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Teachers are to teach not to raise your children

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It seems to me that parents are expecting teachers to actually raise their child/children. They complain when problems in their house happens with their children that have nothing to do with school but they still think that the teachers should get involved.  Here is an idea, don't let your preteens text or get on facebook that is where a lot of the drama starts.  We cannot discipline a child for something that happens at night at the house, I have my own house to deal with at the end of the day I sure do not need a bunch of drama queens to deal with.  Sorry rough day at school.

by on Apr. 22, 2013 at 3:44 PM
Replies (211-220):
LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Apr. 25, 2013 at 7:51 PM

What I know about the FB drama is that it has no natural boundaries, including which building the phone is in.

I get that there's only so much time in a day: it's the same reason kids are in school at all --parents are busy doing all those frivolous things, like earning money to pay for trivialities like food and daycare and the taxes that pay the teachers.

They CANNOT do the 'taking care of children' while they're at work and the child is at school. They can't do it while they're all sleeping. They can't do it while they're commuting to the afterschool care, or from it on the way to work. They can only 'do their job' when they're present.

The problem, as I see it, is that the entire system is set up to maximize the number of people in one room with the minimum possible adults: the system is set up so that it is NOT POSSIBLE to meet the needs of all the kids AND educate all the kids, so a whole lot of kids get neither, a whole lot of the time.

Tough shit, eh?

Quoting purplerobin:


Usually if there's an issue with fb it's because a kid says something to A PARENT (they're usually closer to parents than teachers, parental bonding and all). So it's as likely that a kid is gonna go up to a teacher and say, "so-and-so said such and such to me on fb, OMG!" as they will their parents. Sure a teacher can mention guidelines, how to treat people, and what's appropriate or not, and to a point they should. To a POINT. After that, a parent needs to be a parent.


Parents can't 'do their job' when they are NOT PRESENT? Do you honestly think that fb drama HAS to be dealt with AT SCHOOL right then and there? No it doesn't. Parents are going to have more impact than a teacher usually, and the world isn't gonna fall apart for a kid to wait to discuss in detail with a parent.

if the teacher dropped everything every time a kid brought up any personal issue they were having, no learning would ever take place (academically). There is ONLY. SO. MUCH. TIME. IN. ONE. DAY.!!! The concept is simple, really!

Quoting LindaClement:

One of the classic poems I can never forget is called "I need you when I need you." It doesn't matter what other vital or important things adults believe must happen as priorities: when kids need something, they need it. They can no more time their needs for only when their parents are present than they can levitate.

Parents can't 'do their job' when they are NOT PRESENT. Teachers must do what children need when they are the only adults available. 

You cannot tell a 9yo 'hold that thought until your parents are available' ... or, well, you can but it will have absolutely no effect. The fact that the law allows teachers (and no other kind of childcare provider) to be so ridiculously outnumbered by the children in their care does nothing, at all, to alter the needs of children.

What else a teacher (or school system, or entire society) thinks is important to do during a day ALSO has no impact on what children need in the present moment.

Quoting purplerobin:


I'm not talking about teachers obligation o teach students to be humane.  I'm saying if an issue happens that involves personal stuff, it's the parents responsibility to deal with it. There's only so much a teacher has time to address in one day. Parents need to do their jobs too.

Quoting LindaClement:

If they don't 'educate' them to be humane, civilized people, all the knowledge and skills in the world won't help the future.

As this quote explains:

"Dear Teacher:

I am a survivor of a concentration camp.  My eyes saw what no man should witness: Gas chambers built by learned engineers. Children poisoned by educated physicians. Infants killed by trained nurses. Women and babies shot and burned by high school and college graduates. So I am suspicious of education.

My request is: Help your students become human.  Your efforts must never produce learned monsters, skilled psychopaths, educated Eichmanns.  Reading, writing and arithmetic are important only if they serve to make our children more humane." 

Quoting purplerobin:

Quoting LindaClement:

When they have young, immature humans for a large proportion of the time they're awake, teachers GET to discipline (that is: guide) children to civilized, ethical behaviour.

If not them, who is supposed to be doing it when there are no other adults around? Other children? The air?

