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New York ordered to pay up over NYPD's destruction of Occupy property

Posted by on Apr. 10, 2013 at 3:32 AM
  • 87 Replies
2 moms liked this

A bible and other recovered books from the Occupy Wall Street library damaged in the November 15 eviction of Zuccotti Park on display at a press conference November 23, 2011 at a lawyers office in New York. (AFP Photo / Stan Honda)
A bible and other recovered books from the Occupy Wall Street library damaged in the November 15 eviction of Zuccotti Park on display at a press conference November 23, 2011 at a lawyers office in New York. (AFP Photo / Stan Honda)

The City of New York will pay over $365,000 to settle a lawsuit filed by people whose property was damaged and destroyed when the NYPD raided Zuccotti Park, dispersing Occupy Wall Street protesters, on November 15, 2011.

The City of New York will pay over $365,000 to settle a lawsuit filed by people whose property was damaged and destroyed when the NYPD raided Zuccotti Park, dispersing Occupy Wall Street protesters, on November 15, 2011.

The crux of the lawsuit was the destruction of the People’s Library, in which NYPD officers damaged and disposed of 5,500 publicly donated books gathered over a two-month period. In the days following the midnight raid, New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg initially claimed the library was still intact but was eventually forced to admit that he presided over its destruction.

Occupy activists have since rallied around the dismantling of the library, citing it as evidence of the government’s commitment to suppressing criticism and a free exchange of ideas while comparing Bloomberg to book-burning Nazi-era Germany and other totalitarian states.

The plaintiffs sought $47,000 in damages and promised not to settle unless they received that amount, which they eventually did. The city will also pay $186,350 in fees and costs to Occupy Wall Street’s lawyers.

Our clients are pleased,” Norman Siegel, the attorney for Occupy Wall Street, told the Village Voice. “We had asked for damages of $47,000 for the books and the computers, and we got $47,000. More important – we would have not settled without this – is the language in the settlement. This was not just about money, it was about Constitutional rights and the destruction of books.”

The city will also pay $75,000 for destroying property owned by Global Revolutions TV, a media station that livestreamed the activity in the park, another $49,850 in court and lawyer fees, and an $8,500 check will go to Times Up New York.

Not long after the lawsuit was filed attorneys for the city tried to enlist Brookfield Properties, the owner of Zuccotti Park, as a co-defendant. Despite sending in NYPD officers and workers from the department of Sanitation to clean up the park, the city alleged that Brookfield was liable for the destructive results of the raid. Brookfield properties, which hired a carting company for the mass eviction, will pay the city $15,666.67, as per the court settlement.

Siegel outlined the goals of the lawsuit last year.

My sense was the Bloomberg administration was not prepared to say it did anything wrong,” he said. “But we want a declaration, for historical purposes, that the government can’t do what it did on November 15 and get away with it.”

http://rt.com/usa/nyc-settlement-occupy-library-600/

by on Apr. 10, 2013 at 3:32 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on Apr. 10, 2013 at 7:40 AM
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I'm all for the right to protest. The park, public or private, is not out of reach of police. Especially when it comes to safety. If people hadn't been squatting this wouldn't have happened.

candlegal
by Judy on Apr. 10, 2013 at 8:11 AM

oh brother

CorpCityGrl
by Bronze Member on Apr. 10, 2013 at 9:55 AM
2 moms liked this

I agree!

They had the right to protest, however, they were squatting.  It was disgusting down there and filthy and dirty and smelly.  It had become a hotbed of STD's and disease and it was unsafe.  The protestors would also harrass passer-bys and pedestrians.  They were asked to leave more than once under peaceable terms and refused. They were on private property since the park is not owned by the city and the owners wanted them vacated and they had refused.  It became a farce.

Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:

I'm all for the right to protest. The park, public or private, is not out of reach of police. Especially when it comes to safety. If people hadn't been squatting this wouldn't have happened.



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by on Apr. 10, 2013 at 10:52 AM
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Too bad - people shouldn't have been there and if they hadn't then property woudln't have been damaged.  

brookiecookie87
by Platinum Member on Apr. 10, 2013 at 11:21 AM
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Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:

I'm all for the right to protest. The park, public or private, is not out of reach of police. Especially when it comes to safety. If people hadn't been squatting this wouldn't have happened.

