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PENTAGON CONFIRMS MAY COURT MARTIAL SOLDIERS WHO SHARE CHRISTIAN FAITH

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This would include ANY faith...thoughts?

http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Peace/2013/05/01/Breaking-Pentagon-Confirms-Will-Court-Martial-Soldiers-Who-Share-Christian-Faith

BREAKING: PENTAGON CONFIRMS MAY COURT MARTIAL SOLDIERS WHO SHARE CHRISTIAN FAITH


The Pentagon has released a statement confirming that soldiers could be prosecuted for promoting their faith: "Religious proselytization is not permitted within the Department of Defense...Court martials and non-judicial punishments are decided on a case-by-case basis...”. 

The statement, released to Fox News, follows a Breitbart News report on Obama administration Pentagon appointees meeting with anti-Christian extremist Mikey Weinstein to develop court-martial procedures to punish Christians in the military who express or share their faith. 

(From our earlier report: Weinstein is the head of the Military Religious Freedom Foundation, and says Christians--including chaplains--sharing the gospel of Jesus Christ in the military are guilty of “treason,” and of committing an act of “spiritual rape” as serious a crime as “sexual assault.” He also asserted that Christians sharing their faith in the military are “enemies of the Constitution.”)

Being convicted in a court martial means that a soldier has committed a crime under federal military law. Punishment for a court martial can include imprisonment and being dishonorably discharged from the military. 

So President Barack Obama’s civilian appointees who lead the Pentagon are confirming that the military will make it a crime--possibly resulting in imprisonment--for those in uniform to share their faith. This would include chaplains—military officers who are ordained clergymen of their faith (mostly Christian pastors or priests, or Jewish rabbis)--whose duty since the founding of the U.S. military under George Washington is to teach their faith and minister to the spiritual needs of troops who come to them for counsel, instruction, or comfort.

This regulation would severely limit expressions of faith in the military, even on a one-to-one basis between close friends. It could also effectively abolish the position of chaplain in the military, as it would not allow chaplains (or any service members, for that matter), to say anything about their faith that others say led them to think they were being encouraged to make faith part of their life. It’s difficult to imagine how a member of the clergy could give spiritual counseling without saying anything that might be perceived in that fashion.

In response to the Pentagon’s plans, retired Lt. Gen. Jerry Boykin, who is now executive vice president of the Family Research Council (FRC), said on Fox & Friends Wednesday morning:

It’s a matter of what do they mean by "proselytizing." ...I think they’ve got their defintions a little confused. If you’re talking about coercion that’s one thing, but if you’re talking about the free exercise of our faith as individual soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines, especially for the chaplains, they I think the worst thing we can do is stop the ability for a soldier to be able to exercise his faith.”

FRC has launched a petition here which has already collected over 30,000 signatures, calling on Secretary Hagel is stop working with Weinstein and his anti-Christian organization to develop military policy regarding religious faith.

**UPDATE**

The FRC petition has now exceeded more than 40,000 signatures at the time of this update.

 Sexy If its unladylike, fattening or fun, I'm in!
  

by on May. 1, 2013 at 7:42 PM
Replies (21-30):
LauraKW
by "Dude!" on May. 1, 2013 at 8:48 PM
You know this is being taken entirely out of context to inflame people, right? And it's working.

Quoting fireangel5:

That is completely ridiculous. Why shouldn't soldiers of any faith be able to be blessed, pray with others of their faith, receive communion, go to confession, etc? Why should a soldier not be able to talk with another religious person about their faith? How are religious members sharing a prayer or mass bothering others? I can understand saying you can't try to talk to non religious or those who don't want to hear about your faith, but to keep people from practicing their faith 

fireangel5
by Gold Member on May. 1, 2013 at 9:05 PM

I'm hoping wording will be very very specific and not include ridding the military of clergy and all of the restrictions mentioned in  the article. But you're right. I'll wait until it  is finalized and released before I judge it. 


Quoting LauraKW:

You know this is being taken entirely out of context to inflame people, right? And it's working.