They're supposed to be educating the children. There's barely enough time for THAT!! And NO fb drama is not so urgent that it MUST be dealt with by a teacher.









purplerobin
by on Apr. 26, 2013 at 1:36 AM


Yes, Linda it IS tough shit. Is no wonder teachers are lucky to have time to address ANY subject outside of academics....thank God most FB drama will hold tight until a parent can deal with it, eh? ;)

Quoting LindaClement:

What I know about the FB drama is that it has no natural boundaries, including which building the phone is in.

I get that there's only so much time in a day: it's the same reason kids are in school at all --parents are busy doing all those frivolous things, like earning money to pay for trivialities like food and daycare and the taxes that pay the teachers.

They CANNOT do the 'taking care of children' while they're at work and the child is at school. They can't do it while they're all sleeping. They can't do it while they're commuting to the afterschool care, or from it on the way to work. They can only 'do their job' when they're present.

The problem, as I see it, is that the entire system is set up to maximize the number of people in one room with the minimum possible adults: the system is set up so that it is NOT POSSIBLE to meet the needs of all the kids AND educate all the kids, so a whole lot of kids get neither, a whole lot of the time.

Tough shit, eh?

Quoting purplerobin:


Usually if there's an issue with fb it's because a kid says something to A PARENT (they're usually closer to parents than teachers, parental bonding and all). So it's as likely that a kid is gonna go up to a teacher and say, "so-and-so said such and such to me on fb, OMG!" as they will their parents. Sure a teacher can mention guidelines, how to treat people, and what's appropriate or not, and to a point they should. To a POINT. After that, a parent needs to be a parent.


Parents can't 'do their job' when they are NOT PRESENT? Do you honestly think that fb drama HAS to be dealt with AT SCHOOL right then and there? No it doesn't. Parents are going to have more impact than a teacher usually, and the world isn't gonna fall apart for a kid to wait to discuss in detail with a parent.

if the teacher dropped everything every time a kid brought up any personal issue they were having, no learning would ever take place (academically). There is ONLY. SO. MUCH. TIME. IN. ONE. DAY.!!! The concept is simple, really!

Quoting LindaClement:

One of the classic poems I can never forget is called "I need you when I need you." It doesn't matter what other vital or important things adults believe must happen as priorities: when kids need something, they need it. They can no more time their needs for only when their parents are present than they can levitate.

Parents can't 'do their job' when they are NOT PRESENT. Teachers must do what children need when they are the only adults available. 

You cannot tell a 9yo 'hold that thought until your parents are available' ... or, well, you can but it will have absolutely no effect. The fact that the law allows teachers (and no other kind of childcare provider) to be so ridiculously outnumbered by the children in their care does nothing, at all, to alter the needs of children.

What else a teacher (or school system, or entire society) thinks is important to do during a day ALSO has no impact on what children need in the present moment.

Quoting purplerobin:


I'm not talking about teachers obligation o teach students to be humane.  I'm saying if an issue happens that involves personal stuff, it's the parents responsibility to deal with it. There's only so much a teacher has time to address in one day. Parents need to do their jobs too.

Quoting LindaClement:

If they don't 'educate' them to be humane, civilized people, all the knowledge and skills in the world won't help the future.

As this quote explains:

"Dear Teacher:

I am a survivor of a concentration camp.  My eyes saw what no man should witness: Gas chambers built by learned engineers. Children poisoned by educated physicians. Infants killed by trained nurses. Women and babies shot and burned by high school and college graduates. So I am suspicious of education.

My request is: Help your students become human.  Your efforts must never produce learned monsters, skilled psychopaths, educated Eichmanns.  Reading, writing and arithmetic are important only if they serve to make our children more humane." 

Quoting purplerobin:

Quoting LindaClement:

When they have young, immature humans for a large proportion of the time they're awake, teachers GET to discipline (that is: guide) children to civilized, ethical behaviour.

If not them, who is supposed to be doing it when there are no other adults around? Other children? The air?

They're supposed to be educating the children. There's barely enough time for THAT!! And NO fb drama is not so urgent that it MUST be dealt with by a teacher.











monica4_85
by on Apr. 26, 2013 at 9:19 AM

 How is it outrageous? Many kids come to realize that they won't get play time if they dont do their homework. I've seen my sister do this with my nephews teacher. He's in the 3rd grade now and she has no problems with getting him to do his homework. Playtime or recess is a priviledge to these kids. If your grounded at home it's kind of cheating to be able to play w/ your friends at school during recess. It also shows your child that you and his teacher are working together. Depends on the situation. But IMO no homework should equal no recess.


