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Can someone help me understand autism?

Posted by on Apr. 17, 2013 at 12:00 PM
  • 77 Replies
1 mom liked this

 I am the first to admit, I don't understand autism. What made you seek a diagnosis for yourself or your child/ren? I know I can look up a million sources and articles on the internet, I would rather ask real women who have it or have children who have it. Please can someone educate me (and maybe others)?

ETA- I really want to thank you all for sharing your stories, struggles and triumphs.

by on Apr. 17, 2013 at 12:00 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Sekirei
by Nari Trickster on Apr. 17, 2013 at 12:22 PM
For my son, I was simply concerned that he wasn't talking. He was 3 and still pointed and screamed or made little noises to get something. My mil also noticed this. Even though we both worked with him.
He had his hearing checked and the pediatrician sent us to a neurologist just in case. Autism wasn't mentioned until the neurologist met with him. The hearing test revealed he could barely hear us, which was caused by water behind his ear drums. He had tubes put in soon after that.
The neurologist didn't see him until after the surgery.
He recommended that Kael be tested and it took about a year and three docs before it was finished.
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tscritch
by Silver Member on Apr. 17, 2013 at 12:29 PM

 Thank you! So even after the tubes they did further testing for autism? Why, at that point did they feel they needed to do further testing?

Quoting Sekirei:

For my son, I was simply concerned that he wasn't talking. He was 3 and still pointed and screamed or made little noises to get something. My mil also noticed this. Even though we both worked with him.
He had his hearing checked and the pediatrician sent us to a neurologist just in case. Autism wasn't mentioned until the neurologist met with him. The hearing test revealed he could barely hear us, which was caused by water behind his ear drums. He had tubes put in soon after that.
The neurologist didn't see him until after the surgery.
He recommended that Kael be tested and it took about a year and three docs before it was finished.

 

Sekirei
by Nari Trickster on Apr. 17, 2013 at 12:33 PM
He still had some other odd behaviors. The flapping, he didn't speak in full sentences until kindergarten ( meaning, full sentences of his own bye can memorize lines from movies and would just spout those off) he has social issues and really has no empathy. He will phase out or get very upset if a place is too crowded. Lines up his toys and gets upset if someone moves them.
He is a good boy though. Lol


Quoting tscritch:

 Thank you! So even after the tubes they did further testing for autism? Why, at that point did they feel they needed to do further testing?


Quoting Sekirei:

For my son, I was simply concerned that he wasn't talking. He was 3 and still pointed and screamed or made little noises to get something. My mil also noticed this. Even though we both worked with him.
He had his hearing checked and the pediatrician sent us to a neurologist just in case. Autism wasn't mentioned until the neurologist met with him. The hearing test revealed he could barely hear us, which was caused by water behind his ear drums. He had tubes put in soon after that.
The neurologist didn't see him until after the surgery.
He recommended that Kael be tested and it took about a year and three docs before it was finished.

 

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Sekirei
by Nari Trickster on Apr. 17, 2013 at 12:34 PM
Sorry if my spelling or grammar is off. On my cell phone.
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tscritch
by Silver Member on Apr. 17, 2013 at 12:36 PM

 So what now, since being diagnosed has that done for him? Where on the spectrum does he fall?

I hope you don't mind all the questions, I am really trying to get a better understanding. :-)

Quoting Sekirei:

He still had some other odd behaviors. The flapping, he didn't speak in full sentences until kindergarten ( meaning, full sentences of his own bye can memorize lines from movies and would just spout those off) he has social issues and really has no empathy. He will phase out or get very upset if a place is too crowded. Lines up his toys and gets upset if someone moves them.
He is a good boy though. Lol


Quoting tscritch:

 Thank you! So even after the tubes they did further testing for autism? Why, at that point did they feel they needed to do further testing?


Quoting Sekirei:

For my son, I was simply concerned that he wasn't talking. He was 3 and still pointed and screamed or made little noises to get something. My mil also noticed this. Even though we both worked with him.
He had his hearing checked and the pediatrician sent us to a neurologist just in case. Autism wasn't mentioned until the neurologist met with him. The hearing test revealed he could barely hear us, which was caused by water behind his ear drums. He had tubes put in soon after that.
The neurologist didn't see him until after the surgery.
He recommended that Kael be tested and it took about a year and three docs before it was finished.

 

 

tscritch
by Silver Member on Apr. 17, 2013 at 12:37 PM

 ok, but only this one time! lol

Quoting Sekirei:

Sorry if my spelling or grammar is off. On my cell phone.

 

desertlvn
by Silver Member on Apr. 17, 2013 at 12:41 PM
1 mom liked this

The best place , i think, is autism.org. They have videos of children displaying specific symptoms

specialwingz
by on Apr. 17, 2013 at 12:44 PM

My twin boys are ADHD/Asperger's Syndrome.  Asperger's Syndrome is on the high functioning end of the autism spectrum.  For them, it was the inability to focus on ANYTHING!  They are incredibly intelligent with a bit above average IQs.  But, in school, they could never finish things.  They couldn't focus on the teacher.  They would find their "happy place" by getting up in the middle of class, grab a book off a shelf and sit down and read.  It was how they escaped the "information overload".

Autistic brains work completely different than yours or mine.  I learned a lot about it, actually, when I researched traumatic brain injury due to an accident my ex-h had.  TBI and autism are very similar.

We tried the "diet" approach.  It totally did nothing.  We finally tried them with different meds.  Ritalin was the one that made the teachers shriek with amazement!  They boys owuld finally look them in the eye and repeat what the lesson was about!  Their grades improved and their social skills also improved.  They still read a lot.  But, it was used as a reward for paying attention in class.  As the years went by, they had to change the type of meds they were on.  Kids outgrow the dosage.  Or the medication didn't last through the day to still be effective for homework and boyscouts.  Tweaking times were hard.  But, we all got through it.

Now that they are in college, they are on Vyvanse.  Which was primarily (at first) designed for adults since an adult's day goes way beyond an 8 hour stint of anything.  LOL.  Now they have it for children as well.

College brought out a lot of their social inabilities again.  And, they are struggling again with organization.  But, we are working with them to help them try to find a new "sweet spot" that works for their brains.

There really isn't a short version to explaining autism.  And, really, all the words in the world don't cover what an autistic child and their caregivers go through on a daily basis.

survivorinohio
by René on Apr. 17, 2013 at 12:46 PM

That site is down


The Global Autism Collaboration (GAC) is currently being restructured
and will merge with the Global Autism Alliance (GAA).

The new structure will be completed by January, 2013.

Please visit us next month to learn about the new and exciting changes.

Quoting desertlvn:

The best place , i think, is autism.org. They have videos of children displaying specific symptoms


How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


desertlvn
by Silver Member on Apr. 17, 2013 at 12:48 PM


Permanently? I hope not.


Quoting survivorinohio:

That site is down


The Global Autism Collaboration (GAC) is currently being restructured
and will merge with the Global Autism Alliance (GAA).

The new structure will be completed by January, 2013.

Please visit us next month to learn about the new and exciting changes.

Quoting desertlvn:

The best place , i think, is autism.org. They have videos of children displaying specific symptoms




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