Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

What's the real reason you don't want your child to get an IEP?

Has your child's team of teachers ever suggested your child get tested or be provided with an IEP? If you declined to get tested or get an IEP for your child, what were your reasons.

If your child has an IEP what were some of the talking points that helped you decide to utilize an IEP?

by on Apr. 29, 2013 at 5:13 PM
Replies (41-50):
Ms.KitKat
by Platinum Member on Apr. 29, 2013 at 8:25 PM

 That is so sad. Those parents need to make their needs known at the BOE meetings!

Quoting katy_kay08:

my friend's son doesn't get the assistance instead his teacher uses it as an excuse to send him out into the hall or to the principal's office.  Not every student has a positive IEP experience.  

Our district has also started essentially segregating the special needs students into specific schools.  The high achievers are bused to 2 different schools in the district and the special needs kids are bused to a couple of the schools, and incidentally the schools chosen are the schools with the least active PTA and the fewest extra curricular activities.  Unfortunately the schools' budgets go to provide aides so the kids that do not fall into either category miss out on all the extras happening at the schools without the influx of high needs children.  

Quoting cjsbmom:

My son has had an IEP since he started school at my insistence. He was diagnosed with high functioning autism at age 3, so I knew he'd need the assistance. It contains provisions for an aide in the classroom, plus a behavior plan. 

Another little boy in his class who has the same diagnosis just now got an IEP after three years of struggling. His parents were afraid to get him one because they didn't want him to be "labeled." I have never understood this rationale. Your child already has a diagnosis, and he's acting out in class because his needs aren't being met. So he already has a label as a difficult child. Why not put a real face on it and get that child the help he needs?



 

Ms.KitKat
by Platinum Member on Apr. 29, 2013 at 8:30 PM

 Absolutley! You MUST stay on top of it. Every year at back to school night, I introduce myself to each of my child's teachers (and he is in high school now). I let each teacher know who I am, who my child is and then ask if the have any questions about his IEP (while ever so subltely telling each teacher what the IEP covers). Then I also make sure each teacher has my cell phone number and email (and I get theirs). An IEP does not mean as a parent, you can stop parenting or teaching. A parent MUST stay on top of it and maintain communication with teachers. And at a monets notice, I have no problem calling his case manager to discuss an issue and try to tweak his IEP even mid-year.

 

Quoting cjsbmom:

You are absolutely right about that. Mine hasn't always been positive. I have to stay on top of it, absolutely. In fact, it's taken a lot of me being there and reminding them this is a legal document they *have* to follow to get them to abide by it. Just because a child has an IEP does not mean it will be followed. I've learned that one the hard way. 

Quoting katy_kay08:

my friend's son doesn't get the assistance instead his teacher uses it as an excuse to send him out into the hall or to the principal's office.  Not every student has a positive IEP experience.  

Our district has also started essentially segregating the special needs students into specific schools.  The high achievers are bused to 2 different schools in the district and the special needs kids are bused to a couple of the schools, and incidentally the schools chosen are the schools with the least active PTA and the fewest extra curricular activities.  Unfortunately the schools' budgets go to provide aides so the kids that do not fall into either category miss out on all the extras happening at the schools without the influx of high needs children.  

Quoting cjsbmom:

My son has had an IEP since he started school at my insistence. He was diagnosed with high functioning autism at age 3, so I knew he'd need the assistance. It contains provisions for an aide in the classroom, plus a behavior plan. 

Another little boy in his class who has the same diagnosis just now got an IEP after three years of struggling. His parents were afraid to get him one because they didn't want him to be "labeled." I have never understood this rationale. Your child already has a diagnosis, and he's acting out in class because his needs aren't being met. So he already has a label as a difficult child. Why not put a real face on it and get that child the help he needs?




 

toomanypoodles
by Ruby Member on Apr. 29, 2013 at 8:30 PM

 Not even sure what that is.  I homeschool. 

desertlvn
by Silver Member on Apr. 29, 2013 at 8:31 PM
1 mom liked this


Make a written request. Give a copy to the school director, a copy to the SpEd director, and a copy to the teacher. They are then REQUIRED to test. Our state must test within 60 days of a parent request.

Quoting unspecified42:

His teacher recommended it, but the school won't test him because he isn't failing. Won't offer occupational therapy that his pediatrician recommended because he isn't learning disabled. Luckily our insurance will cover it come July.



MrsImperfect
by Bronze Member on Apr. 29, 2013 at 8:33 PM
I never knew about ieps until my sons school automatically put him on one for a speech impediment. Although my other son needs one more they wouldnt for him :-/ I did online schooling this year and it didnt help. So back to regular school and forcing one.
canadianmom1974
by Gold Member on Apr. 29, 2013 at 8:33 PM
Some of our students assist the custodian, but only assist. Usually they help her empty garbages, no mopping or cleaning bathrooms - though that's pretty much all done after school hours anyway.

