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Crazy Christians think they are persecuted

 

Persecution of Christians on rise – in U.S.

'It is dramatic, I have never seen levels of attacks like these'

 

The joint report by Texas-based Liberty Institute and Washington-based Family Research Council says groups like the American Civil Liberties Union aren’t the only culprits. The report says government agencies around the U.S. are trying to push Christian expression out the door.

“It is dramatic,” says Liberty Institute Founder Kelly Shackleford, of the recent hike in reported incidents of persecution. “I have been doing these types of cases for almost 25 years now. I have never seen the levels of attacks like these and how quickly they are now proliferating.”

Shackleford says government, from schools to social programs, is the ringleader.

“There are children being prohibited from writing Merry Christmas to the soldiers, senior citizens being banned from praying over their meals in the Senior Center, the VA banning the mention of God in military funerals, numerous attempts to have veterans memorials torn down if they have any religious symbols such as a cross, and I could go on and on,” Shackleford said.

 

WND reported in August 2011 on the Houston, Texas, veterans’ cemetery director who issued an order banning God from military or veteran funerals at the facility.

A pastor and family members of deceased veterans eventually filed a federal lawsuit alleging that the Houston National VA Cemetery is discriminating against their religious freedoms.

The suit alleges that cemetery administrator Arleen Ocasio required pastor Scott Rainey to edit a Memorial Day prayer so that the prayer was “general, and its fundamental purpose [was] nondenominational in nature.”

Christian civil rights organization ACLJ senior counsel David French says the exact rate of increase is hard to determine, but many of the new cases come from colleges.

“Our knowledge of incidents is only as good as the reporting,” French says. “However, it’s clear that – particularly on college and university campuses – we have seen a significant rise in attempts to silence Christian organizations by the misapplication of nondiscrimination laws.”

French adds that many public facilities are also covering over Christianity.

“One of the most strident examples: the misuse of the Establishment Clause to attempt to ban any mention of God from historical markers, monuments or even museum exhibits,” French says. “This represents an effort to whitewash God from American history and change our national identity.”

WND reported in February that the city of New York was attempting to cancel the leases of all church and religious groups renting city facilities.

“Our view is that public school buildings, which are funded by taxpayers’ dollars, should not be used as houses of worship,” said Marge Feinberg, spokeswoman for New York City’s Department of Education. “Public school space cannot and should not be used for worship services, especially because school space is not equally available to all faiths.”

Shackleford says the attacks are becoming violent, too.

“The recent attacks on the faith-based Family Research Council and the attack on the Sikhs are recent examples alone,” Shackleford says.

He also cites an example of a city trying to push out its Jewish residents.

“In one case I was involved in, a city literally tried to zone out Orthodox Jews from the city. An official city meeting perpetrated this,” Shackleford says. “Some said, ‘Hitler should have finished the job.’”

Shackleford claims the acts of persecution point to a deeply rooted spiritual issue.

“Religious hostility is the red light on the dashboard that tells us we have a problem and that violence will come next if not fixed,” Shackleford says.

French says although the Obama administration has contributed to the problem, the problem didn’t begin in 2008.

“While the Obama administration launched its own unprecedented assault on religious liberty through Obamacare,” French says, “the attack on Christian expression is the result of cultural changes that have been taking place for decades.”

Shackleford agrees.

“The Obama administration has been very hostile, from the HHS mandates to the VA case to many, many more; but it has been getting worse and worse each administration,” Shackleford says. “Government always tries to increase its power, and freedom has been fading in the process. It has been a steady and consistent.”

French says the current crisis has been brewing for decades.

“No, the trend began with advent of the sexual revolution and the mainstreaming of the 1960s counterculture,” French claims. “As leftist radicals have progressed through the academy, media, churches and government, the trend has only accelerated.”

Shackleford adds that some key court cases may have accelerated the trend.

“The seeds for these attacks were dropped in a Supreme Court opinions in the ’40s, and it really began to take off in the 1960s. The thing that is shocking now, and different, is that the attacks have dramatically picked up speed,” Shackleford says. “There can be as many as 100 new attacks in a month. While Liberty Institute has the highest win rate of any group in the country at over 99 percent, we just can’t currently cover all these with our current resources.”

