Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

New Google Glass videocam (ie SPYCAM)....have you guys seen this?

Posted by on Apr. 8, 2013 at 10:11 AM
  • 10 Replies

This is ridiculous. Just what we need...people filming us without our knowledge. *sigh*


From strip clubs to theaters, Google Glass won't be welcome everywhere

Sign

Rosa Golijan / NBC News

If an establishment prohibits cameras, it won't welcome Google Glass.

Google's futuristic Glass headgear will be available before year's end. The device may well be the final step before human-machine interaction moves under our skin — but its wearers may trigger some undesired social reactions from friends and family members, and it may not go over too well at your local watering hole, either. In fact, judging from our early look, Google Glass won't be welcome in lots of places.

Google Glass consists of a small display situated on a frame that resembles eyeglasses. It is connected to a camera, microphone and bone-conducting speaker. Glass pairs with your smartphone wirelessly using Bluetooth, but also can use Wi-Fi to access the Internet. You can use your voice or your finger to get it to take photos, record video, initiate video or voice chats, send messages, search Google and translate words or phrases. Google's being a bit coy about the ship date for this groundbreaking wearable computer. However, while qualifying early adopters are paying $1,500 a pop for the privilege of owning it first, we're told that it will become more widely available by year's end — with a slightly more affordable price tag.

One of the reasons Glass will find itself unwelcome in places is because its camera lives at the wearer's eye level. It takes photos or record videos without a red blinking light telling others it's happening. Anywhere cameras and other recording devices are unwelcome, the same would most certainly go for Google Glass.

For starters, you can forget about taking Glass to Las Vegas.

Google co-founder Sergey Brin, left, wears Google Glass glasses at an announcement for the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences at Genentech Hall on UC...

Jeff Chiu / AP

Google co-founder Sergey Brin, left, wearing Google Glass.

"We've been dealing with the cellphone videoing and the picture taking over the years and we are quick to make sure that that doesn't happen in the club," Peter Feinstein, managing partner of Sapphire Gentlemen's Club in Las Vegas, told NBC News, explaining that hosts check in any electronics a patron brings that could be used for filming.

"As the sale of [Google Glass] spreads, there'll be more people using them and wanting to use them at places such as a gentlemen's club," Feinstein explained. "If we see those in the club, we would do the same thing that we do to people who bring cameras into the club."

And if somebody refuses to doff his or her headset? "If they don't want to check it, we'd be happy to give them a limo ride back to their hotel," Feinstein says.

Casinos are another place where surreptitious recording equipment won't be welcome.

"Picture-taking is frowned upon, and security officers on duty ask individuals not to take pictures for the privacy of others in the casino," a spokesperson for MGM Resorts said. "This new product is nothing new in terms of a challenge for us, because for so many years, the very tiniest of portable lipstick and pinpoint cameras have been around."

She added that "resort security officers are trained to monitor for, and detect, anything that they suspect might be a filming device, and will ask the patron to discontinue shooting photos or filming."

We spoke to several other casinos and adult entertainment establishments — in and out of Las Vegas — and found a general consensus: You are welcome, but your Google Glass must stay outside.

How about movie theaters?

"No recording devices (cameras, video recorders, sound recorders, etc.) are permitted to be used within any Regal Entertainment Group facility," the admittance procedures for the Regal Entertainment Group plainly state.

While a spokesperson for the group — as well as one for AMC Theaters — looked into the particular methods that may be used for dealing with Glass, no definitive answer was available.

We encountered a lot of that as we made calls for this piece: From the TSA to Bank of America, spokespeople were not yet ready to speak to the particulars of Google Glass, but reiterated general statements about protecting the privacy and personal information of staff and customers alike.

And while businesses and agencies have an interest in controlling what goes on within their boundaries, a whole other area of Google Glass concern has to do with what happens in public places, where people of all ages congregate.

"My immediate concern for [Google Glass] was from a sexual predator view point," Drew Donofrio, a private investigator who previously ran a computer crimes unit for 12 years at the Bergen County, N.J., police department, told NBC News. "Locker rooms, bathrooms, playgrounds ... all [Glass] requires is a line of sight."

"You can look innocent enough in line of sight, when you're not holding up a camcorder," Donofrio explained. "When you have this type of technology, it looks innocuous."

We reached out to parks and recreation departments across the country to see if they would treat Glass any differently than existing recording devices. Like others, park management was not ready to make any official calls. Many did say that they will monitor the gadget's development and adjust policies if necessary in the future.


by on Apr. 8, 2013 at 10:11 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
cjsbmom
by Lois Lane on Apr. 8, 2013 at 3:17 PM

BUMP!

LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Apr. 8, 2013 at 3:33 PM

Yeah... this is going to be impossible to enforce, within less than 10 years. They will be so tiny, the technology will have to move toward digital shielding of some kind rather than controlling the devices...

cjsbmom
by Lois Lane on Apr. 8, 2013 at 4:02 PM

It will make it so much easier for perverts, too. Want to snap someone in the bathroom? Just wear in your Google device. 

Why do we even need this stuff? 

Quoting LindaClement:

Yeah... this is going to be impossible to enforce, within less than 10 years. They will be so tiny, the technology will have to move toward digital shielding of some kind rather than controlling the devices...



LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Apr. 8, 2013 at 6:19 PM

Like it's hard for perverts now? Like it's ever been 'hard' for perverts?

