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What's the real reason you don't want your child to get an IEP?

Has your child's team of teachers ever suggested your child get tested or be provided with an IEP? If you declined to get tested or get an IEP for your child, what were your reasons.

If your child has an IEP what were some of the talking points that helped you decide to utilize an IEP?

by on Apr. 29, 2013 at 5:13 PM
Replies (141-150):
cjsbmom
by Lois Lane on May. 1, 2013 at 1:21 PM

We've actually had teachers and paras come to us and ask us to nag the administration here. It's the only way things get done. 

Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:

I don't know about your district, but in our district when parents became PITA for the school's administration the fallout lands on the teachers and staff. PTO's, board meetings and random, constant emails as well as meeting with the superintendent is a much more efficient path IMO. Well, in our district anyway.

Quoting cjsbmom:

That is wrong and I'm sorry you have to deal with that. I'd be reaching out to those parents and telling them if they want what is best for their kids, they need to start going to school board meetings and pressing the administration to provide teachers with the tools they need to do the job. If that was my son's teacher, I wouldn't even have to be asked. I'd be the administration's worst nightmare until they did what was necessary to help out the classroom teacher. 

Quoting fireangel5:

Being part time this year, I only teach 3out of 5 classes. I have 74 kids I see each day. At least 30 of those 75 have IEP's. I have no aide, there is no one else in the classroom with me. These kids have all different needs and accomodations. Trying to meet all of those needs, plus all of my other students, plus maintain control of the classroom and meet all of the ever changing demands of the administration plus keeping up with parents who want to be contacted weekly or even more frequently, plus plan, implement, instruct, assess, etc. And since I teach science, set up and take down regular labs for both biology and physics is overwhelming to say the least. Plus remember, I only get paid a part time salary. This is one of the main reasons I plan on leaving teaching. Very little support from the school/district, too little pay.  I only know one of the case workers for ONE of my students. The only time I hear from them is in the beginning of the school year when they send out the IEP's or if I get called into an IEP meeting as a general ed teacher. The case workers are overwhelmed to the point that they aren't really useful to the classroom teachers. 

Working full time I had 5 classes, so I still dealt with all of the above but with an additional 50 or so students. 


Quoting cjsbmom:


Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:


Quoting briellesmomma:

I think any parent that ignores their child's needs are morons. My DD doesn't have an iep yet and but she will soon when she transfers to cpse. It's not because I want her labeled (hate that stupid term) it's because you can clearly tell she needs something more that I can not help further with.

 I don't think they're 'morons'. I do feel like many people who are not well versed in education misunderstand what teachers are capable of. Special ed teachers typically devote a majority of their learning to understanding and utilizing different methods that are more individualized and tailor fit to a student's needs. Teachers who are not special ed certiied might be very aware that little Johnny has a problem but may not be able to meet his criteria for comprehending lessons and/or intervene in his behaviors that keep him and others from learning in a typical classroom setting.

Also, it's incredibly frustrating as a teacher to be responsible for delivering instructional and educational materials and lessons to a group of kids, up to 24 students, and deal with behaviors of a few that slow the entire class down. Mainstream teachers typically find a balance between lessons and classroom control. I realize that idea seems contentious to some people, too. Still, that is typically what a person should expect within the public school system.

And everything you've just complained about is exactly what an IEP is for. The students should have an aide if their behavior is disruptive enough to require one. But most school districts don't want to pay for an aide, so you have to fight them tooth and nail.

In our district, the learning support teacher oversees the IEP and helps the classroom teacher and the aides to administer it. It should never be left to the teacher to figure this stuff out. If it is, you (general) live in a shitty school district that cares neither about its teachers nor its students. 







cjsbmom
by Lois Lane on May. 1, 2013 at 4:24 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:


Quoting cjsbmom:


Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:


Quoting briellesmomma:

I think any parent that ignores their child's needs are morons. My DD doesn't have an iep yet and but she will soon when she transfers to cpse. It's not because I want her labeled (hate that stupid term) it's because you can clearly tell she needs something more that I can not help further with.

