Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

What's the real reason you don't want your child to get an IEP?

Has your child's team of teachers ever suggested your child get tested or be provided with an IEP? If you declined to get tested or get an IEP for your child, what were your reasons.

If your child has an IEP what were some of the talking points that helped you decide to utilize an IEP?

by on Apr. 29, 2013 at 5:13 PM
Replies (151-160):
fireangel5
by Gold Member on May. 1, 2013 at 4:49 PM


In a perfect world, it would be wonderful. And if  we as teachers were afforded a small cluster of aides/parapros, it might be something we could accomplish.  

 

Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:

I get that it's hard for some people to understand that. I certainly don't strain myself trying to show people who aren't educators a glimpse of our world. Ideally Ms.K is right, though.

Quoting fireangel5:

I'm sorry, it is impossible for one teacher to do as you first stated. To make seperate accomodations for 100 plus students daily is not practical nor reasonable.  This is different than providing a decent and proper education. You can teach a group and use a form of DI for them but to specifically accomodate that many individuals  wont be accomplished by one teacher. 


Quoting Ms.KitKat:

 That is the teachers' job- to foster a love of learning in every child; encouarging the child's strengths while stregthening their weknesses. Fail to do that, fail the children. Sadly, there seems to be almost an epidemic of failed students who had /have teachers who fail to teach and parents who fail to support their teachers. An IEP is a program for the most vulnerable of students. I do not think it is unrealistic to provide for our chidlren a decent and proper education.



DragonInfinity
by Member on May. 1, 2013 at 4:49 PM

 Thanks for the explanation! It was called something different when I was in school (what Idk).....I had one when I was in elementary school......I guess if my kids needed one I would get it....(however you say that)

Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:


Quoting DragonInfinity:

 What is an IEP?

Individualized Education Program/Plan

it's a goal sheet written by parents and educators to help children who need extra help meet goals set forth by curriculum/core standards. IEP's can be suggested or implemented for learning delays, physical impairments as well as behavioral issues.

 

Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safety in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and screaming, "WOO HOO, what a ride!!!"

Cherish77
by on May. 1, 2013 at 5:19 PM

I've never been asked. But my kids don't need one as far as I can tell.

LindaClement
by Thatwoman on May. 1, 2013 at 7:38 PM

Actually, it's the school's decision. Schools here --public and private- can legally have a ratio of 35:1.

Quoting TCgirlatheart:

Right, because that is what they need in order to be licensed/legal.  The theory and pedagogy, however, can support more children with less adults.  

In our state the ratio requirements differ for age groups as well.  

Quoting LindaClement:

All the ones here use 10-12 kids per room, much closer to daycare laws than what schools are allowed to get away with...

Quoting TCgirlatheart:

A Montessori classroom, a good one, is set-up to require only one adult per 20-30 children.  State regulations will have different requirements.  

It's the quality of adults and materials that would be the larger expense.  

Quoting LindaClement:

My kids' education was exactly like a library: do what you want, for as long as you want, until you want to do something else. Delve as deeply as you want, in any subject you're interested in...

If you take out a pile of books about dinosaurs and it turns out none of them are interesting to you, feel free to take them back and get something else.

The reason both you and I know that the methodology used in the great montessori-style schools is not going to be adopted mainstream is money. No one is going to pay for that many babysitters per student...

Quoting KreatingMe:

The school my son went to wasn't that far off from a library. There is no teacher standing in the front of the room giving one lesson to all the students who are expected to learn the same thing at the same place. There are individual students working on their own work scattered around the rooms d small groups of students who have chosen to work together. The direct ress and assistant go around and give individual lessons and observing progress. I've heard many a parent say they wish they could hang out in the school it was such a unique and wonderful environment.

Quoting LindaClement:

That would be a start... I'd prefer them to be revamped more like a public library.

Quoting KreatingMe:

That's why public schools need to be revamped and teach the Montessori way, each student at his or her pace. :-)



Quoting LindaClement:

I think it's a tragedy in the school system that ALL children don't have individualized learning tailored to their skills and abilities and interests... 

Why does the majority have to suffer through all the same thing? Are they less individual than others?







TCgirlatheart
by TC on May. 1, 2013 at 7:40 PM
Ok. Sorry, I was thinking of pre-school aged. However, we're talking about elementary. My bad. :-(

Quoting LindaClement:

Actually, it's the school's decision. Schools here --public and private- can legally have a ratio of 35:1.

Quoting TCgirlatheart:

Right, because that is what they need in order to be licensed/legal.  The theory and pedagogy, however, can support more children with less adults.  

In our state the ratio requirements differ for age groups as well.  

Quoting LindaClement:

All the ones here use 10-12 kids per room, much closer to daycare laws than what schools are allowed to get away with...

Quoting TCgirlatheart:

A Montessori classroom, a good one, is set-up to require only one adult per 20-30 children.  State regulations will have different requirements.  

It's the quality of adults and materials that would be the larger expense.  

Quoting LindaClement:

My kids' education was exactly like a library: do what you want, for as long as you want, until you want to do something else. Delve as deeply as you want, in any subject you're interested in...

If you take out a pile of books about dinosaurs and it turns out none of them are interesting to you, feel free to take them back and get something else.

