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What's the real reason you don't want your child to get an IEP?

Has your child's team of teachers ever suggested your child get tested or be provided with an IEP? If you declined to get tested or get an IEP for your child, what were your reasons.

If your child has an IEP what were some of the talking points that helped you decide to utilize an IEP?

by on Apr. 29, 2013 at 5:13 PM
Replies (131-140):
katinahat
by Member on May. 1, 2013 at 9:31 AM

We are very blessed that we have the option to homeschool, which is what we will be doing. Her entire education will be an IEP lol.

____________________________________________________________

Christian, vaccinating, fun-loving, breastfeeding, cloth diapering, positive disciplining, nerdy, extended rear-facing, bookworm, creative, homeschooling, outdoorsy, autodidactic, friendly family.

"If you judge people, you have no time to love them." -- Mother Teresa

http://merrrfamily.blogspot.com/

fireangel5
by Gold Member on May. 1, 2013 at 9:45 AM
1 mom liked this

Being part time this year, I only teach 3out of 5 classes. I have 74 kids I see each day. At least 30 of those 75 have IEP's. I have no aide, there is no one else in the classroom with me. These kids have all different needs and accomodations. Trying to meet all of those needs, plus all of my other students, plus maintain control of the classroom and meet all of the ever changing demands of the administration plus keeping up with parents who want to be contacted weekly or even more frequently, plus plan, implement, instruct, assess, etc. And since I teach science, set up and take down regular labs for both biology and physics is overwhelming to say the least. Plus remember, I only get paid a part time salary. This is one of the main reasons I plan on leaving teaching. Very little support from the school/district, too little pay.  I only know one of the case workers for ONE of my students. The only time I hear from them is in the beginning of the school year when they send out the IEP's or if I get called into an IEP meeting as a general ed teacher. The case workers are overwhelmed to the point that they aren't really useful to the classroom teachers. 

Working full time I had 5 classes, so I still dealt with all of the above but with an additional 50 or so students. 


Quoting cjsbmom:


Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:


Quoting briellesmomma:

I think any parent that ignores their child's needs are morons. My DD doesn't have an iep yet and but she will soon when she transfers to cpse. It's not because I want her labeled (hate that stupid term) it's because you can clearly tell she needs something more that I can not help further with.

 I don't think they're 'morons'. I do feel like many people who are not well versed in education misunderstand what teachers are capable of. Special ed teachers typically devote a majority of their learning to understanding and utilizing different methods that are more individualized and tailor fit to a student's needs. Teachers who are not special ed certiied might be very aware that little Johnny has a problem but may not be able to meet his criteria for comprehending lessons and/or intervene in his behaviors that keep him and others from learning in a typical classroom setting.

Also, it's incredibly frustrating as a teacher to be responsible for delivering instructional and educational materials and lessons to a group of kids, up to 24 students, and deal with behaviors of a few that slow the entire class down. Mainstream teachers typically find a balance between lessons and classroom control. I realize that idea seems contentious to some people, too. Still, that is typically what a person should expect within the public school system.

And everything you've just complained about is exactly what an IEP is for. The students should have an aide if their behavior is disruptive enough to require one. But most school districts don't want to pay for an aide, so you have to fight them tooth and nail.

In our district, the learning support teacher oversees the IEP and helps the classroom teacher and the aides to administer it. It should never be left to the teacher to figure this stuff out. If it is, you (general) live in a shitty school district that cares neither about its teachers nor its students. 



cjsbmom
by Lois Lane on May. 1, 2013 at 10:07 AM

That is wrong and I'm sorry you have to deal with that. I'd be reaching out to those parents and telling them if they want what is best for their kids, they need to start going to school board meetings and pressing the administration to provide teachers with the tools they need to do the job. If that was my son's teacher, I wouldn't even have to be asked. I'd be the administration's worst nightmare until they did what was necessary to help out the classroom teacher. 