 I don't think they're 'morons'. I do feel like many people who are not well versed in education misunderstand what teachers are capable of. Special ed teachers typically devote a majority of their learning to understanding and utilizing different methods that are more individualized and tailor fit to a student's needs. Teachers who are not special ed certiied might be very aware that little Johnny has a problem but may not be able to meet his criteria for comprehending lessons and/or intervene in his behaviors that keep him and others from learning in a typical classroom setting.

Also, it's incredibly frustrating as a teacher to be responsible for delivering instructional and educational materials and lessons to a group of kids, up to 24 students, and deal with behaviors of a few that slow the entire class down. Mainstream teachers typically find a balance between lessons and classroom control. I realize that idea seems contentious to some people, too. Still, that is typically what a person should expect within the public school system.

And everything you've just complained about is exactly what an IEP is for. The students should have an aide if their behavior is disruptive enough to require one. But most school districts don't want to pay for an aide, so you have to fight them tooth and nail.

In our district, the learning support teacher oversees the IEP and helps the classroom teacher and the aides to administer it. It should never be left to the teacher to figure this stuff out. If it is, you (general) live in a shitty school district that cares neither about its teachers nor its students. 

I'm not sure I get what youmean when you stated that teachers shouldn't be left to figure it out.

Where is the money coming from to pay for support staff? (That's a real issue) Seemingly more and more children are in need of IEP's. We rely on paraprofessionals to work with a lot of these kids on IEP's. In our district all of the paras that work with special needs have to be certified as well as pursue continuing education all for the starting pay of $7.00 an hour. The turn over is ridicuous.

What I meant is, they should be given a clearly-written IEP and they should be provided with ideas on how to help the child meet the goals/needs outlined in the IEP by a learning support or special education professional within the district. Each one of our buildings has a learning support professional who oversees IEPs. They are the go-to person for the teacher if they need help. And then we have aides for students who are approved for them. Not every student with an IEP has an aide. 

And yes, it's expensive. When our district talks about budget cuts, they usually try to start with the paras. But we have a large population of special needs kids in our district, so the parents usually protest and they usually get their way. IMO, when the funding of athletic programs is taking precedent over the proper education of all eligible students in a district, then it's time to bitch. I understand that in some financially-strapped districts, that may not happen, and that's a shame for the kids. 


Ms.KitKat
by Platinum Member on May. 1, 2013 at 4:27 PM

 That is the teachers' job- to foster a love of learning in every child; encouarging the child's strengths while stregthening their weknesses. Fail to do that, fail the children. Sadly, there seems to be almost an epidemic of failed students who had /have teachers who fail to teach and parents who fail to support their teachers. An IEP is a program for the most vulnerable of students. I do not think it is unrealistic to provide for our chidlren a decent and proper education.

Quoting fireangel5:

 

No, I managed to find the unrealistic part. That was basically what your whole post was about. Individually tailored instruction for each child based on their needs, strengths, weaknesses no?

Shake away

Quoting Ms.KitKat:

 Out of my entire post you manage to find only negative.

SMFH

Quoting fireangel5:

 

Tailor make the curriculum for 100 kids? Keep track of IEP's, accomodations and special instructions for 100 kids? Not enough hours in the day for a single teacher to do that.

Quoting Ms.KitKat:

 I LOVE that my child has an IEP. In fact, I think ALL studentsshould have an IEP. Think about it, it just makes sense! Having an Individual Educational Plan prompts success both socially and academically for the student. Teachers tailor-make the curriculum to each and every child based on that child's needs; promoting success in learning by focusing and developing the student's strengths and supporting and remediating the student's weaknesses. I fight each and every year to maintain my child's IEP. I know that he has a full team of teachers supporting him and assistng him with his social and academic success. He has an automatic safety net. Every student deserves to have this!

I shake my head in disbelief when parents fight against the IEP. The fools! Those parents are doing a great disservice to their child; dooming thier child to school struggle if not failure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

DragonInfinity
by on May. 1, 2013 at 4:32 PM

 What is an IEP?

Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on May. 1, 2013 at 4:33 PM


Quoting cjsbmom:


Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:

What I meant is, they should be given a clearly-written IEP and they should be provided with ideas on how to help the child meet the goals/needs outlined in the IEP by a learning support or special education professional within the district. Each one of our buildings has a learning support professional who oversees IEPs. They are the go-to person for the teacher if they need help. And then we have aides for students who are approved for them. Not every student with an IEP has an aide. 

And yes, it's expensive. When our district talks about budget cuts, they usually try to start with the paras. But we have a large population of special needs kids in our district, so the parents usually protest and they usually get their way. IMO, when the funding of athletic programs is taking precedent over the proper education of all eligible students in a district, then it's time to bitch. I understand that in some financially-strapped districts, that may not happen, and that's a shame for the kids. 

Our district doesn't have a special ed director at the moment. We can't seem to keep one. It's my opinion that the former sped consultant left because she couldn't get every teacher to follow every single plan the way she envisioned it. She was the 3rd one to be hired and quit in 2 years.

I have 42 students in the district. Not one parent is interested in making an appointment for end of year IEP meetings. Our district has a mentoring program. Several high school students volunteer their time over the summer to tutor kids that sign up for a local tutoring program. So far none of the parents of my students have showed any interest. Sad.

fireangel5
by Gold Member on May. 1, 2013 at 4:36 PM

I'm sorry, it is impossible for one teacher to do as you first stated. To make seperate accomodations for 100 plus students daily is not practical nor reasonable.  This is different than providing a decent and proper education. You can teach a group and use a form of DI for them but to specifically accomodate that many individuals  wont be accomplished by one teacher. 


Quoting Ms.KitKat:

 That is the teachers' job- to foster a love of learning in every child; encouarging the child's strengths while stregthening their weknesses. Fail to do that, fail the children. Sadly, there seems to be almost an epidemic of failed students who had /have teachers who fail to teach and parents who fail to support their teachers. An IEP is a program for the most vulnerable of students. I do not think it is unrealistic to provide for our chidlren a decent and proper education.

Quoting fireangel5:


No, I managed to find the unrealistic part. That was basically what your whole post was about. Individually tailored instruction for each child based on their needs, strengths, weaknesses no?

Shake away

Quoting Ms.KitKat:

 Out of my entire post you manage to find only negative.

SMFH

Quoting fireangel5:


Tailor make the curriculum for 100 kids? Keep track of IEP's, accomodations and special instructions for 100 kids? Not enough hours in the day for a single teacher to do that.

Quoting Ms.KitKat:

 I LOVE that my child has an IEP. In fact, I think ALL studentsshould have an IEP. Think about it, it just makes sense! Having an Individual Educational Plan prompts success both socially and academically for the student. Teachers tailor-make the curriculum to each and every child based on that child's needs; promoting success in learning by focusing and developing the student's strengths and supporting and remediating the student's weaknesses. I fight each and every year to maintain my child's IEP. I know that he has a full team of teachers supporting him and assistng him with his social and academic success. He has an automatic safety net. Every student deserves to have this!

I shake my head in disbelief when parents fight against the IEP. The fools! Those parents are doing a great disservice to their child; dooming thier child to school struggle if not failure.



 



 



cjsbmom
by Lois Lane on May. 1, 2013 at 4:36 PM


Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:


Quoting cjsbmom:


Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:

What I meant is, they should be given a clearly-written IEP and they should be provided with ideas on how to help the child meet the goals/needs outlined in the IEP by a learning support or special education professional within the district. Each one of our buildings has a learning support professional who oversees IEPs. They are the go-to person for the teacher if they need help. And then we have aides for students who are approved for them. Not every student with an IEP has an aide. 

And yes, it's expensive. When our district talks about budget cuts, they usually try to start with the paras. But we have a large population of special needs kids in our district, so the parents usually protest and they usually get their way. IMO, when the funding of athletic programs is taking precedent over the proper education of all eligible students in a district, then it's time to bitch. I understand that in some financially-strapped districts, that may not happen, and that's a shame for the kids. 