Among the violations listed in the joint report:

  • A federal judge threatened “incarceration” to a high school valedictorian unless she removed references to Jesus from her graduation speech.
  • City officials prohibited senior citizens from praying over their meals, listening to religious messages or singing gospel songs at a senior activities center.
  • A public school official physically lifted an elementary school student from his seat and reprimanded him in front of his classmates for praying over his lunch.
  • Following U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs’ policies, a federal government official sought to censor a pastor’s prayer, eliminating references to Jesus, during a Memorial Day ceremony honoring veterans at a national cemetery.
  • Public school officials prohibited students from handing out gifts because they contained religious messages.
  • A public school official prevented a student from handing out flyers inviting her classmates to an event at her church.
  • A public university’s law school banned a Christian organization because it required its officers to adhere to a statement of faith that the university disagreed with.
  • The U.S. Department of Justice argued before the Supreme Court that the federal government can tell churches and synagogues which pastors and rabbis it can hire and fire.
  • The State of Texas sought to approve and regulate what religious seminaries can teach.
  • Through the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, the federal government is forcing religious organizations to provide insurance for birth control and abortion-inducing drugs in direct violation of their religious beliefs.
  • The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs banned the mention of God from veterans’ funerals, overriding the wishes of the deceased’s families.
  • A federal judge held that prayers before a state House of Representatives could be to Allah but not to Jesus.


Read more at http://www.wnd.com/2012/09/persecution-of-christians-on-rise-in-u-s/#0ThPaszXS7mkCihI.99

by on May. 6, 2013 at 3:06 AM
Replies (41-50):
lga1965
by on May. 6, 2013 at 8:24 AM
1 mom liked this
How else would she learn from books written from a Christian point of view ? Many people home school to promote a Christian only type of education. I have no idea what you mean....do you homeschool? I am really getting sick of being criticized for having an opinion. Isn't this A Discussion Forum ?

Quoting Raintree:

Knock it off with the home schooling generalization, Iga.

Yes, Poodles uses the sort of books you describe below.

Some of us choose better.

Quoting lga1965:

 Sorry but you are imagining that history books taught that America is a Christian nation....unless you wer homeschooled and your Mom used Christian history books, Talk about being biased and believing in fairy tales. In the USA there are many different religions and to say theirs don't count because it is a "christian nation" is unfair and prejudicial.Even some of the "founding fathers" were Deists and had other beliefs.They never designated a national religion.


Quoting toomanypoodles:


 


Quoting punky3175:

No it wasn't a Christian nation.


Quoting mamalynnsmith:


this was a Christian nation . we Christian's need to stand up and stand together and fight. we need to fight for our Christian rights just like these other groups .




 Show me some evidence to back your claim, please.  The history books I grew up with sure taught that. 


 


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
IhartU
by Gold Member on May. 6, 2013 at 8:26 AM
1 mom liked this

 

Quoting toomanypoodles:

 

Quoting punky3175:

No it wasn't a Christian nation.

Quoting mamalynnsmith:

this was a Christian nation . we Christian's need to stand up and stand together and fight. we need to fight for our Christian rights just like these other groups .

 

 Show me some evidence to back your claim, please.  The history books I grew up with sure taught that. 

 The primary leaders of the so-called founding fathers of our nation were not Bible-believing Christians; they were deists. Deism was a philosophical belief that was widely accepted by the colonial intelligentsia at the time of the American Revolution. Its major tenets included belief in human reason as a reliable means of solving social and political problems and belief in a supreme deity who created the universe to operate solely by natural laws. The supreme God of the Deists removed himself entirely from the universe after creating it. They believed that he assumed no control over it, exerted no influence on natural phenomena, and gave no supernatural revelation to man. A necessary consequence of these beliefs was a rejection of many doctrines central to the Christian religion. Deists did not believe in the virgin birth, divinity, or resurrection of Jesus, the efficacy of prayer, the miracles of the Bible, or even the divine inspiration of the Bible.

 

Some Christians were of course involved in the shaping of our nation, but their influence was minor compared to the ideological contributions of the Deists who pressed for the formation of a secular nation.

