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Topless in the Country of Hijab?

Posted by on Apr. 25, 2013 at 9:00 PM
  • 6 Replies

 Topless in the Country of Hijab?

Posted: 08/04/2013 00:01
 

 

'Muslim women against FEMEN' - we got a letter with this title after our worldwide demonstration Topless Jihad to support the Tunisian feminist Amina Tyler and the freedom of Arab women everywhere. I asked myself who are the authors of the letter? FEMEN is a movement with history, with ideology, a manifesto and clear activity. The letter is obviously written not in feminist rhetoric at all, they are making accusations of racism.

Being born in post USSR country (Ukraine) I know exactly that it's a common trait of dictatorial countries to promote the official position of the government pretending that it's backed by the people.

I don't deny the fact that there Muslim women who will say they are free and the hijab is their choice and right.

For example, like this sweet lady:

2013-04-07-younggirl.JPG


So, sisters, (I prefer to talk to women anyway, even knowing that behind them are bearded men with knives). You say to us that you are against Femen, but we are here for you and for all of us, as women are the modern slaves and it's never a question of colour of skin.

You say you live the way you want. Being fifth wife in harem the maximum you can be is the favorite wife... Right?

You say we talk about you because we are irritated only by bearded men who pray five times per day. We have enough bearded bastards in our part of the world, the beard of Russian patriarch Kirill (A Russian Orthodox bishop who is the big supporter of Putin) would win a competition of 'holy beards' and some people even say that he is so connected to God he is praying 30 times per day.

Sisters, we don't care how many times your men are praying, but we care a lot what do they do in between. We care a lot about violence and aggression, we care a lot when your fathers, brothers and husbands are raping and killing, when they call to stone your sisters, we care a lot when they burn embassies etc, and all that for Allah!

In our actions the people we are attacking are the ones who are constantly oppressing women, covering them, disrespecting them, raping them, beating them whether they are religious or not. But if they do it in name of religion then we can do nothing but tell them their religion is worth nothing.

We would never talk about Allah or Jesus and other fantasies if those fantasies did not affect human rights. You claim that we bring you our idea from our part of the world and you don't need it. The idea of freedom doesn't have anything to do with nationality or colour of skin. There are no set of human rights for Europeans and other for Arabs or Americans, its universal. And we are going to keep fighting for all of us, for our right for freedom. We are going to fight with you, with Arab women, like Aliaa Elmahdy (Egyptian internet activist), like Amina and I hope like you.

And you can put as many scarves as you want if you are free tomorrow to take it off and to put it back the next day but don't deny millions of your sisters who have fear behind their scarves, don't deny that there are million of your sisters who have been raped and killed because they are not following the wish of Allah! We are here to scream about that.

You say we are Islamophobes, just recently we heard from anti-gay Catholics that we are Christianophobes. Yes, I'm scared of all your religions because all of them are bleeding. I'm an atheist and I cannot say that you are atheistophobe as there is nothing that you can be scared of. You personally have rights to believe in whatever you want, the same as me but until the moment there are no stones, bullets and blood of your religion we are going to fight it.

Often, before going to sleep I dream about a world with religions that are only in your houses or churches and don't appear in other places. And do you know what I see? I see the world without Serbs, Croats and Muslims being massacred, without 9/11, without witch-hunts, without 7/7, a world without suicide bombers and without the Taliban, without Israeli/Palestinian wars, without persecution of Jews as 'Christ-killers', without Nothern Ireland troubles, without Crusades, a world where are no public beheadings of blasphemers and no flogging of female skin for the crime of showing an inch of it.

Good night!

See you on the battle lines!

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/inna-shevchenko/femen-topless-in-the-country-of-hijab_b_3034211.html?ncid=fcbklnkushpmg00000010&just_reloaded=1

by on Apr. 25, 2013 at 9:00 PM
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Replies (1-6):
LucyMom08
by Gold Member on Apr. 25, 2013 at 9:05 PM

 I came across this on FB...what do you think?

12hellokitty
by Ruby Member on Apr. 25, 2013 at 9:13 PM

LOL, sounds like some women don't need the "white women of FEMEN" to save them....

Jack_Squat
by Silver Member on Apr. 25, 2013 at 9:19 PM
That photo is a child :(
muslimahpj
by Ruby Member on Apr. 26, 2013 at 12:22 AM
1 mom liked this

This is why there is a campaign against FEMEN from muslim women around the world.

krysstizzle
by on Apr. 26, 2013 at 12:36 AM
1 mom liked this

Hmmm...

Lila Abu-Lughod is an anthropologist that really breaks down the whole "saving Muslim women from themselves" thing. Her writings really shaped my view of the whole thing. 