Quoting desertlvn:

 

That's outrageous. 

Quoting kaylasmom22:

Well dd is in kindergarten and if she won't behave at home ( mostly doesn't want to do hw or read) I do tell the teacher. The teacher doesn't mind talking to her and I have seen teachers take away play time at the parents request for bad behavior at home.(mostly pre-k students)

 

 


 

LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Apr. 26, 2013 at 11:10 AM

Supposing they ever will... yeah.

It's too bad we live in a culture that genuinely does not care about children, really.

Quoting purplerobin:


Yes, Linda it IS tough shit. Is no wonder teachers are lucky to have time to address ANY subject outside of academics....thank God most FB drama will hold tight until a parent can deal with it, eh? ;)

Quoting LindaClement:

What I know about the FB drama is that it has no natural boundaries, including which building the phone is in.

I get that there's only so much time in a day: it's the same reason kids are in school at all --parents are busy doing all those frivolous things, like earning money to pay for trivialities like food and daycare and the taxes that pay the teachers.

They CANNOT do the 'taking care of children' while they're at work and the child is at school. They can't do it while they're all sleeping. They can't do it while they're commuting to the afterschool care, or from it on the way to work. They can only 'do their job' when they're present.

The problem, as I see it, is that the entire system is set up to maximize the number of people in one room with the minimum possible adults: the system is set up so that it is NOT POSSIBLE to meet the needs of all the kids AND educate all the kids, so a whole lot of kids get neither, a whole lot of the time.

Tough shit, eh?

Quoting purplerobin:


Usually if there's an issue with fb it's because a kid says something to A PARENT (they're usually closer to parents than teachers, parental bonding and all). So it's as likely that a kid is gonna go up to a teacher and say, "so-and-so said such and such to me on fb, OMG!" as they will their parents. Sure a teacher can mention guidelines, how to treat people, and what's appropriate or not, and to a point they should. To a POINT. After that, a parent needs to be a parent.


Parents can't 'do their job' when they are NOT PRESENT? Do you honestly think that fb drama HAS to be dealt with AT SCHOOL right then and there? No it doesn't. Parents are going to have more impact than a teacher usually, and the world isn't gonna fall apart for a kid to wait to discuss in detail with a parent.

if the teacher dropped everything every time a kid brought up any personal issue they were having, no learning would ever take place (academically). There is ONLY. SO. MUCH. TIME. IN. ONE. DAY.!!! The concept is simple, really!

Quoting LindaClement:

One of the classic poems I can never forget is called "I need you when I need you." It doesn't matter what other vital or important things adults believe must happen as priorities: when kids need something, they need it. They can no more time their needs for only when their parents are present than they can levitate.

Parents can't 'do their job' when they are NOT PRESENT. Teachers must do what children need when they are the only adults available. 

You cannot tell a 9yo 'hold that thought until your parents are available' ... or, well, you can but it will have absolutely no effect. The fact that the law allows teachers (and no other kind of childcare provider) to be so ridiculously outnumbered by the children in their care does nothing, at all, to alter the needs of children.

What else a teacher (or school system, or entire society) thinks is important to do during a day ALSO has no impact on what children need in the present moment.

Quoting purplerobin:


I'm not talking about teachers obligation o teach students to be humane.  I'm saying if an issue happens that involves personal stuff, it's the parents responsibility to deal with it. There's only so much a teacher has time to address in one day. Parents need to do their jobs too.

Quoting LindaClement:

If they don't 'educate' them to be humane, civilized people, all the knowledge and skills in the world won't help the future.

As this quote explains:

"Dear Teacher:

I am a survivor of a concentration camp.  My eyes saw what no man should witness: Gas chambers built by learned engineers. Children poisoned by educated physicians. Infants killed by trained nurses. Women and babies shot and burned by high school and college graduates. So I am suspicious of education.

My request is: Help your students become human.  Your efforts must never produce learned monsters, skilled psychopaths, educated Eichmanns.  Reading, writing and arithmetic are important only if they serve to make our children more humane." 

Quoting purplerobin:

Quoting LindaClement:

When they have young, immature humans for a large proportion of the time they're awake, teachers GET to discipline (that is: guide) children to civilized, ethical behaviour.

If not them, who is supposed to be doing it when there are no other adults around? Other children? The air?