 The document that was finally approved at the constitutional convention mentioned religion only once, and that was in Article VI, Section 3, which stated that "no religious test shall ever be required as a qualification to any office or public trust under the United States." Now if the delegates at the convention had truly intended to establish a "Christian nation," why would they have put a statement like this in the constitution and nowhere else even refer to religion? Common sense is enough to convince any reasonable person that if the intention of these men had really been the formation of a "Christian nation," the constitution they wrote would have surely made several references to God, the Bible, Jesus, and other accouterments of the Christian religion, and rather than expressly forbidding ANY religious test as a condition for holding public office in the new nation, it would have stipulated that allegiance to Christianity was a requirement for public office.

 

Clearly, the founders of our nation intended government to maintain a neutral posture in matters of religion. Anyone who would still insist that the intention of the founding fathers was to establish a Christian nation should review a document written during the administration of George Washington. Article 11 of the Treaty with Tripoli declared in part that "the government of the United States is not in any sense founded on the Christian religion..." (Treaties and Other International Acts of the United States, ed. Hunter Miller, Vol. 2, U. S. Government Printing Office, 1931, p. 365). This treaty was negotiated by the American diplomat Joel Barlow during the administration of George Washington. Washington read it and approved it, although it was not ratified by the senate until John Adams had become president. When Adams signed it, he added this statement to his signature "Now, be it known, that I, John Adams, President of the United States of America, having seen and considered the said treaty, do, by and within the consent of the Senate, accept, ratify and confirm the same, and every clause and article thereof." This document and the approval that it received from our nation's first and second presidents and the U. S. Senate as constituted in 1797 do very little to support the popular notion that the founding fathers established our country as a "Christian nation."

 

 As for the religious beliefs of the general population in pre and post revolutionary times, it wasn't nearly as Christian as most people think. Lynn R. Buzzard, executive director of the Christian Legal Society (a national organization of Christian lawyers) has admitted that there is little proof to support the claim that the colonial population was overwhelmingly Christian. "Not only were a good many of the revolutionary leaders more deist than Christian," Buzzard wrote, "but the actual number of church members was rather small. Perhaps as few as five percent of the populace were church members in 1776" (Schools They Haven't Got a Prayer, Elgin, Illinois David C. Cook Publishing, 1982, p. 81). Historian Richard Hofstadter says that "perhaps as many as ninety percent of the Americans were unchurched in 1790" (Anti-Intellectualism in American Life, New York Alfred A. Knopf, 1974, p. 82) and goes on to say that "mid-eighteenth century America had a smaller proportion of church members than any other nation in Christendom," noting that "in 1800 [only] about one of every fifteen Americans was a church member" (p. 89). Historian James MacGregor Burns agrees with these figures, noting that "(t)here had been a `very wintry season' for religion every where in America after the Revolution" (The American Experiment Vineyard of Liberty, New York Vintage Books, 1983, p. 493). He adds that "ninety percent of the people lay outside the churches."

http://www.infidels.org/library/modern/farrell_till/myth.html

talia-mom
by Gold Member on May. 6, 2013 at 8:27 AM
1 mom liked this

You don't get to offer your opinion without criticism when people find it wrong or ugly.   If you can't handle that then keep your opinion to yourself.  Your constant whining about how people don't let you give your opinion gets old.


Quoting lga1965:

How else would she learn from books written from a Christian point of view ? Many people home school to promote a Christian only type of education. I have no idea what you mean....do you homeschool? I am really getting sick of being criticized for having an opinion. Isn't this A Discussion Forum ?

Quoting Raintree:

Knock it off with the home schooling generalization, Iga.

Yes, Poodles uses the sort of books you describe below.

Some of us choose better.

Quoting lga1965:

 Sorry but you are imagining that history books taught that America is a Christian nation....unless you wer homeschooled and your Mom used Christian history books, Talk about being biased and believing in fairy tales. In the USA there are many different religions and to say theirs don't count because it is a "christian nation" is unfair and prejudicial.Even some of the "founding fathers" were Deists and had other beliefs.They never designated a national religion.


Quoting toomanypoodles:


 


Quoting punky3175:

No it wasn't a Christian nation.