Quoting fireangel5:

Being part time this year, I only teach 3out of 5 classes. I have 74 kids I see each day. At least 30 of those 75 have IEP's. I have no aide, there is no one else in the classroom with me. These kids have all different needs and accomodations. Trying to meet all of those needs, plus all of my other students, plus maintain control of the classroom and meet all of the ever changing demands of the administration plus keeping up with parents who want to be contacted weekly or even more frequently, plus plan, implement, instruct, assess, etc. And since I teach science, set up and take down regular labs for both biology and physics is overwhelming to say the least. Plus remember, I only get paid a part time salary. This is one of the main reasons I plan on leaving teaching. Very little support from the school/district, too little pay.  I only know one of the case workers for ONE of my students. The only time I hear from them is in the beginning of the school year when they send out the IEP's or if I get called into an IEP meeting as a general ed teacher. The case workers are overwhelmed to the point that they aren't really useful to the classroom teachers. 

Working full time I had 5 classes, so I still dealt with all of the above but with an additional 50 or so students. 


Quoting cjsbmom:


Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:


Quoting briellesmomma:

I think any parent that ignores their child's needs are morons. My DD doesn't have an iep yet and but she will soon when she transfers to cpse. It's not because I want her labeled (hate that stupid term) it's because you can clearly tell she needs something more that I can not help further with.

 I don't think they're 'morons'. I do feel like many people who are not well versed in education misunderstand what teachers are capable of. Special ed teachers typically devote a majority of their learning to understanding and utilizing different methods that are more individualized and tailor fit to a student's needs. Teachers who are not special ed certiied might be very aware that little Johnny has a problem but may not be able to meet his criteria for comprehending lessons and/or intervene in his behaviors that keep him and others from learning in a typical classroom setting.

Also, it's incredibly frustrating as a teacher to be responsible for delivering instructional and educational materials and lessons to a group of kids, up to 24 students, and deal with behaviors of a few that slow the entire class down. Mainstream teachers typically find a balance between lessons and classroom control. I realize that idea seems contentious to some people, too. Still, that is typically what a person should expect within the public school system.

And everything you've just complained about is exactly what an IEP is for. The students should have an aide if their behavior is disruptive enough to require one. But most school districts don't want to pay for an aide, so you have to fight them tooth and nail.

In our district, the learning support teacher oversees the IEP and helps the classroom teacher and the aides to administer it. It should never be left to the teacher to figure this stuff out. If it is, you (general) live in a shitty school district that cares neither about its teachers nor its students. 





Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on May. 1, 2013 at 10:12 AM

I don't know about your district, but in our district when parents became PITA for the school's administration the fallout lands on the teachers and staff. PTO's, board meetings and random, constant emails as well as meeting with the superintendent is a much more efficient path IMO. Well, in our district anyway.

Quoting cjsbmom:

That is wrong and I'm sorry you have to deal with that. I'd be reaching out to those parents and telling them if they want what is best for their kids, they need to start going to school board meetings and pressing the administration to provide teachers with the tools they need to do the job. If that was my son's teacher, I wouldn't even have to be asked. I'd be the administration's worst nightmare until they did what was necessary to help out the classroom teacher. 

Quoting fireangel5:

Being part time this year, I only teach 3out of 5 classes. I have 74 kids I see each day. At least 30 of those 75 have IEP's. I have no aide, there is no one else in the classroom with me. These kids have all different needs and accomodations. Trying to meet all of those needs, plus all of my other students, plus maintain control of the classroom and meet all of the ever changing demands of the administration plus keeping up with parents who want to be contacted weekly or even more frequently, plus plan, implement, instruct, assess, etc. And since I teach science, set up and take down regular labs for both biology and physics is overwhelming to say the least. Plus remember, I only get paid a part time salary. This is one of the main reasons I plan on leaving teaching. Very little support from the school/district, too little pay.  I only know one of the case workers for ONE of my students. The only time I hear from them is in the beginning of the school year when they send out the IEP's or if I get called into an IEP meeting as a general ed teacher. The case workers are overwhelmed to the point that they aren't really useful to the classroom teachers. 

