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Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Under new bullying law, kid who called classmate 'fat' goes to court

Posted by on Apr. 30, 2013 at 10:16 AM
  • 16 Replies


After enacting the strictest anti-bullying law in the country, the state of New Jersey must now hold trials for kids who call each other names on the playground.

An eighth-grader in the village of Ridgewood who allegedly called a girl “horse,” “fat,” and “fat ass” is just one of a dozen cases that suggest the 2011 law went too far in criminalizing bullying, according to The Star-Ledger.

The boy denied calling his classmate any name other than “horse.”

“I never made any remarks other than horse,” he said in his testimony. “I did not have any intent.”

The boy’s family insisted on having the case brought to trial. In effect, they are appealing the decision to add a bullying charge to his permanent record, which they worry could harm his college chances later in life.

“I don’t feel what my son said to this young woman constitutes violation of the harassment, intimidation and bullying law,” said the boy’s father. “It’s possible that this could track my son through college graduation.”

At least 15 other families have gone to trial to dispute charges leveled under the Anti-Bullying Bill of Rights. Many other students are in the process of initiating appeals.

It’s an unintended result of the law, which took effect in 2011. Designed to combat the kind of ritualistic and pervasive abuse that led to the suicide of bullied Rutgers University freshman Tyler Clementi, the law raises questions about the line between offensive speech and harassment.



Some of the other pending cases underscore this difficulty. One couple insists their daughter’s math teacher bullied her by calling attention to her inappropriately short skirt. A male student faces a bullying charge for retweeting a list of female classmates’ names with the word “grenade” written next to them. In the context of the tweet, the word “grenade” means marking the girls as “the ugly girl always found with a group of hotties,” according to urbandictionary.com.

Several lawmakers and education administrators discussed the law’s scope and ramifications at a recent conference in Newark.

“Where do you go from a speech issue to where you crossed the line?” asked New Jersey Attorney General Jeffrey Chiesa at the conference, according to to NJ Spotlight. “Where is the line to where government has a role when certain kinds of behaviors should be penalized?”





http://dailycaller.com/2013/04/29/under-strict-bullying-law-kid-who-called-classmate-horse-and-fat-ass-goes-to-court/

by on Apr. 30, 2013 at 10:16 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Woodbabe
by Woodie on Apr. 30, 2013 at 10:24 AM
1 mom liked this

Incredible. What's amazing is how this bleeds into the workforce and nothing can get done until you've stroked ever person until they purr...

HopesNDreams
by on Apr. 30, 2013 at 10:30 AM
How sad that parents feel the need to spend huge amounts of money to drag this to court. Their nasty child called another names. The shame of that could follow the victim for life. Perhaps more parents should be educated on the law and raise decent children who don't feel the need to belittle others.
owl0210
by Bronze Member on Apr. 30, 2013 at 10:30 AM
How ridiculous.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
SuperChicken
by on Apr. 30, 2013 at 10:31 AM

Lol, the irony of you calling someone names while saying the shame of them doing the same should ruin them for life.    I'm not sure if you're joking or not, but it's funny.


Quoting HopesNDreams:

How sad that parents feel the need to spend huge amounts of money to drag this to court. Their nasty child called another names. The shame of that could follow the victim for life. Perhaps more parents should be educated on the law and raise decent children who don't feel the need to belittle others.


 

Ziva65
by Gold Member on Apr. 30, 2013 at 10:32 AM

Interesting statement: "Where do you go from a speech issue to where you crossed the line"- I suppose the courts still have to define that? IDK. I suppose when I was young the namecalling was no better, but we bucked up and made it through. Now it seems kids take more action, IDK. We can't protect them from everything, and then where is the line? I've seen far worse name calling than that, are we going to fill the courts?

My kids go to a private Christian school- we've seen more bullying there than in the public school my son now attends for HS. One kid the other day brought a scale to school to tease a girl about her weight- haven't heard what happened. But I think nothing will... the difference though is an action was taken, just like with social media, there was an action, and that is written or image form. I am curious though about where judges will define the "line".

Some of these terms I've not heard "grenade" ok, in my day the ugly girl was a "dog" and then who is to define ugly, some prepubescant boy. My son was telling me the other day about a kid who asked if he "burned" at least my son figure out that was "pot".

Mommy4000
by Ray of sunshine on Apr. 30, 2013 at 10:33 AM
1 mom liked this

Teach children not to use nasty behavior and these things don't have to happen.

Euphoric
by Bazinga! on Apr. 30, 2013 at 10:35 AM

drinking 

Lizardannie1966
by on Apr. 30, 2013 at 10:35 AM
1 mom liked this

I'm not sure how I feel about this.

I am HUGELY against any type of bullying from on the playground to the Internet.

But I'm thinking of my generation and even generations before mine and after who spent many a recess on a playground calling another kid a "doody face" or "scum sucker" and because we were mean little shits who needed discipline and some guidance on what to say and not say.

Should we have been to court, though? I'm not sure.

Ziva65
by Gold Member on Apr. 30, 2013 at 10:37 AM

 

Agreed. Sadly, some parents act just as badly :(

Quoting Mommy4000:

Teach children not to use nasty behavior and these things don't have to happen.


 

marmie41
by Member on Apr. 30, 2013 at 10:44 AM
Pot meet kettle.


Quoting HopesNDreams:

How sad that parents feel the need to spend huge amounts of money to drag this to court. Their nasty child called another names. The shame of that could follow the victim for life. Perhaps more parents should be educated on the law and raise decent children who don't feel the need to belittle others.

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