013 at 12:14 PM
Is that still the practice there? My SIL retited as a bank manager about 10 yrs ago.

Quoting GLWerth:

When I worked at a bank, longer ago than I want to think about now, one of my duties was to process new hire information. New male tellers were always paid more than new female tellers, by at least a dollar an hour. Generally, education and experience was equal. Males were promoted out of the teller line very quickly, while females had to show that they were beyond exceptional and then, often they would not be promoted because they were "needed" on the line.


Also, all the managers were male. Every. Single. One. Yet, at least 80% of the workforce was female.

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GLWerth
by Gina on Apr. 1, 2013 at 12:25 PM
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I don't know. We moved out of that city and I haven't been back to the bank since then. It has also been bought out several times since I left, which can alter company culture significantly.

But, at the time, I found it very interesting and a little disturbing.

Quoting Carpy:

Is that still the practice there? My SIL retited as a bank manager about 10 yrs ago.

Quoting GLWerth:

When I worked at a bank, longer ago than I want to think about now, one of my duties was to process new hire information. New male tellers were always paid more than new female tellers, by at least a dollar an hour. Generally, education and experience was equal. Males were promoted out of the teller line very quickly, while females had to show that they were beyond exceptional and then, often they would not be promoted because they were "needed" on the line.


Also, all the managers were male. Every. Single. One. Yet, at least 80% of the workforce was female.


 

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