What about the people who were not squatting but were just protesting? They were not treated any better?

In many cases reporters, aribiters (Lawyers), and anyone else there were treated the same as well (Being arrested with little regard for what they are doing, or the items/equipment they have on them).

And does Protesting have any meaning at all if you have to do it at a designated spot, at a designated time, and be gone before anyone is bothered? How would a protest like that ever get anyone to change their stance/do something different?

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If they enforced bank regulations like they do park rules, we wouldn't be in this mess

brookiecookie87
by Platinum Member on Apr. 10, 2013 at 11:25 AM
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Quoting CorpCityGrl:

I agree!

They had the right to protest, however, they were squatting.  It was disgusting down there and filthy and dirty and smelly.  It had become a hotbed of STD's and disease and it was unsafe.  The protestors would also harrass passer-bys and pedestrians.  They were asked to leave more than once under peaceable terms and refused. They were on private property since the park is not owned by the city and the owners wanted them vacated and they had refused.  It became a farce.

It was a hotbed of STD's and disease? Did you go to any of the areas? I did. I didn't see any diseases, or std's. Did bums flock to them? Absolutely. Free food, supplies, and clothes? Of course they will show up. 

What about the people who were not squatting but were just protesting? They were not treated any better?

In many cases reporters, aribiters (Lawyers), and anyone else there were treated the same as well (Being arrested with little regard for what they are doing, or the items/equipment they have on them).

And does Protesting have any meaning at all if you have to do it at a designated spot, at a designated time, and be gone before anyone is bothered? How would a protest like that ever get anyone to change their stance/do something different?

Join us on the 99% Moms group!
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If they enforced bank regulations like they do park rules, we wouldn't be in this mess

brookiecookie87
by Platinum Member on Apr. 10, 2013 at 11:28 AM
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Quoting TerriAnne2606:

Too bad - people shouldn't have been there and if they hadn't then property woudln't have been damaged.  

Right. They should complain from home. Because that would make a world of difference.

And last time I checked the consequence for being where you are not suppose to be is not the Police destroying all your equipment.


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If they enforced bank regulations like they do park rules, we wouldn't be in this mess

CorpCityGrl
by Bronze Member on Apr. 10, 2013 at 11:36 AM
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Quoting brookiecookie87:



Quoting CorpCityGrl:

I agree!

They had the right to protest, however, they were squatting.  It was disgusting down there and filthy and dirty and smelly.  It had become a hotbed of STD's and disease and it was unsafe.  The protestors would also harrass passer-bys and pedestrians.  They were asked to leave more than once under peaceable terms and refused. They were on private property since the park is not owned by the city and the owners wanted them vacated and they had refused.  It became a farce.

It was a hotbed of STD's and disease? Did you go to any of the areas? I did. I didn't see any diseases, or std's. Did bums flock to them? Absolutely. Free food, supplies, and clothes? Of course they will show up. 

What about the people who were not squatting but were just protesting? They were not treated any better?

In many cases reporters, aribiters (Lawyers), and anyone else there were treated the same as well (Being arrested with little regard for what they are doing, or the items/equipment they have on them).

And does Protesting have any meaning at all if you have to do it at a designated spot, at a designated time, and be gone before anyone is bothered? How would a protest like that ever get anyone to change their stance/do something different?

Yes it was!  Just because you didn't physically see it didn't mean it didn't exist.  That was part of the problem - free screenings were being offered and they were finding high incidences of STD's among the protesters and with the conditions deteriorating, people were getting sick. 

If you wanted to protest, then go ahead and protest - no one was really going to take that away from them.  We have protesters in NYC all the time protesting different things almost on a daily basis.  Many of the OWS protesters were actually very belligerent and would harrass people just doing their daily commute to their jobs.  DH and several people we know worked down there and on a daily basis were harrassed by OWS protesters.  They would go so far as follow normal people making their way to work yelling at them and belittling them.  Do you know the number of complaints from people the police got just from this behavior?!  I'm sorry, DH is a Federal employee and every single day he had swarms of protesters yelling at him and following him and belittling him BECAUSE he wears a suit to work and has a job! You can protest, but there were lines being crossed there. 