Quoting fireangel5:

That is completely ridiculous. Why shouldn't soldiers of any faith be able to be blessed, pray with others of their faith, receive communion, go to confession, etc? Why should a soldier not be able to talk with another religious person about their faith? How are religious members sharing a prayer or mass bothering others? I can understand saying you can't try to talk to non religious or those who don't want to hear about your faith, but to keep people from practicing their faith 



LauraKW
by "Dude!" on May. 1, 2013 at 9:17 PM
The military needs chaplains. All faiths and even those of no faith need guidance and support. The clergy aren't leaving the military. This article is smoke and mirrors based on about two lines of fact. I would be one of the first in line to protest if any branch of the US Armed Forces tried to limit personal religious expression.

Quoting fireangel5:

I'm hoping wording will be very very specific and not include ridding the military of clergy and all of the restrictions mentioned in  the article. But you're right. I'll wait until it  is finalized and released before I judge it. 



Quoting LauraKW:

You know this is being taken entirely out of context to inflame people, right? And it's working.



Quoting fireangel5:

That is completely ridiculous. Why shouldn't soldiers of any faith be able to be blessed, pray with others of their faith, receive communion, go to confession, etc? Why should a soldier not be able to talk with another religious person about their faith? How are religious members sharing a prayer or mass bothering others? I can understand saying you can't try to talk to non religious or those who don't want to hear about your faith, but to keep people from practicing their faith 




..MoonShine..
by Redwood Witch on May. 1, 2013 at 9:35 PM
Yes. I agree.

Quoting Mommy_of_Riley:

The article is seriously over dramatic...



They are speaking of constant proselytizing & harassment not just "sharing" your faith...
TCgirlatheart
by TC on May. 1, 2013 at 10:05 PM
You're welcome. I originally saw it on a news show, but I can't remember which one.

Quoting fireangel5:

Wow, that'  the first I've heard of this. My son had applied to the USAFA several months ago. We never heard about these accusations or the rape for that matter. Thanks for posting those articles. 



Quoting TCgirlatheart:

Non-Christian Air Force Cadets Cite Harassment

THE NATION

The academy, which has received more than 50 complaints, says it is requiring students to attend a class on religious tolerance.

April 20, 2005|David Kelly | Times Staff Writer

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DENVER — The Air Force Academy, still recovering from rape and sexual harassment scandals, is facing charges that some Christian cadets have bullied and berated Jews and students of other religious backgrounds.



School officials said Tuesday they had received 55 complaints over the last few months and were requiring students -- and eventually all employees -- to attend a course on religious tolerance.



For The Record

Los Angeles Times Tuesday May 03, 2005 Home Edition Main News Part A Page 2 National Desk 1 inches; 45 words Type of Material: Correction

Air Force Academy -- An article in the April 20 Section A on allegations of religious intolerance among cadets at the U.S. Air Force Academy said there had been 55 such complaints over the last few months. The complaints occurred over the last four years.





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"Some complaints had to do with people ... saying bad things about persons of other religions or proselytizing in inappropriate places," said academy spokesman Johnny Whitaker. "There have been cases of maliciousness, mean-spiritedness and attacking or baiting someone over religion."



About 90% of the academy's 4,300 cadets identify themselves as Christians; the school's commandant, Brig. Gen. Johnny A. Weida, describes himself as a born-again Christian.



Mikey Weinstein, an academy graduate and a lawyer in Albuquerque, said that his son Curtis -- a sophomore at the academy -- had been called a "filthy Jew."



"When I visited my son, he told me he wanted us to go off base because he had something to tell me," Weinstein said. "He said, 'They are calling me a ... Jew and that I am responsible for killing Christ.' My son told me that he was going to hit the next one who called him something."



Weinstein, 50, said he wanted Congress to investigate what he said was a pervasive Christian bias at the academy.



"When I was at the academy, there wasn't this institutional notion that if you didn't accept Christ you would burn eternally in hell," he said. "I want the generals to come out and say, 'Yes, we have a systemic problem and we are working to fix it.' "



Air Force officials said they got an inkling of a problem after reading the results of a student survey last May.



Many cadets expressed concern over religious respect and a lack of tolerance. Then "The Passion of the Christ," Mel Gibson's film about the crucifixion, was released. Hundreds of movie posters were pinned up in the academy dining hall advertising the film. Cadets did mass e-mailings urging people to see it.



School leaders denounced the e-mails, saying students should not use government equipment to promote their religion.