The reason both you and I know that the methodology used in the great montessori-style schools is not going to be adopted mainstream is money. No one is going to pay for that many babysitters per student...

Quoting KreatingMe:

The school my son went to wasn't that far off from a library. There is no teacher standing in the front of the room giving one lesson to all the students who are expected to learn the same thing at the same place. There are individual students working on their own work scattered around the rooms d small groups of students who have chosen to work together. The direct ress and assistant go around and give individual lessons and observing progress. I've heard many a parent say they wish they could hang out in the school it was such a unique and wonderful environment.



Quoting LindaClement:

That would be a start... I'd prefer them to be revamped more like a public library.

Quoting KreatingMe:

That's why public schools need to be revamped and teach the Montessori way, each student at his or her pace. :-)





Quoting LindaClement:

I think it's a tragedy in the school system that ALL children don't have individualized learning tailored to their skills and abilities and interests... 

Why does the majority have to suffer through all the same thing? Are they less individual than others?







LindaClement
by Thatwoman on May. 1, 2013 at 7:42 PM
1 mom liked this

No problem ... my last reply, I forgot the distinction, too :D

Quoting TCgirlatheart:

Ok. Sorry, I was thinking of pre-school aged. However, we're talking about elementary. My bad. :-(

Quoting LindaClement:

Actually, it's the school's decision. Schools here --public and private- can legally have a ratio of 35:1.

Quoting TCgirlatheart:

Right, because that is what they need in order to be licensed/legal.  The theory and pedagogy, however, can support more children with less adults.  

In our state the ratio requirements differ for age groups as well.  

Quoting LindaClement:

All the ones here use 10-12 kids per room, much closer to daycare laws than what schools are allowed to get away with...

Quoting TCgirlatheart:

A Montessori classroom, a good one, is set-up to require only one adult per 20-30 children.  State regulations will have different requirements.  

It's the quality of adults and materials that would be the larger expense.  

Quoting LindaClement:

My kids' education was exactly like a library: do what you want, for as long as you want, until you want to do something else. Delve as deeply as you want, in any subject you're interested in...

If you take out a pile of books about dinosaurs and it turns out none of them are interesting to you, feel free to take them back and get something else.

The reason both you and I know that the methodology used in the great montessori-style schools is not going to be adopted mainstream is money. No one is going to pay for that many babysitters per student...

Quoting KreatingMe:

The school my son went to wasn't that far off from a library. There is no teacher standing in the front of the room giving one lesson to all the students who are expected to learn the same thing at the same place. There are individual students working on their own work scattered around the rooms d small groups of students who have chosen to work together. The direct ress and assistant go around and give individual lessons and observing progress. I've heard many a parent say they wish they could hang out in the school it was such a unique and wonderful environment.



Quoting LindaClement:

That would be a start... I'd prefer them to be revamped more like a public library.

Quoting KreatingMe:

That's why public schools need to be revamped and teach the Montessori way, each student at his or her pace. :-)





Quoting LindaClement:

I think it's a tragedy in the school system that ALL children don't have individualized learning tailored to their skills and abilities and interests... 

Why does the majority have to suffer through all the same thing? Are they less individual than others?








joyfulmom30
by Member on May. 1, 2013 at 8:11 PM

BUMP!

kailu1835
by Ruby Member on May. 1, 2013 at 8:38 PM
I have another reason to share. A friend of mine has a daughter who has had an iep since pre-k. Now she is extremely limited on schooling/work options because the state requires that she get her kid to her iep classes every day. She is a single mom and constructing work around getting her daughter from one school to another in the middle of the day is ridiculous. She wishes she had never gotten her the iep and just gotten tutors.
Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on May. 1, 2013 at 8:51 PM


Quoting kailu1835:

I have another reason to share. A friend of mine has a daughter who has had an iep since pre-k. Now she is extremely limited on schooling/work options because the state requires that she get her kid to her iep classes every day. She is a single mom and constructing work around getting her daughter from one school to another in the middle of the day is ridiculous. She wishes she had never gotten her the iep and just gotten tutors.

I don't understand how a district can demand that parents transport a student between schools in one day for classes. How bizarre. Sounds like they lack funding and want to be sure she misses meetings and classes so they can drop her kid.

kailu1835
by Ruby Member on May. 1, 2013 at 8:57 PM
She goes to alternative school (through the public education system) because she would be quickly crushed in regular middle school. So it was either put her in middle school and basically throw her to the wolves and watch her love for life and learning die, or put her in the alternative school and transport her to the middle school in the middle of the day so she can get to her iep classes. Hell of an option if you ask me :(

Quoting Veni.Vidi.Vici.:


Quoting kailu1835:

I have another reason to share. A friend of mine has a daughter who has had an iep since pre-k. Now she is extremely limited on schooling/work options because the state requires that she get her kid to her iep classes every day. She is a single mom and constructing work around getting her daughter from one school to another in the middle of the day is ridiculous. She wishes she had never gotten her the iep and just gotten tutors.

I don't understand how a district can demand that parents transport a student between schools in one day for classes. How bizarre. Sounds like they lack funding and want to be sure she misses meetings and classes so they can drop her kid.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)