They're supposed to be educating the children. There's barely enough time for THAT!! And NO fb drama is not so urgent that it MUST be dealt with by a teacher.












purplerobin
by on Apr. 26, 2013 at 11:13 AM


That's the leap of the century. If our culture cares so little about children, (or not at ALL, according to you) then explain why our country has become more child-centered in recent decades?

Quoting LindaClement:

Supposing they ever will... yeah.

It's too bad we live in a culture that genuinely does not care about children, really.

Quoting purplerobin:


Yes, Linda it IS tough shit. Is no wonder teachers are lucky to have time to address ANY subject outside of academics....thank God most FB drama will hold tight until a parent can deal with it, eh? ;)

Quoting LindaClement:

What I know about the FB drama is that it has no natural boundaries, including which building the phone is in.

I get that there's only so much time in a day: it's the same reason kids are in school at all --parents are busy doing all those frivolous things, like earning money to pay for trivialities like food and daycare and the taxes that pay the teachers.

They CANNOT do the 'taking care of children' while they're at work and the child is at school. They can't do it while they're all sleeping. They can't do it while they're commuting to the afterschool care, or from it on the way to work. They can only 'do their job' when they're present.

The problem, as I see it, is that the entire system is set up to maximize the number of people in one room with the minimum possible adults: the system is set up so that it is NOT POSSIBLE to meet the needs of all the kids AND educate all the kids, so a whole lot of kids get neither, a whole lot of the time.

Tough shit, eh?

Quoting purplerobin:


Usually if there's an issue with fb it's because a kid says something to A PARENT (they're usually closer to parents than teachers, parental bonding and all). So it's as likely that a kid is gonna go up to a teacher and say, "so-and-so said such and such to me on fb, OMG!" as they will their parents. Sure a teacher can mention guidelines, how to treat people, and what's appropriate or not, and to a point they should. To a POINT. After that, a parent needs to be a parent.


Parents can't 'do their job' when they are NOT PRESENT? Do you honestly think that fb drama HAS to be dealt with AT SCHOOL right then and there? No it doesn't. Parents are going to have more impact than a teacher usually, and the world isn't gonna fall apart for a kid to wait to discuss in detail with a parent.

if the teacher dropped everything every time a kid brought up any personal issue they were having, no learning would ever take place (academically). There is ONLY. SO. MUCH. TIME. IN. ONE. DAY.!!! The concept is simple, really!

Quoting LindaClement:

One of the classic poems I can never forget is called "I need you when I need you." It doesn't matter what other vital or important things adults believe must happen as priorities: when kids need something, they need it. They can no more time their needs for only when their parents are present than they can levitate.

Parents can't 'do their job' when they are NOT PRESENT. Teachers must do what children need when they are the only adults available. 

You cannot tell a 9yo 'hold that thought until your parents are available' ... or, well, you can but it will have absolutely no effect. The fact that the law allows teachers (and no other kind of childcare provider) to be so ridiculously outnumbered by the children in their care does nothing, at all, to alter the needs of children.

What else a teacher (or school system, or entire society) thinks is important to do during a day ALSO has no impact on what children need in the present moment.

Quoting purplerobin:


I'm not talking about teachers obligation o teach students to be humane.  I'm saying if an issue happens that involves personal stuff, it's the parents responsibility to deal with it. There's only so much a teacher has time to address in one day. Parents need to do their jobs too.

Quoting LindaClement:

If they don't 'educate' them to be humane, civilized people, all the knowledge and skills in the world won't help the future.

As this quote explains:

"Dear Teacher:

I am a survivor of a concentration camp.  My eyes saw what no man should witness: Gas chambers built by learned engineers. Children poisoned by educated physicians. Infants killed by trained nurses. Women and babies shot and burned by high school and college graduates. So I am suspicious of education.

My request is: Help your students become human.  Your efforts must never produce learned monsters, skilled psychopaths, educated Eichmanns.  Reading, writing and arithmetic are important only if they serve to make our children more humane." 

Quoting purplerobin:

Quoting LindaClement:

When they have young, immature humans for a large proportion of the time they're awake, teachers GET to discipline (that is: guide) children to civilized, ethical behaviour.

If not them, who is supposed to be doing it when there are no other adults around? Other children? The air?

