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Kindergartener banned from school because she doesnt have vaccines. piog

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http://www.silive.com/news/index.ssf/2013/04/without_vaccination_kindergart.html

I'm mobile and can't make it clicky but to those that use vaccine exemption,I guess it doesn't work in.every state.
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by on Apr. 8, 2013 at 6:20 PM
Replies (61-70):
Momniscient
by Ruby Member on Apr. 9, 2013 at 12:31 AM


Quoting katy_kay08:

Nope it doesn't work in every state and parents that make this choice need to be aware of the laws in their state.  


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TranquilMind
by Platinum Member on Apr. 9, 2013 at 12:35 AM

 You would think so, but I remember reading about New York, which is pretty hardcore fanatic about demanding vaccines and scrutinizing exemptions. 


Quoting notjstanothrmom:

And what about people who can't homeschool? It is silly to me that you wouldn't claim religion. Religion is personal belief. I didn't have to state what religion, just that it was against it. They cannot question it.

Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:


Quoting notjstanothrmom:

So you'd go against your personal belief that vaccines are not safe for your children and inject them just because you don't want to claim you're religious?

I used a religious exemption. I am Agnostic. They can kiss my ass. I am not going to inject my kid just becuase I have to lie.

Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:


Quoting purpleducky:

Ummmm...why not just use the religious exemption that is in place?

I wouldn't choose to be dishonest about it either


I would homeschool. That's me. I'm disappointed by your assumptions. =/



 

booklover74
by Bronze Member on Apr. 9, 2013 at 1:25 AM
Actually exemptions do work in every state. The medical exemption this mother and doctir chose simply didnt apply to the girl in question. It might be in the exact way the doctir worded the exemption that disqualified the girl. If shevappeals and the doctor reads up a bit on particular wording for an exemption then she may find her daughter qualifues for a medical exemptiin. She could have chosen to use a religious exemption but decided that didnt apply to her either.

Exemptions work in every state, you simply have to understand them, the rules for them, follow the proper paperwork and wording fir them in order to qualify for them.
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notjstanothrmom
by Bronze Member on Apr. 9, 2013 at 4:09 AM
2 moms liked this
I know exemptions I'm some states require signature from your religious leadee of whatever kind. Thankfully not so in CT.

I personally don't even know why people should have to explain to anyone why they don't or won't vaccinate.


Quoting TranquilMind:

 You would think so, but I remember reading about New York, which is pretty hardcore fanatic about demanding vaccines and scrutinizing exemptions. 




Quoting notjstanothrmom:


And what about people who can't homeschool? It is silly to me that you wouldn't claim religion. Religion is personal belief. I didn't have to state what religion, just that it was against it. They cannot question it.


Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:




Quoting notjstanothrmom:


So you'd go against your personal belief that vaccines are not safe for your children and inject them just because you don't want to claim you're religious?


I used a religious exemption. I am Agnostic. They can kiss my ass. I am not going to inject my kid just becuase I have to lie.


Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:




Quoting purpleducky:


Ummmm...why not just use the religious exemption that is in place?


I wouldn't choose to be dishonest about it either




I would homeschool. That's me. I'm disappointed by your assumptions. =/






 

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Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Apr. 9, 2013 at 7:27 AM


Quoting notjstanothrmom:

And what about people who can't homeschool? It is silly to me that you wouldn't claim religion. Religion is personal belief. I didn't have to state what religion, just that it was against it. They cannot question it.


I find it silly that you want to have a conversation with me because I stated that I wouldn't be dishonest. I certainly didn't call anyone out with that remark.

Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Apr. 9, 2013 at 7:30 AM


Quoting fireangel5:


Why? The doctor filled out the immunization record, indicating chicken pox disease during a particular month/year. I have never had to submit a titer for any immunization during all of my kids school years. 

Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:

I would think that the school would require a titer as proof

Quoting fireangel5:


When my kids were young, I didn't want my boys to have the chicken pox vax and my Dr didn't disagree. I simply told her that they had the pox before they actually did. There was no issue. I don't think it was mandatory at that time tho. 



You told your doctor that your childre already had the chicken pox and s/he noted that within the medical record without actually running a titer? Or did your doctor know that your children had not had chicken pox and still stated your child had them? Am I understanding this correctly?

Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Apr. 9, 2013 at 7:41 AM


Quoting TranquilMind:

 This is so funny to me.

Not only did my entire generation go to school without any proof of vaccination for anything, but titers  don't even register immunity UNLESS THE PERSON IS FIGHTING THE ILLNESS.  So taking a titer on a person who  isn't battling the illness at the moment won't show anything at all.  The person can be totally immune and show nothing, because the disease has to activate the cells that fight it. 

Read it for yourself.

I had a titer done and it did show that I was totally immune to chicken pox, even though I had never had chicken pox.  I only know because when my kids got it, I was in my 40's, and they thought it was a good idea to check me, since I was older.  Well sure....my immunity showed up, because my kids had been coming down with the illness for the 10 day incubation period, and were already ill, firing up my immune system.  So I measured properly to show immunity. 

So glad my kids have lifelong real immunity to that one, just like I do.  Oh, and my Mom was also immune, even though she had never had the chicken pox either.  Back then, you got exposed to everybody so if your body built immunities without even being sick, you were good. 



Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:

I would think that the school *doctor* would require a titer as proof

Quoting fireangel5:


When my kids were young, I didn't want my boys to have the chicken pox vax and my Dr didn't disagree. I simply told her that they had the pox before they actually did. There was no issue. I don't think it was mandatory at that time tho. 



I understand what your stating. I also think that I haven't made myself clear. I actually meant *doctor* not school.

Public schools require documentation about childhood illness from doctors.  In my particular ped.practice, and many others my friends use the physicians have to actually diagnose or run a titer for 'proof'.

I realize that titers aren't 100% accurate. I also don't know of any doctors that would take the word of the parent without any medical documentation regarding an illness like chickenpox. I guess if this particular ped. is comfortable making declarations of his/her patients without documentation that's on him/her.

SuDoNim
by Member on Apr. 9, 2013 at 7:57 AM
1 mom liked this

That's not true in NY. To claim a religious exemption, you have to draft a notarized letter, explaining your personal religious beliefs and how vaccines conflict with those beliefs. If you are choosing some vaccines, your exemption will be denied.

I am pro-vaccination, but even I think the state is being unreasonable with this particular situation. I understand that the medical exemption does not meet the state's criteria, but they could have granted a temporary medical exemption, under the circumstances.

Quoting katy_kay08:

she would have been smarter to claim a religious exemption as no documentation is necessary. 



Kmary
by Member on Apr. 9, 2013 at 8:04 AM

Wow this story is pretty infuriating and I'm a mom whose kids are fully vaxed on schedule!  Not only is there much more to the story than simply a parent who doesn't believe in vaccines (not that the reason matters really...) but it's the Chicken Pox one, of all shots?  An illness that, except in the rarest of circumstances, is not at all dangerous in kids?  In fact, aside from very tiny infants, the younger the patient the easier the case of Chicken Pox is on them.  It is one of the very few vaccines that I'd  prefer my kids not get in the future due to my feeling that it's simply unecessary.  Grrr.  What a bunch of BS!

IhartU
by Gold Member on Apr. 9, 2013 at 8:33 AM

 You know what- if it's the LAW that you have to have your child vaccinated, then stop bitching when you're kids can't attend. Unless there is a medical reason you can't vaccinate then you should. You should not be allowed to use paranoia as an exemption or be able to LIE about it being against your religion to get around it.

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