Working full time I had 5 classes, so I still dealt with all of the above but with an additional 50 or so students. 


Quoting cjsbmom:


Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:


Quoting briellesmomma:

I think any parent that ignores their child's needs are morons. My DD doesn't have an iep yet and but she will soon when she transfers to cpse. It's not because I want her labeled (hate that stupid term) it's because you can clearly tell she needs something more that I can not help further with.

 I don't think they're 'morons'. I do feel like many people who are not well versed in education misunderstand what teachers are capable of. Special ed teachers typically devote a majority of their learning to understanding and utilizing different methods that are more individualized and tailor fit to a student's needs. Teachers who are not special ed certiied might be very aware that little Johnny has a problem but may not be able to meet his criteria for comprehending lessons and/or intervene in his behaviors that keep him and others from learning in a typical classroom setting.

Also, it's incredibly frustrating as a teacher to be responsible for delivering instructional and educational materials and lessons to a group of kids, up to 24 students, and deal with behaviors of a few that slow the entire class down. Mainstream teachers typically find a balance between lessons and classroom control. I realize that idea seems contentious to some people, too. Still, that is typically what a person should expect within the public school system.

And everything you've just complained about is exactly what an IEP is for. The students should have an aide if their behavior is disruptive enough to require one. But most school districts don't want to pay for an aide, so you have to fight them tooth and nail.

In our district, the learning support teacher oversees the IEP and helps the classroom teacher and the aides to administer it. It should never be left to the teacher to figure this stuff out. If it is, you (general) live in a shitty school district that cares neither about its teachers nor its students. 





fireangel5
by Gold Member on May. 1, 2013 at 10:18 AM

Sadly, at both this district and the one I was in for 3 years prior, very few parents seem to care. They don't return calls or emails, i never see that at parent teachers, they cancel IEP meetings last minute, etc. I feel for these kids b/c its almost as if no one cares and they are falling thru the cracks regardless of all fo the services available to them.  I have two ESL students, one for Spanish and one the young man moved here from Africa. I honestly don't know how to help and the ESL instructor has come to my class a whooping 2 times since Nov. :-/

I see these kids just giving up. Once they hit a certain point, it's so difficult to pull them back in and engage them. They just check out. It's sad.

Teaching doesn't feel rewarding in the way I thought it would. Occasionaly when you literally watch a kid's face and witness the moment they grasp a concept, then to see the smile spread on their face, is really something. They meet your eyes and are so proud and love the fact that you are proud of them and acknowledge it :)  But sadly, it doesn't happen as often or I miss it while trying to manage the other students. 


Quoting cjsbmom:

That is wrong and I'm sorry you have to deal with that. I'd be reaching out to those parents and telling them if they want what is best for their kids, they need to start going to school board meetings and pressing the administration to provide teachers with the tools they need to do the job. If that was my son's teacher, I wouldn't even have to be asked. I'd be the administration's worst nightmare until they did what was necessary to help out the classroom teacher. 

Quoting fireangel5:

Being part time this year, I only teach 3out of 5 classes. I have 74 kids I see each day. At least 30 of those 75 have IEP's. I have no aide, there is no one else in the classroom with me. These kids have all different needs and accomodations. Trying to meet all of those needs, plus all of my other students, plus maintain control of the classroom and meet all of the ever changing demands of the administration plus keeping up with parents who want to be contacted weekly or even more frequently, plus plan, implement, instruct, assess, etc. And since I teach science, set up and take down regular labs for both biology and physics is overwhelming to say the least. Plus remember, I only get paid a part time salary. This is one of the main reasons I plan on leaving teaching. Very little support from the school/district, too little pay.  I only know one of the case workers for ONE of my students. The only time I hear from them is in the beginning of the school year when they send out the IEP's or if I get called into an IEP meeting as a general ed teacher. The case workers are overwhelmed to the point that they aren't really useful to the classroom teachers. 

Working full time I had 5 classes, so I still dealt with all of the above but with an additional 50 or so students. 


