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Autism Vaccine

Posted by on Apr. 25, 2013 at 2:55 PM
  • 3 Replies

Apr. 24, 2013 — A first-ever vaccine created by University of Guelph researchers for gut bacteria common in autistic children may also help control some autism symptoms.

The groundbreaking study by Brittany Pequegnat and Guelph chemistry professor Mario Monteiro appears this month in the journalVaccine.

They developed a carbohydrate-based vaccine against the gut bugClostridium bolteae.

C. bolteae is known to play a role in gastrointestinal disorders, and it often shows up in higher numbers in the GI tracts of autistic children than in those of healthy kids.

More than 90 per cent of children with autism spectrum disorders suffer from chronic, severe gastrointestinal symptoms. Of those, about 75 per cent suffer from diarrhea, according to current literature.

"Little is known about the factors that predispose autistic children to C. bolteae," said Monteiro. Although most infections are handled by some antibiotics, he said, a vaccine would improve current treatment.

"This is the first vaccine designed to control constipation and diarrhea caused by C. bolteae and perhaps control autism-related symptoms associated with this microbe," he said.

Autism cases have increased almost sixfold over the past 20 years, and scientists don't know why. Although many experts point to environmental factors, others have focused on the human gut.

Some researchers believe toxins and/or metabolites produced by gut bacteria, including C. bolteae, may be associated with symptoms and severity of autism, especially regressive autism.

Pequegnat, a master's student, and Monteiro used bacteria grown by Mike Toh, a Guelph PhD student in the lab of microbiology professor Emma Allen-Vercoe.

The new anti- C. bolteae vaccine targets the specific complex polysaccharides, or carbohydrates, on the surface of the bug.

The vaccine effectively raised C. bolteae-specific antibodies in rabbits. Doctors could also use the vaccine-induced antibodies to quickly detect the bug in a clinical setting, said Monteiro.

The vaccine might take more than 10 years to work through preclinical and human trials, and it may take even longer before a drug is ready for market, Monteiro said.

"But this is a significant first step in the design of a multivalent vaccine against several autism-related gut bacteria," he said.

Monteiro has studied sugar-based vaccines for two other gastric pathogens: Campylobacter jejuni, which causes travellers' diarrhea; and Clostridium difficile, which causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea.

The research was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council.


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130424112309.htm

by on Apr. 25, 2013 at 2:55 PM
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cjsbmom
by Lois Lane on Apr. 25, 2013 at 3:05 PM
1 mom liked this

I am part of a very large autism community in my area, and none of us are even considering this. 

I don't believe vaccines caused my son's autism (it's clearly a genetic predisposition on my DH's side of the family), but I do think they may have triggered the autism in his system. It may never have surfaced on its own, or it may have surfaced much later in life. Who knows? But I do know that I have selectively vaxed since then, and this is not something that I would ever consider giving my son. 

Generica
by on Apr. 25, 2013 at 3:10 PM
Quoting cjsbmom:

I am part of a very large autism community in my area, and none of us are even considering this. 

I don't believe vaccines caused my son's autism (it's clearly a genetic predisposition on my DH's side of the family), but I do think they may have triggered the autism in his system. It may never have surfaced on its own, or it may have surfaced much later in life. Who knows? But I do know that I have selectively vaxed since then, and this is not something that I would ever consider giving my son. 

Mine do not have autism but I know a few kids who do have it. My kids got the normal stuff as babies, but we dont do flu or this latest vaccine for HPV.
meriana
by Gold Member on Apr. 25, 2013 at 3:16 PM
1 mom liked this

Great, another vaccine they'll end up insisting every child receive before they go home with mom n dad.

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