At that point, officials began looking into the situation.



"We started getting people coming forward," Whitaker said. "Folks sent e-mails to the chaplain describing events -- none of which were reported when they happened. Many of the complaints have been addressed."



Two years ago, the academy's reputation was tarnished by a scandal in which dozens of female cadets said their complaints about sexual assaults had been ignored.



In response to the complaints of religious intolerance, the Colorado Springs, Colo., campus created the RSVP program, which stands for Respecting the Spiritual Values of all People.



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The cadets are required to attend a 50-minute class; soon all 9,000 employees of the academy will have to take part.



"A lot of this is just insensitivity or ignorance," Whitaker said. "These are people who are going into a very diverse Air Force, where they will have to deal with people of all faiths."



Weinstein called the RSVP program window dressing for a more serious problem.



"It's Jim Crow, it's lipstick on a pig, it's eye candy," he said. "I love the academy, but they are lying when they say this isn't a systemic problem. Do you know how much courage it takes for these kids to come forward?"



The academy is about 60% Protestant and 30% Catholic. Included in the number of Christian cadets are 120 Mormons. There are 44 Jews and a handful of Hindus and Buddhists at the academy, officials said.



Colorado Springs is home to more than 100 evangelical Christian organizations, including Focus on the Family, the International Bible Society and New Life Church, whose pastor, Ted Haggard, heads the National Assn. of Evangelicals.



Tom Minnery, vice president of public policy at Focus on the Family, denounced any acts of bigotry but said it was Christians who were facing discrimination.



"If 90% of cadets identify themselves as Christian, it is common sense that Christianity will be in evidence on the campus," he said. "Christianity is deeply felt and very important to people ... and to suggest that it should be bottled up is nonsense. I think a witch hunt is underway to root out Christian beliefs. To root out what is pervasive in 90% of the group is ridiculous."



http://articles.latimes.com/2005/apr/20/nation/na-academy20



This is the story I was thinking of. Sorry for all the ads, it's c&p with my phone.




jllcali
by Jane on May. 1, 2013 at 11:13 PM
Where is the actual text of the policy? That would have to be reviewed too determine what this obviously biased article is about. Since the military hasn't done away with chaplains or putting religious preference on dogs tags, I am fairly certain the title of the post is inaccurate and misleading.


I am not surprised the military would have to make a policy prohibiting proselytizing. (which I'm sure would apply to all faiths) I saw multiple incidents of harassment of non christians by christians when I was in the Army. Granted, they were not everyday occurences for the most part, but just like with sexual harassment, a few bad apples spoil the bunch.

Just to give some examples of behavior I saw that I believe this policy (if there is one) would cover-

A leader telling a soldier "if you don't lose weight, your fat ass is going to hell. And you're fat because you're lazy, so you're going to hell for that too"

A leader telling single soldiers they were going to hell if they had sex. The same leader telling married soldiers they were going to hell if they engaged in oral/anal sex.

A leader telling Jewish soldiers "you're going to hell because you're wrong"

These examples all happened during the duty day, in uniform.


paknari
by on May. 1, 2013 at 11:20 PM
1 mom liked this
Although I fully agree that the military as an organization should be meutral, you do not check your rights at the door when you join. Itit should be able to practice whatever religion you like. I don't think you should be trying to convert people but that can easily be turned into you can't have religion. Less is more in the regulations regarding personal freedom.


Quoting lga1965:

 Oh geeee. The FRC is always having a hissy fit and screaming "Stop picking on us perfect Christians!"


The Armed Forces are supposed to be neutral.Not a big surprise. The Base Chaplain or Post Chaplains of course preach in church....but I see no reason for members of a branch of service to run around speaking of their religions. It does sound like they are trying to recruit.


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jllcali
by Jane on May. 1, 2013 at 11:23 PM
I would have shared examples of non christians harassing christians (in the military), but I didn't see any. Unless you count a non religious person telling a christian "more people would probably go to church if they didn't have to wake up so early." Which is possibly a valid point
Della529
by Matlock on May. 1, 2013 at 11:53 PM

What spin *rolls eyes*

cammibear
by Gold Member on May. 2, 2013 at 12:18 AM
If this is true, so much for freedom of religion.

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