Quoting cjsbmom:


Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:


Quoting briellesmomma:

I think any parent that ignores their child's needs are morons. My DD doesn't have an iep yet and but she will soon when she transfers to cpse. It's not because I want her labeled (hate that stupid term) it's because you can clearly tell she needs something more that I can not help further with.

 I don't think they're 'morons'. I do feel like many people who are not well versed in education misunderstand what teachers are capable of. Special ed teachers typically devote a majority of their learning to understanding and utilizing different methods that are more individualized and tailor fit to a student's needs. Teachers who are not special ed certiied might be very aware that little Johnny has a problem but may not be able to meet his criteria for comprehending lessons and/or intervene in his behaviors that keep him and others from learning in a typical classroom setting.

Also, it's incredibly frustrating as a teacher to be responsible for delivering instructional and educational materials and lessons to a group of kids, up to 24 students, and deal with behaviors of a few that slow the entire class down. Mainstream teachers typically find a balance between lessons and classroom control. I realize that idea seems contentious to some people, too. Still, that is typically what a person should expect within the public school system.

And everything you've just complained about is exactly what an IEP is for. The students should have an aide if their behavior is disruptive enough to require one. But most school districts don't want to pay for an aide, so you have to fight them tooth and nail.

In our district, the learning support teacher oversees the IEP and helps the classroom teacher and the aides to administer it. It should never be left to the teacher to figure this stuff out. If it is, you (general) live in a shitty school district that cares neither about its teachers nor its students. 






kidlover2
by Bronze Member on May. 1, 2013 at 10:21 AM
My almost 4 year old was just " diagnosed" with CAPD. It's relieving to know it has nothing to do with my parenting and at the same time it gives me the help I need and ideas on how to help her... I'm not sure why being labeled is such a bad thing.

Although I should mention that when my exhusband found out he freaked and was afraid she was " retarded". So I guess I've seen both sides...
Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on May. 1, 2013 at 10:22 AM
1 mom liked this


Quoting kidlover2:

My almost 4 year old was just " diagnosed" with CAPD. It's relieving to know it has nothing to do with my parenting and at the same time it gives me the help I need and ideas on how to help her... I'm not sure why being labeled is such a bad thing.

I truly hope that your child gets a great team of teachers!

Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on May. 1, 2013 at 10:25 AM
1 mom liked this


Quoting kidlover2:

My almost 4 year old was just " diagnosed" with CAPD. It's relieving to know it has nothing to do with my parenting and at the same time it gives me the help I need and ideas on how to help her... I'm not sure why being labeled is such a bad thing.

Although I should mention that when my exhusband found out he freaked and was afraid she was " retarded". So I guess I've seen both sides...

also, if there aren't any other kids who also have CAPD you should know that the teachers have to request special materials from the curriculum. Make sure to bring that up, even if it's a casual email. I wouldn't wait for a meeting. Someone in the district, likely a media specialist will know how to properly extract the curriculum info to meet CAPD needs. Typically it's delivered visually through a tablet, ipad or lap top.

kidlover2
by Bronze Member on May. 1, 2013 at 10:30 AM
Thanks. This is all very new to me. They actually think I have it too since it's genetic and I have all the signs and symptoms... I've never been officially diagnosed. My mom has a huge fear of doctors and labels. My niece is definitely on the Aspergers spectrum but my mother has convinced that sister to homeschool and not to bring any knowledgeable people into my niece's life. :(

Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:


Quoting kidlover2:

My almost 4 year old was just " diagnosed" with CAPD. It's relieving to know it has nothing to do with my parenting and at the same time it gives me the help I need and ideas on how to help her... I'm not sure why being labeled is such a bad thing.



Although I should mention that when my exhusband found out he freaked and was afraid she was " retarded". So I guess I've seen both sides...

also, if there aren't any other kids who also have CAPD you should know that the teachers have to request special materials from the curriculum. Make sure to bring that up, even if it's a casual email. I wouldn't wait for a meeting. Someone in the district, likely a media specialist will know how to properly extract the curriculum info to meet CAPD needs. Typically it's delivered visually through a tablet, ipad or lap top.

cjsbmom
by Lois Lane on May. 1, 2013 at 1:21 PM

That is sad. 