The bigger problem of it was that they were actually on private property and once the capacity got too big, the owners of Zuccotti Park wanted them vacated because it was a hazard.  Zuccotti Park is not big...heck NYC does not have big spaces to sustain large groups like that for extended periods of time.  You can protest all you want - you have that right but my GOD to be as disrepectful as most of those protesters were is appalling.  I get you want to get your message across, but they ended up alienating the people that they needed support from. 


brookiecookie87
by Platinum Member on Apr. 10, 2013 at 11:46 AM



Quoting CorpCityGrl:
Quoting brookiecookie87:

It was a hotbed of STD's and disease? Did you go to any of the areas? I did. I didn't see any diseases, or std's. Did bums flock to them? Absolutely. Free food, supplies, and clothes? Of course they will show up. 

What about the people who were not squatting but were just protesting? They were not treated any better?

In many cases reporters, aribiters (Lawyers), and anyone else there were treated the same as well (Being arrested with little regard for what they are doing, or the items/equipment they have on them).

And does Protesting have any meaning at all if you have to do it at a designated spot, at a designated time, and be gone before anyone is bothered? How would a protest like that ever get anyone to change their stance/do something different?

Yes it was!  Just because you didn't physically see it didn't mean it didn't exist.  That was part of the problem - free screenings were being offered and they were finding high incidences of STD's among the protesters and with the conditions deteriorating, people were getting sick. 

If you wanted to protest, then go ahead and protest - no one was really going to take that away from them.  We have protesters in NYC all the time protesting different things almost on a daily basis.  Many of the OWS protesters were actually very belligerent and would harrass people just doing their daily commute to their jobs.  DH and several people we know worked down there and on a daily basis were harrassed by OWS protesters.  They would go so far as follow normal people making their way to work yelling at them and belittling them.  Do you know the number of complaints from people the police got just from this behavior?!  I'm sorry, DH is a Federal employee and every single day he had swarms of protesters yelling at him and following him and belittling him BECAUSE he wears a suit to work and has a job! You can protest, but there were lines being crossed there. 

The bigger problem of it was that they were actually on private property and once the capacity got too big, the owners of Zuccotti Park wanted them vacated because it was a hazard.  Zuccotti Park is not big...heck NYC does not have big spaces to sustain large groups like that for extended periods of time.  You can protest all you want - you have that right but my GOD to be as disrepectful as most of those protesters were is appalling.  I get you want to get your message across, but they ended up alienating the people that they needed support from. 

Can you site a source for any of that? Because if you got it from mainstream media sites they could have just been making things up. There were completely for trying to discredit the group by any means. They even were willing to show footage of violent protest in place of peaceful protest to make them look more violent. They often interviewed the most crazy people in the crowds and aired that.

If you saw them from mainstream news and then watched a live feed (And nearly every major occupy group had one) you would see a world of difference. You would go from people in costume saying the most random things (On mainstream news) and then when you watched a live feed suddenly nearly everyone is a college student, college grad, person who was laid offed, and the occasional bum, crazy person.

It was the difference between night and day.

And what was the STD rate compared to the STD rate to the city?

And you realized they could have been arrested peacefully and slowly, right? There were other occupy groups that were arrested peacefully. Where the Police Officers walked up to each person one at a time and asked them if they wanted to leave or be arressted. And after the person says they are staying the police would take them and arrest them and go down the line doing this.

Everyone gets arrested (That refuses to leave) and the equipment supplies are left in tact. They didn't have to do a raid at night, and destroy as much as they could.



Join us on the 99% Moms group!
The Ninety-Nine Percent Moms   

If they enforced bank regulations like they do park rules, we wouldn't be in this mess

CorpCityGrl
by Bronze Member on Apr. 10, 2013 at 12:22 PM
2 moms liked this



Quoting brookiecookie87:



Quoting CorpCityGrl:
Quoting brookiecookie87:

It was a hotbed of STD's and disease? Did you go to any of the areas? I did. I didn't see any diseases, or std's. Did bums flock to them? Absolutely. Free food, supplies, and clothes? Of course they will show up. 

What about the people who were not squatting but were just protesting? They were not treated any better?

In many cases reporters, aribiters (Lawyers), and anyone else there were treated the same as well (Being arrested with little regard for what they are doing, or the items/equipment they have on them).

And does Protesting have any meaning at all if you have to do it at a designated spot, at a designated time, and be gone before anyone is bothered? How would a protest like that ever get anyone to change their stance/do something different?

Yes it was!  Just because you didn't physically see it didn't mean it didn't exist.  That was part of the problem - free screenings were being offered and they were finding high incidences of STD's among the protesters and with the conditions deteriorating, people were getting sick. 

If you wanted to protest, then go ahead and protest - no one was really going to take that away from them.  We have protesters in NYC all the time protesting different things almost on a daily basis.  Many of the OWS protesters were actually very belligerent and would harrass people just doing their daily commute to their jobs.  DH and several people we know worked down there and on a daily basis were harrassed by OWS protesters.  They would go so far as follow normal people making their way to work yelling at them and belittling them.  Do you know the number of complaints from people the police got just from this behavior?!  I'm sorry, DH is a Federal employee and every single day he had swarms of protesters yelling at him and following him and belittling him BECAUSE he wears a suit to work and has a job! You can protest, but there were lines being crossed there. 

The bigger problem of it was that they were actually on private property and once the capacity got too big, the owners of Zuccotti Park wanted them vacated because it was a hazard.  Zuccotti Park is not big...heck NYC does not have big spaces to sustain large groups like that for extended periods of time.  You can protest all you want - you have that right but my GOD to be as disrepectful as most of those protesters were is appalling.  I get you want to get your message across, but they ended up alienating the people that they needed support from. 

Can you site a source for any of that? Because if you got it from mainstream media sites they could have just been making things up. There were completely for trying to discredit the group by any means. They even were willing to show footage of violent protest in place of peaceful protest to make them look more violent. They often interviewed the most crazy people in the crowds and aired that.

If you saw them from mainstream news and then watched a live feed (And nearly every major occupy group had one) you would see a world of difference. You would go from people in costume saying the most random things (On mainstream news) and then when you watched a live feed suddenly nearly everyone is a college student, college grad, person who was laid offed, and the occasional bum, crazy person.

It was the difference between night and day.

And what was the STD rate compared to the STD rate to the city?

And you realized they could have been arrested peacefully and slowly, right? There were other occupy groups that were arrested peacefully. Where the Police Officers walked up to each person one at a time and asked them if they wanted to leave or be arressted. And after the person says they are staying the police would take them and arrest them and go down the line doing this.

Everyone gets arrested (That refuses to leave) and the equipment supplies are left in tact. They didn't have to do a raid at night, and destroy as much as they could.




I don't need to site any media source.  I LIVE in NYC.  I have friends who worked down there...who volunteered down there!  My own aunt, who is not only a doctor but a Carmelite nun was down there with free clinics to provide antibiotics.   

They were given plenty of opportunity to leave peaceable but they chose not to.  They were given deadlines that were pushed back several times to leave in a quiet manner and were warned more than once.  Heck, they even tried to find another place for them to protest!

Do you also know that they attacked the police officers here?  After taunting them incessently and demeaning their jobs, they would oftentimes attack police officers.  Let me tell you, the NYPD is probably one of the most hated law enforcement groups in the country because people judge them based on the bad cops that we see on tv.  However, they are under-paid and over-worked and would go down there to help police not as part of their regular shift but as over-time - time taken away from their families and friends and rest - and the protesters would treat them like crap and talk down to them.  Let me tell you - many of those protesters were youths with college degrees and many never held a job in their life and didn't just want a job, they wanted an executive job and not have to work their way up.  Do I think that executives are being paid too much - hell yeah!  However, the protester's message was completely lost because they were unorganized and they themselves didn't even know what they were truly protesting about.

I'm all for social change, but they were attacking the wrong people.

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