Our district doesn't have a special ed director at the moment. We can't seem to keep one. It's my opinion that the former sped consultant left because she couldn't get every teacher to follow every single plan the way she envisioned it. She was the 3rd one to be hired and quit in 2 years.

I have 42 students in the district. Not one parent is interested in making an appointment for end of year IEP meetings. Our district has a mentoring program. Several high school students volunteer their time over the summer to tutor kids that sign up for a local tutoring program. So far none of the parents of my students have showed any interest. Sad.

Sounds like their is failure on many sides in your district. It's a shame when that happens, not only for the kids who need the help, but for the teachers who ultimately are left holding the bag. 


Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on May. 1, 2013 at 4:37 PM


Quoting DragonInfinity:

 What is an IEP?

Individualized Education Program/Plan

it's a goal sheet written by parents and educators to help children who need extra help meet goals set forth by curriculum/core standards. IEP's can be suggested or implemented for learning delays, physical impairments as well as behavioral issues.

Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on May. 1, 2013 at 4:39 PM

I get that it's hard for some people to understand that. I certainly don't strain myself trying to show people who aren't educators a glimpse of our world. Ideally Ms.K is right, though.

Quoting fireangel5:

I'm sorry, it is impossible for one teacher to do as you first stated. To make seperate accomodations for 100 plus students daily is not practical nor reasonable.  This is different than providing a decent and proper education. You can teach a group and use a form of DI for them but to specifically accomodate that many individuals  wont be accomplished by one teacher. 


Quoting Ms.KitKat:

 That is the teachers' job- to foster a love of learning in every child; encouarging the child's strengths while stregthening their weknesses. Fail to do that, fail the children. Sadly, there seems to be almost an epidemic of failed students who had /have teachers who fail to teach and parents who fail to support their teachers. An IEP is a program for the most vulnerable of students. I do not think it is unrealistic to provide for our chidlren a decent and proper education.

Ms.KitKat
by Platinum Member on May. 1, 2013 at 4:44 PM

 In a perfect world, wouldn;t that be nice. But I am a realist. For you take my musings as serious fightin' words is a little silly. You completely missed my point and rather than sit back and absorb the message as a whole, you picked it apart.  My point in my message: IEPs serve a valuable resource and tool by providing assistance to academic success. That is all..

Quoting fireangel5:

I'm sorry, it is impossible for one teacher to do as you first stated. To make seperate accomodations for 100 plus students daily is not practical nor reasonable.  This is different than providing a decent and proper education. You can teach a group and use a form of DI for them but to specifically accomodate that many individuals  wont be accomplished by one teacher. 

 

Quoting Ms.KitKat:

 That is the teachers' job- to foster a love of learning in every child; encouarging the child's strengths while stregthening their weknesses. Fail to do that, fail the children. Sadly, there seems to be almost an epidemic of failed students who had /have teachers who fail to teach and parents who fail to support their teachers. An IEP is a program for the most vulnerable of students. I do not think it is unrealistic to provide for our chidlren a decent and proper education.

Quoting fireangel5:

 

No, I managed to find the unrealistic part. That was basically what your whole post was about. Individually tailored instruction for each child based on their needs, strengths, weaknesses no?

Shake away

Quoting Ms.KitKat:

 Out of my entire post you manage to find only negative.

SMFH

Quoting fireangel5:

 

Tailor make the curriculum for 100 kids? Keep track of IEP's, accomodations and special instructions for 100 kids? Not enough hours in the day for a single teacher to do that.

Quoting Ms.KitKat:

 I LOVE that my child has an IEP. In fact, I think ALL studentsshould have an IEP. Think about it, it just makes sense! Having an Individual Educational Plan prompts success both socially and academically for the student. Teachers tailor-make the curriculum to each and every child based on that child's needs; promoting success in learning by focusing and developing the student's strengths and supporting and remediating the student's weaknesses. I fight each and every year to maintain my child's IEP. I know that he has a full team of teachers supporting him and assistng him with his social and academic success. He has an automatic safety net. Every student deserves to have this!

I shake my head in disbelief when parents fight against the IEP. The fools! Those parents are doing a great disservice to their child; dooming thier child to school struggle if not failure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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