I refuse to have my rights, freedom, or my access to cool technology, restricted because some people are nuts.

If that was the justification for anything, no one would be allowed out of their houses, in daylight or nighttime.

I hang our clothes on the line --all of them, even the underwear. Even when the girls were young, even when they were teens wearing t-backs. Why? Because if perverts get their yayas from looking at underwear on the line, that's their business not mine. Hiding it contributes to the 'forbidden fruit' aspect of the subject, and since they can get catalogues and real ones sent to their homes, or visit any mall in the country to see it on open display, I'm not going to spend 8 seconds of mental energy a year fretting about it.

Quoting cjsbmom:

It will make it so much easier for perverts, too. Want to snap someone in the bathroom? Just wear in your Google device. 

Why do we even need this stuff? 

Quoting LindaClement:

Yeah... this is going to be impossible to enforce, within less than 10 years. They will be so tiny, the technology will have to move toward digital shielding of some kind rather than controlling the devices...



NWP
by guerrilla girl on Apr. 8, 2013 at 7:26 PM
1 mom liked this
We live in a new reality that does not include privacy. Like it or not, we will need to adjust.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Apr. 8, 2013 at 8:01 PM

‘Stop The Cyborgs’ was founded in response to the Google Glass project and other technology trends. The aim of the movement is to stop a future in which privacy is impossible and central control total.

If the government installed CCTV cameras and microphones everywhere, all feeding information to a central control room you would probably characterize it as a privacy risk. Is it any better if its run by a corporation and the devices are attached to people’s heads. Or if it uses human spy drones, which are socially incentivised to share information rather than automatic drones?

Google Glasses are a glasses like wearable computer which can act as a video camera so using these or similar devices someone might be filming you and uploading it to the internet without you knowing. (While there is a red indicator light its pretty subtle) The glasses have access to information on the internet so a stranger could look at you and might (depending on features) know all about you without you being aware. The Glasses can be fed contextual information by ‘Google Now‘ this gives Google’s algorithms real power to influence real world choices and perceptions. We don’t want a total ban but do we want people to limit it’s use.

We are also asking Google, other device makers and law makers to make a commitment that:

  • They will never allow any face recognition system or any app which automatically identifies people to work on Google Glass or on any server system connected to Glass.
  • They will implement a do not track system which allows people to opt out of being tracked or having information captured about them by Glass. This system should not require the person to identify themselves.
  • That all information gathered by Glass will remain the property of the owner or subject and will be encrypted so that it is impossible for it to be data-mined, made available to security services or used for commercial purposes.

Our objective is to start debate but we also want to encourage people to keep some space free of intrusive surveillance so that people can talk and behave freely its important for society and democracy that people can chat and live without fear that they might end up being published or prosecuted.

More generally we want people to realize that computer systems are not politically or socially neutral. They impact our lives, encourage and discourage certain behaviors but we typically don’t even question their design and intrinsic biases. Ordinary citizens need to get politically active in order to shape technology and the social norms around them. Don’t leave designing the future to the Geeks and the corporations.

What you can do.

  • Make your property and place of work a Google glass or surveillance device free zone by asking people to switch off their devices.
      • As a practical act which creates areas free of surveillance or highly intrusive surveillance.
      • As a symbolic act showing concern for privacy.
      • As a way of exerting social pressure to establish norms around usage.
      • As a way of exerting market pressure to discourage people from buying and companies developing these systems.
  • Write to your political representative and express your concerns.
  • There needs to be a mass movement which is pro-privacy. Set up a group in your local area and get together to debate and raise awareness.
  • If you are artistic, think about how you could approach the issue in art.
  • If you are technical think about how to build better more human, privacy preserving systems.

Disability rights & assistive devices

Some people may need to use assistive aids for example:

  • A visually impaired person may choose to use a wearable camera to assist them with navigation or reading.
  • Someone with Autism may choose to use a digital assistant that provides real-time assistance with reading faces during conversations.
  • Someone with memory problems may choose to use a device which assists their memory.

We ask that if you do ban Google Glass and similar devices from your property that you also respect the rights of such people and do not prevent them from using assistive devices if the data remains within the control of the individual.

The issue as we have pointed out elsewhere is not the device itself but rather ownership and control over the data and the network. We therefore urge the designers of devices to ensure that the needs of all people are taken into account. For example the use of encryption so that the data gathered by these devices remains within the control of the individual and is not aggregated, broadcast or stored longer than is necessary.

http://stopthecyborgs.org/about/

turtle68
by Mahinaarangi on Apr. 8, 2013 at 8:17 PM

I love technology...

we have to move with the times and accommodate things like this into our lives.

Themis_Defleo
by Bronze Member on Apr. 8, 2013 at 8:24 PM
I saw a demo severally this ago. I think they are neat - but I'm not sure I want to be that connected.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
cjsbmom
by Lois Lane on Apr. 8, 2013 at 9:50 PM
1 mom liked this

I know. I hate my Smartphone. I feel like I can't escape it. I couldn't imagine being this plugged in all the time. 

Quoting Themis_Defleo:

I saw a demo severally this ago. I think they are neat - but I'm not sure I want to be that connected.



MrsSamMerlotte
by Bronze Member on Apr. 8, 2013 at 9:55 PM
1 mom liked this
I can hardly remember what privacy feels like. And our kids will never experience privacy in their lives. How sad.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)