Here's a link to a good article by her.

A good excerpt: (forgive the errors, the formatting was weird to copy and paste)


Finally, I need to make a crucial point about veiling. Not only are there many forms of covering, which themselves have different meanings in the communities in which they are used, but also veiling itself must not be confused with, or made to stand for, lack of agency. As I have argued in my ethnography of a Bedouin community in Egypt in the late 1970s and 1980s (1986), pulling the black head cloth over the face in front of older respected men is considered a voluntary act by women who are deeply committed to being moral and have a sense of honor tied to family. One of the ways they show their standing is by covering their faces in certain contexts, They decide for whom they feel it is appropriate to veil, 

To take a very different case, the modern Islamic modest dress that many educated women across the Muslim world have taken on since the mid-1970s now both publicly marks piety and can be read as a sign of educated urban sophistication, a sort of modernity (e.g., Abu-Lughod 1995, 1998; Brenner 1996; El Guindi 1999; MacLeod 1991;Ong 1990), As Saba Mahmood (2001) has so brilliantly shown in her ethnography of women in the mosque movement in Egypt, this new form of dress is also perceived by many of the women who adopt it as part of a bodily means to cultivate virtue, the outcome of their professed desire to be close to God,

Two points emerge from this fairly basic discussion of the meanings of veiling in the contemporary Muslim world, First, we need to work against the reductive interpretation of veiling as the quintessential sign of women's unfreedom, even if we object to state imposition of this form, as in Iran or with the Taliban, (It must be recalled that the modernizing states of Turkey and Iran had earlier in the century banned veiling and required men, except religious clerics, to adopt Western dress.) What does freedom mean if we accept the fundamental premise that humans are social beings, always raised in certain social and historical contexts and belonging to particular communities that shape their desires and understandings of the world? Is it not a gross violation of women's own understandings of what they are doing to simply denounce the burqa as a medieval imposition? Second, we must take care not to reduce the diverse situations and attitudes of millions of Muslim women to a single item of clothing, Perhaps it is time to give up the Western obsession with the veil and focus on some serious issues with which feminists and others should indeed be concerned,

AlekD
by Gold Member on Apr. 26, 2013 at 12:41 AM
Interesting. Thanks for posting this, i look forward to reading the rest of the article.

Quoting krysstizzle:

Hmmm...

Lila Abu-Lughod is an anthropologist that really breaks down the whole "saving Muslim women from themselves" thing. Her writings really shaped my view of the whole thing. 

Here's a link to a good article by her.

A good excerpt: (forgive the errors, the formatting was weird to copy and paste)


Finally, I need to make a crucial point about veiling. Not only are there many forms of covering, which themselves have different meanings in the communities in which they are used, but also veiling itself must not be confused with, or made to stand for, lack of agency. As I have argued in my ethnography of a Bedouin community in Egypt in the late 1970s and 1980s (1986), pulling the black head cloth over the face in front of older respected men is considered a voluntary act by women who are deeply committed to being moral and have a sense of honor tied to family. One of the ways they show their standing is by covering their faces in certain contexts, They decide for whom they feel it is appropriate to veil, 

To take a very different case, the modern Islamic modest dress that many educated women across the Muslim world have taken on since the mid-1970s now both publicly marks piety and can be read as a sign of educated urban sophistication, a sort of modernity (e.g., Abu-Lughod 1995, 1998; Brenner 1996; El Guindi 1999; MacLeod 1991;Ong 1990), As Saba Mahmood (2001) has so brilliantly shown in her ethnography of women in the mosque movement in Egypt, this new form of dress is also perceived by many of the women who adopt it as part of a bodily means to cultivate virtue, the outcome of their professed desire to be close to God,

Two points emerge from this fairly basic discussion of the meanings of veiling in the contemporary Muslim world, First, we need to work against the reductive interpretation of veiling as the quintessential sign of women's unfreedom, even if we object to state imposition of this form, as in Iran or with the Taliban, (It must be recalled that the modernizing states of Turkey and Iran had earlier in the century banned veiling and required men, except religious clerics, to adopt Western dress.) What does freedom mean if we accept the fundamental premise that humans are social beings, always raised in certain social and historical contexts and belonging to particular communities that shape their desires and understandings of the world? Is it not a gross violation of women's own understandings of what they are doing to simply denounce the burqa as a medieval imposition? Second, we must take care not to reduce the diverse situations and attitudes of millions of Muslim women to a single item of clothing, Perhaps it is time to give up the Western obsession with the veil and focus on some serious issues with which feminists and others should indeed be concerned,

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