They're supposed to be educating the children. There's barely enough time for THAT!! And NO fb drama is not so urgent that it MUST be dealt with by a teacher.














skyrose213
by New Member on May. 1, 2013 at 8:16 PM

 Its not just learning disabilities becaue kids with type one diabetes gets an iep. Its for kids that need a little extra help and that learn differntly and ADHD kids learn different. Trust me ive done my homeowrk on this my ds is 14 the problem is they tell me my son is passing ds are not pasing in my book and that he tests good well yes he tests good one on one but try that same test in a class room full of kids I bet he doesnt pass. There just pushing him aside I bet once my lawyer contacts the school he get one. My sons nuroligist sent a script to have him have an iep they did nothing

 

Quoting desertlvn:

 

Students with ADHD don't get IEPs. IEPs are for learning disabilities. Students with ADHD get 504 plans. You need to get a doctors note, bring it to the administration, and tell them you want a 504 plan. Special Ed usually doesn't have anything to do with 504 students.

Quoting skyrose213:

I wish the teachers would get educated on adhd. I've been fighting for years he is 14 for an iep and four different schools tell me no he's to smart. Ds and Fs are not passing. I don't know what else to do and no one wants to help teachers included they just want to write him up for being off task or not sitting still. Its sad there's parents that don't do their job and the kids suffer but there is also parents that try there hardest to do the best for there child but can't bec ause the sxhools won't let them.

 

 

 

skyrose213
by New Member on May. 1, 2013 at 8:19 PM

 Who aid every teacher loves their job? Roll your eyes somewhere else and read before you speak

 

Quoting kaylasmom22:

You can't say that,every teacher loves their job.*eye roll*

Quoting skyrose213:

I wish the teachers would get educated on adhd. I've been fighting for years he is 14 for an iep and four different schools tell me no he's to smart. Ds and Fs are not passing. I don't know what else to do and no one wants to help teachers included they just want to write him up for being off task or not sitting still. Its sad there's parents that don't do their job and the kids suffer but there is also parents that try there hardest to do the best for there child but can't bec ause the sxhools won't let them.

 

kaylasmom22
by on May. 2, 2013 at 2:00 PM
It was sarcasm jeez

Quoting skyrose213:

 Who aid every teacher loves their job? Roll your eyes somewhere else and read before you speak


 


Quoting kaylasmom22:

You can't say that,every teacher loves their job.*eye roll*


Quoting skyrose213:

I wish the teachers would get educated on adhd. I've been fighting for years he is 14 for an iep and four different schools tell me no he's to smart. Ds and Fs are not passing. I don't know what else to do and no one wants to help teachers included they just want to write him up for being off task or not sitting still. Its sad there's parents that don't do their job and the kids suffer but there is also parents that try there hardest to do the best for there child but can't bec ause the sxhools won't let them.

 

mysterymom
by on Jun. 28, 2013 at 10:12 AM

I found this on my friend's FB page and she's a teacher:

Teachers' hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work 9 or 10 months a year! It's time we put thing in perspective and pay them for what they do - babysit! We can get that for minimum wage. That's right. Let's give them $3.00 an hour and only the hours they worked; not any of that silly planning time, or any time they spend before or after school. That ...would be $19.50 a day (7:45 to......... 3:00 PM with 45 min. off for lunch and plan-- that equals 6 1/2 hours). Each parent should pay $19.50 a day for these teachers to baby-sit their children. Now how many students do they teach in a day...maybe 30? So that's $19.50 x 30 = $585.00 a day. However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! I am not going to pay them for any vacations. LET'S SEE.... That's $585 X 180= $105,300 per year. (Hold on! My calculator needs new batteries).What about those special education teachers and the ones with Master's degrees? Well, we could pay them minimum wage ($7.75), and just to be fair, round it off to $8.00 an hour. That would be $8 X 6 1/2 hours X 30 children X 180 days = $280,800 per year. Wait a minute -- there's something wrong here! There sure is!

The average teacher's salary (nation wide) is $50,000. $50,000/180 days = $277.77/per day/30 students=$9.25/6.5 hours = $1.42 per hour per student--a very inexpensive baby-sitter and they even EDUCATE your kids!) WHAT A DEAL!!!!

Heaven forbid we take into account highly qualified teachers or NCLB...



supercarp
by Silver Member on Jun. 28, 2013 at 10:15 AM

I agree that parents won't parent then they complain when someone has a problem with their kid.

Teachers can't win.

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