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What's the real reason you don't want your child to get an IEP?

Posted by on Apr. 29, 2013 at 5:13 PM
  • 162 Replies

Has your child's team of teachers ever suggested your child get tested or be provided with an IEP? If you declined to get tested or get an IEP for your child, what were your reasons.

If your child has an IEP what were some of the talking points that helped you decide to utilize an IEP?

by on Apr. 29, 2013 at 5:13 PM
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Replies (1-10):
mymanben
by Member on Apr. 29, 2013 at 5:18 PM
I got an IEP by reccomendation of his pedi for my son, than entered him in school from there (Pre-k). But here is a BUMP!
Elyssa414
by Member on Apr. 29, 2013 at 5:18 PM
My oldest and my foster son both have IEPs. But they are both on the more severe end of disabilities- and in self-contained classrooms with a full time nurse and aids.... I can't imagine why a parent wouldn't want an individualized education plan in place for a child that needs extra help to succeed. It sets clear standards and goals and keeps teachers and staff accountable.
Bieg9093
by Bronze Member on Apr. 29, 2013 at 5:42 PM
4 moms liked this

 I work with 2,3,4 year olds and am often the first person who suggests to parents that getting an eval is a good idea.  Plain and simple, most folks who resist don't want their kids "labeled."  They might recognize that their kids are struggling, but when they hear that they have to call the district's "special ed" office, they balk.  Often times, moms are okay but dads resist.  They worry that their kids will get teased or that they'll be stuck in sped forever.  They are old-fashioned...they believe the kids will just "grow out of it."

When I choose to approach a parent with this suggestion, I SELL it  That's what teahers don't do enough of.  They're wishy washy.  They are afraid to insult parents so they cushion their real thoughts.   It's not fair and often results in parents who have trouble making solid decisions on the matter.

poshkat
by Member on Apr. 29, 2013 at 5:46 PM
My son had an iep from age 2.5-5. I saw no reason to not have one, he obviously needed help. A lady I knew refused one for her son (same age as mine), because she didn't want it on his school records. She thought it would stop him from getting into a good college and thought he would be labeled as "special" or "slow" and ruin his school career.

krysstizzle
by DeepThought on Apr. 29, 2013 at 5:48 PM

Both of my kiddos have one; the oldest for gifted, the younger for dyslexia. I don't think it matters all that much, honestly. I mean, I do what I can to make sure their school day will benefit them as much as possible (hence, the iep's). But I consider the vast majority of their learning and education to come from me and the things we do together. 

KreatingMe
by Bronze Member on Apr. 29, 2013 at 5:49 PM
I have difficulty u derstanding parents who don't want to get help for their children. It especially bothers me when they say they don't want them labeled. My thoughts on that are if you want to fight labels you the parent ( generally speaking) have to start by accepting your child and his/her needs. Vent over, sorry I feel strongly about that. My child has an iep and he has had one since pre k, that is possible. He was in a private pre school and his teacher recommended he get an evaluation through a program through the public school for early intervention. My son passed his evaluation by one point but the evaluator was concerned and based on what I had shared with her, she chose to send him for further testing. The psychologist said he's on the edge of asperger's. We had to push for services , he's on the high functioning end. I think it was the best thing I did for him. He went to a special preschool that I think really prepared him for kindly. He's been in a general ed classroom and done very well in behavior and academics but he struggle socially. He's in first God. I don't think he would have been as successful as he has if it wasn't for th e staff at that preschool.
KreatingMe
by Bronze Member on Apr. 29, 2013 at 5:50 PM
2 moms liked this
I effin hate auto correct and this tablet. Grade! He is in first grade!

Quoting KreatingMe:

I have difficulty u derstanding parents who don't want to get help for their children. It especially bothers me when they say they don't want them labeled. My thoughts on that are if you want to fight labels you the parent ( generally speaking) have to start by accepting your child and his/her needs. Vent over, sorry I feel strongly about that. My child has an iep and he has had one since pre k, that is possible. He was in a private pre school and his teacher recommended he get an evaluation through a program through the public school for early intervention. My son passed his evaluation by one point but the evaluator was concerned and based on what I had shared with her, she chose to send him for further testing. The psychologist said he's on the edge of asperger's. We had to push for services , he's on the high functioning end. I think it was the best thing I did for him. He went to a special preschool that I think really prepared him for kindly. He's been in a general ed classroom and done very well in behavior and academics but he struggle socially. He's in first God. I don't think he would have been as successful as he has if it wasn't for th e staff at that preschool.
x_Starr_x
by Bronze Member on Apr. 29, 2013 at 5:53 PM
My son has had iep/ebd since grade k hes about to be 11 still iep/ebd and prob will be till he graduates best thing that ever happened to him.
Bigmetalchicken
by Silver Member on Apr. 29, 2013 at 5:53 PM

My son's PK2 teacher was very insistant that he was on the autism spectrum. I bit my lip, and smiled. He was two, not autistic.  I did not have him tested, because I knew that aside from a small delay in speech, he was fine. 

Now he is four, and besides still being slightly delayed in speech, he is fine. He is actually ahead of most 1st graders we know. 

LindaClement
by Linda on Apr. 29, 2013 at 5:53 PM
14 moms liked this

I think it's a tragedy in the school system that ALL children don't have individualized learning tailored to their skills and abilities and interests... 

Why does the majority have to suffer through all the same thing? Are they less individual than others?

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