Quoting fireangel5:

Sadly, at both this district and the one I was in for 3 years prior, very few parents seem to care. They don't return calls or emails, i never see that at parent teachers, they cancel IEP meetings last minute, etc. I feel for these kids b/c its almost as if no one cares and they are falling thru the cracks regardless of all fo the services available to them.  I have two ESL students, one for Spanish and one the young man moved here from Africa. I honestly don't know how to help and the ESL instructor has come to my class a whooping 2 times since Nov. :-/

I see these kids just giving up. Once they hit a certain point, it's so difficult to pull them back in and engage them. They just check out. It's sad.

Teaching doesn't feel rewarding in the way I thought it would. Occasionaly when you literally watch a kid's face and witness the moment they grasp a concept, then to see the smile spread on their face, is really something. They meet your eyes and are so proud and love the fact that you are proud of them and acknowledge it :)  But sadly, it doesn't happen as often or I miss it while trying to manage the other students. 


Quoting cjsbmom:

That is wrong and I'm sorry you have to deal with that. I'd be reaching out to those parents and telling them if they want what is best for their kids, they need to start going to school board meetings and pressing the administration to provide teachers with the tools they need to do the job. If that was my son's teacher, I wouldn't even have to be asked. I'd be the administration's worst nightmare until they did what was necessary to help out the classroom teacher. 

Quoting fireangel5:

Being part time this year, I only teach 3out of 5 classes. I have 74 kids I see each day. At least 30 of those 75 have IEP's. I have no aide, there is no one else in the classroom with me. These kids have all different needs and accomodations. Trying to meet all of those needs, plus all of my other students, plus maintain control of the classroom and meet all of the ever changing demands of the administration plus keeping up with parents who want to be contacted weekly or even more frequently, plus plan, implement, instruct, assess, etc. And since I teach science, set up and take down regular labs for both biology and physics is overwhelming to say the least. Plus remember, I only get paid a part time salary. This is one of the main reasons I plan on leaving teaching. Very little support from the school/district, too little pay.  I only know one of the case workers for ONE of my students. The only time I hear from them is in the beginning of the school year when they send out the IEP's or if I get called into an IEP meeting as a general ed teacher. The case workers are overwhelmed to the point that they aren't really useful to the classroom teachers. 

Working full time I had 5 classes, so I still dealt with all of the above but with an additional 50 or so students. 


Quoting cjsbmom:


Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:


Quoting briellesmomma:

I think any parent that ignores their child's needs are morons. My DD doesn't have an iep yet and but she will soon when she transfers to cpse. It's not because I want her labeled (hate that stupid term) it's because you can clearly tell she needs something more that I can not help further with.

 I don't think they're 'morons'. I do feel like many people who are not well versed in education misunderstand what teachers are capable of. Special ed teachers typically devote a majority of their learning to understanding and utilizing different methods that are more individualized and tailor fit to a student's needs. Teachers who are not special ed certiied might be very aware that little Johnny has a problem but may not be able to meet his criteria for comprehending lessons and/or intervene in his behaviors that keep him and others from learning in a typical classroom setting.

Also, it's incredibly frustrating as a teacher to be responsible for delivering instructional and educational materials and lessons to a group of kids, up to 24 students, and deal with behaviors of a few that slow the entire class down. Mainstream teachers typically find a balance between lessons and classroom control. I realize that idea seems contentious to some people, too. Still, that is typically what a person should expect within the public school system.

And everything you've just complained about is exactly what an IEP is for. The students should have an aide if their behavior is disruptive enough to require one. But most school districts don't want to pay for an aide, so you have to fight them tooth and nail.

In our district, the learning support teacher oversees the IEP and helps the classroom teacher and the aides to administer it. It should never be left to the teacher to figure this stuff out. If it is, you (general) live in a shitty school district that cares neither about its teachers nor its students. 








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