Every one of our students has an IEP, and we have a wide variety of students, diagnoses and functioning levels. We have students whose goals might include things as simple as printing their name and correctly identifying 5 colours, and those whose goals include having a completed resume and identify and apply at appropriate job sites.


Quoting katy_kay08:

Also our district also was caught using the special needs high school students as janitors.  This is not a "needs friendly" school district.  The distict excuse is that this is "occupational training"

Posted on CafeMom Mobile
unspecified42
by Bronze Member on Apr. 29, 2013 at 8:36 PM
They said they will only test if the child is failing, which he isn't. We are moving to another state this summer so I may talk to his next school about it if we don't end up doing private school.


Quoting desertlvn:


Make a written request. Give a copy to the school director, a copy to the SpEd director, and a copy to the teacher. They are then REQUIRED to test. Our state must test within 60 days of a parent request.


Quoting unspecified42:

His teacher recommended it, but the school won't test him because he isn't failing. Won't offer occupational therapy that his pediatrician recommended because he isn't learning disabled. Luckily our insurance will cover it come July.





Posted on CafeMom Mobile
desertlvn
by Silver Member on Apr. 29, 2013 at 8:38 PM


Did you put your request in writing? It is law.

Quoting unspecified42:

They said they will only test if the child is failing, which he isn't. We are moving to another state this summer so I may talk to his next school about it if we don't end up doing private school.


Quoting desertlvn:


Make a written request. Give a copy to the school director, a copy to the SpEd director, and a copy to the teacher. They are then REQUIRED to test. Our state must test within 60 days of a parent request.


Quoting unspecified42:

His teacher recommended it, but the school won't test him because he isn't failing. Won't offer occupational therapy that his pediatrician recommended because he isn't learning disabled. Luckily our insurance will cover it come July.







JMmama
by Bronze Member on Apr. 29, 2013 at 8:44 PM
You are lucky. My oldest is gifted and did not get an iep because in Nevada IEPs are only if you are behind. We recently moved and I'm not sure how it is here because they don't do gifted evals until 3rd grade. I guess we will find out in the fall.

Quoting krysstizzle:

Gifted students here have IEPs. I think it falls under 'secondary exceptionality'; whereas my youngest falls under 'primary exceptionality'. (Not sure how they have those categories lumped, I don't know what other things fall under each).

I just assumed all states did this. 

I'm in New Mexico, btw. Perhaps it varies by state?

ETA: we did the IEP after testing was done to determine if he qualified for the gifted program at the behest of his teacher. Same process as my youngest, laid out goals and whatnot.

Quoting btamilee:

 I have worked within the school system for 13 years, and I have never heard of an IEP for gifted students?  When my youngest daughter was in middle school she did do testing, and went into a so called gifted program in English, but the test was not an IEP.  She is now a Junior in High School and is taking several AP courses, and has never had an IEP.  Can you tell me more about this??  You have me curious...




Quoting krysstizzle:


Both of my kiddos have one; the oldest for gifted, the younger for dyslexia. I don't think it matters all that much, honestly. I mean, I do what I can to make sure their school day will benefit them as much as possible (hence, the iep's). But I consider the vast majority of their learning and education to come from me and the things we do together. 






DestinyHLewis
by Destiny on Apr. 29, 2013 at 8:44 PM


My Dd has an IEP and it is specifically for speech. Here they do an IEP for any extra schooling (help wise) or advanced schooling, (like gifted). I don't blame you for not wanting to classify him on the spectrum at 2, but a speech therapy IEP would probably be beneficial for him especially now at his young age. Jmo of course, but it has helped my dd quite a bit, especially where reading skills are concerned. Her speech issues were affecting how she sounded out letters, and thus her reading. 

Speech isn't something I can fix at home. I found that out really quick when I talked with my girlfriend who is a speech pathologist and learned all that goes into correcting it. Lol I can reinforce it, but I wouldn't have been able to do it alone. Anyway, you might want to look into speech therapy for him now before it becomes a reading issue. I wish my daughter had started it at 4 years old. 

(I assume you meant your son is in Preschool, not 1st? )

Quoting Bigmetalchicken:

My son's PK2 teacher was very insistant that he was on the autism spectrum. I bit my lip, and smiled. He was two, not autistic.  I did not have him tested, because I knew that aside from a small delay in speech, he was fine. 

Now he is four, and besides still being slightly delayed in speech, he is fine. He is actually ahead of most 1st graders we know. 



Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN