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Marriage is more than a piece of paper: ‘Playing house is not a good look,’ ex-girlfriend of ‘Sesame Street’ actor learns lesson the hard way

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‘Playing house is not a good look,’ the ex-girlfriend of ‘Sesame Street’ actor Roscoe Orman learns that lesson the hard way

Here’s a sad tale of another woman having to learn the hard way that living together as husband and wife is not the same thing as being husband and wife.


Here’s a sad tale of another woman having to learn the hard way that living together as husband and wife is not the same thing as being husband and wife.

Sharon Orman, the partner of “Sesame Street” actor Roscoe Orman for close to 40 years and the mother of his 4 children, is claiming that the actor left her destitute after all these years to marry another woman.

Roscoe played Gordon Robinson, one of the original residents of Sesame Street on the TV program of the same name. On the show Robinson was teacher who lived with his wife Sharon. The idyllic life of marital bliss that Robinson created on the show could have been a mirror or his life at home with his real life Sharon–the only problem was that Orman never actually married the woman whom he spent decades with in a real-life relationship.

Yes, you read that correctly. In 40 years and after 4 children Roscoe never actually bothered to marry Sharon Orman. Ms. Orman even legally changed her last name to Orman. According to her, she had no idea that the man whom she referred to as her “husband” had taken up with another woman until she found pictures of said woman on her ex’s telephone.

Eventually Roscoe left Sharon and legally married the woman whose pictures Sharon discovered–Kimberley LaMarque Orman.

Sharon and Roscoe Orman during happier times

Sharon and Roscoe Orman during happier times

Currently Sharon Orman says that she is sleeping on the couch of one of her children. Her ex has not only cut off contact with her, but she claims he doesn’t even make contact with his children anymore.

But Ms. Orman isn’t taking her treatment at the hands of Roscoe lying down. She filed a complaint against her ex in New Jersey Superior Court. She claims that because they were “living together as husband and wife for almost 40 years,” she is entitled to spousal support.

The court has yet to rule on Ms. Orman’s complaint, but it is unlikely that she will be receiving any financial support from her ex. New Jersey, the state the couple resided in for the entirety of their relationship, does not recognize common law marriage.

Common law marriage NJ is not permitted. The state of New Jersey does not allow for the creation of common law marriage as a relationship in which a couple lives together without participating in a formal/lawful ceremony. Unlike other states in the U.S.; however, New Jersey does not allow a couple to acquire marital rights by living together for a specified period of time. As such, a couple will not be required to pursuit a legal action to end such a bond if said relationship was created in New Jersey.

Although Common Law Marriage New Jersey is not practiced in the state, New Jersey does recognized as valid, common law marriages created outside of the state, if the legal requirements of those states are fulfilled.

Mr. Orman’s Wikipedia entry lists Kimberley LaMarque Orman as the only spouse the actor has ever had. And if Wikipedia doesn’t even recognize Sharon’s relationship with Roscoe as being ‘official’–Wikipedia, which allows anyone to makes edits and obviously has a much lower bar set to establish “truth” than any legal institution–I don’t see how the state of New Jersey will accept their relationship as having any legal bearing either.

Source:”EXCLUSIVE: ‘Sesame Street’ star Roscoe Orman leaves ex ‘destitute’“–New York Post
Image via the New York Post

http://www.beyondblackwhite.com/playing-house-good-look-ex-girlfriend-sesame-street-actor-roscoe-orman-learns-lesson-hard/

by on Apr. 1, 2013 at 10:34 PM
Replies (141-150):
Tarot
by Tea on Apr. 3, 2013 at 2:00 PM


Quoting PamR:



Quoting Tarot:


Quoting PamR:


Rights of inheritence?  Proving paternitiy?  What if the father doesn't want to cooperate and pay child support?  Is it easier to collect if the parents were married?

Inheritence can be taken care of via will, and many states (not sure if they all do or not) assume paternity if the father has raised the child as his own for an x number of years. Marriage has little to do with it. 

Right, but if the father chooses to walk away and doesn't name a child in a will (or doesn't have a will) and didn't raise the child, that could present a problem.  Personally, I would make sure everything was legally spelled out.  I'm sure this woman didn't see Gordon walking away after 40 years.  You just never know.

That still doesn't have much to do with marriage. It's an issue of paternity.

Do you bury me when I'm gone? 
Do you teach me while I'm here? 
Just as soon as I belong 
Then it's time I disappear

PamR
by Pam on Apr. 3, 2013 at 4:03 PM



Quoting Tarot:


Quoting PamR:



Quoting Tarot:


Quoting PamR:


Rights of inheritence?  Proving paternitiy?  What if the father doesn't want to cooperate and pay child support?  Is it easier to collect if the parents were married?

Inheritence can be taken care of via will, and many states (not sure if they all do or not) assume paternity if the father has raised the child as his own for an x number of years. Marriage has little to do with it. 

Right, but if the father chooses to walk away and doesn't name a child in a will (or doesn't have a will) and didn't raise the child, that could present a problem.  Personally, I would make sure everything was legally spelled out.  I'm sure this woman didn't see Gordon walking away after 40 years.  You just never know.

That still doesn't have much to do with marriage. It's an issue of paternity.

That's true.  Traditionally, marriage was more of a legal (not romantic) institution that was in place to protect offspring.  Things are different now, however, I still think that children born within a marriage probably have more legal protection.



ReginaStar
by Gold Member on Apr. 3, 2013 at 4:47 PM

The piece of paper is a legal contract. I would think most realize that. 

Tarot
by Tea on Apr. 3, 2013 at 5:04 PM


Quoting PamR:



Quoting Tarot:

That still doesn't have much to do with marriage. It's an issue of paternity.

That's true.  Traditionally, marriage was more of a legal (not romantic) institution that was in place to protect offspring.  Things are different now, however, I still think that children born within a marriage probably have more legal protection.

Things are different because genetic paternity is much more important than it used to be. Just 100 years ago, a child born in wedlock was automatically the husband's, whether it was biologically his or not. That's not the case anymore. 

There's pros and cons to the change in mentality, but ultimately I think children need love more than they need married parents.

Do you bury me when I'm gone? 
Do you teach me while I'm here? 
Just as soon as I belong 
Then it's time I disappear

tambrathegreat
by on Apr. 3, 2013 at 6:28 PM

Well, if she's too stupid to hire a lawyer to take him to task for the years they were together, then that's on her.  Palimony isn't just a Califarnia concept.

LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Apr. 4, 2013 at 12:48 AM

It's true it doesn't have much to do with paternity, but in most jurisdictions there are, absolutely, rights of survivorship (for spouses) which place legal limitations on whether or not a spouse can be left out of a will... or if the legal next of kin can contest it.

In common-law marriage (and all other non-marriage forms of peer relationships), there are no such protections. No matter what you want to happen in the event of your death, your next-of-kin (parents, children, even quite distant cousins) can make decisions and dispute completely legal wills, often successfully, in court.

Without a marriage making the spouse the closest next-of-kin, no partner has anything like the rights of a widow/er.

Quoting Tarot:


Quoting PamR:



Quoting Tarot:


Quoting PamR:


Rights of inheritence?  Proving paternitiy?  What if the father doesn't want to cooperate and pay child support?  Is it easier to collect if the parents were married?

Inheritence can be taken care of via will, and many states (not sure if they all do or not) assume paternity if the father has raised the child as his own for an x number of years. Marriage has little to do with it. 

Right, but if the father chooses to walk away and doesn't name a child in a will (or doesn't have a will) and didn't raise the child, that could present a problem.  Personally, I would make sure everything was legally spelled out.  I'm sure this woman didn't see Gordon walking away after 40 years.  You just never know.

That still doesn't have much to do with marriage. It's an issue of paternity.


Diane1223
by Member on Apr. 5, 2013 at 8:04 PM
I am very traditional, and believe that if you are going to live the married life, then get married. My spouse and I were together for 10 mos., got engaged, then got married 6 mos. later. We have been married for almost 2 years, and we are expecting our first child, a girl, on June 12th.
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shylynn22
by Member on Apr. 5, 2013 at 8:08 PM
And this is exactly why it upsets me when people say it's just a piece of paper. It's not! Obviously!
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radioheid
by Libertarian on Apr. 5, 2013 at 8:12 PM

 As much as I hate marriage, if you're looking to swipe half of someone's shit when the relationship ends, its probably a good idea to get married.


"Roger that. Over."

R   A   D    I    O    H    E    I    D

futureshock
by Ruby Member on Apr. 6, 2013 at 12:34 AM
1 mom liked this


Quoting radioheid:

 As much as I hate marriage, if you're looking to swipe half of someone's shit when the relationship ends, its probably a good idea to get married.

I don't look at it like that at all.  I look at it as protecting what you have built together as a couple, regardless of which person had a paying job. 

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