Quoting mamalynnsmith:


this was a Christian nation . we Christian's need to stand up and stand together and fight. we need to fight for our Christian rights just like these other groups .




 Show me some evidence to back your claim, please.  The history books I grew up with sure taught that. 


 




candlegal
by Judy on May. 6, 2013 at 8:29 AM

Nope, not a bit

Quoting romalove:


Quoting candlegal:

actually it still is. 

Quoting mamalynnsmith:

this was a Christian nation . we Christian's need to stand up and stand together and fight. we need to fight for our Christian rights just like these other groups .



Are you still having trouble distinguishing between a Christian nation and a secular nation with a majority Chrisitian populace?



romalove
by Roma on May. 6, 2013 at 8:35 AM
7 moms liked this


Quoting candlegal:

Nope, not a bit

Quoting romalove:


Quoting candlegal:

actually it still is. 

Quoting mamalynnsmith:

this was a Christian nation . we Christian's need to stand up and stand together and fight. we need to fight for our Christian rights just like these other groups .



Are you still having trouble distinguishing between a Christian nation and a secular nation with a majority Chrisitian populace?



Then you'd stop posting this idiocy about this being a Christian nation.

It isn't.

Raintree
by Ruby Member on May. 6, 2013 at 8:35 AM
2 moms liked this

Iga, try to remember the things you've said once in awhile.

Yes, I did homeschool for quite awhile to escape- get this- the evangelical/fundamentalist environment being encouraged in my local district. As in- the teachers proselytize in the classroom. In the public school.

You told me you felt bad for my children because I home schooled them. And then you called me paranoid.

NOT ALL HOME SCHOOLERS ARE FUNDAMENTALIST CHRISTIANS.

Some are quite the opposite.

Quoting lga1965:

How else would she learn from books written from a Christian point of view ? Many people home school to promote a Christian only type of education. I have no idea what you mean....do you homeschool? I am really getting sick of being criticized for having an opinion. Isn't this A Discussion Forum ?

Quoting Raintree:

Knock it off with the home schooling generalization, Iga.

Yes, Poodles uses the sort of books you describe below.

Some of us choose better.

Quoting lga1965:

 Sorry but you are imagining that history books taught that America is a Christian nation....unless you wer homeschooled and your Mom used Christian history books, Talk about being biased and believing in fairy tales. In the USA there are many different religions and to say theirs don't count because it is a "christian nation" is unfair and prejudicial.Even some of the "founding fathers" were Deists and had other beliefs.They never designated a national religion.


Quoting toomanypoodles:


 


Quoting punky3175:

No it wasn't a Christian nation.


Quoting mamalynnsmith:


this was a Christian nation . we Christian's need to stand up and stand together and fight. we need to fight for our Christian rights just like these other groups .




 Show me some evidence to back your claim, please.  The history books I grew up with sure taught that. 


 



elzingah36
by Member on May. 6, 2013 at 8:36 AM
1 mom liked this
Your absolutely correct. It wasn't a Christian nation....it was a free nation.

Quoting punky3175:

No it wasn't a Christian nation.



Quoting mamalynnsmith:

this was a Christian nation . we Christian's need to stand up and stand together and fight. we need to fight for our Christian rights just like these other groups .


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
-Celestial-
by Pepperlynn on May. 6, 2013 at 8:37 AM
8 moms liked this

Bookwormy
by Platinum Member on May. 6, 2013 at 8:37 AM
This is an uneducated opinion, given with absolutely no proof. Others with an opposing correct opinion have provided evidence. Not one person with this uneducated opinion has provided any evidence because there isn't any. If you have any, please provide it now. Otherwise,

Good Day!


Quoting candlegal:

Nope, not a bit

Quoting romalove:


Quoting candlegal:

actually it still is. 

Quoting mamalynnsmith:

this was a Christian nation . we Christian's need to stand up and stand together and fight. we need to fight for our Christian rights just like these other groups .



Are you still having trouble distinguishing between a Christian nation and a secular nation with a majority Chrisitian populace?




Aamy
by Silver Member on May. 6, 2013 at 8:40 AM
1 mom liked this
Lmao, our founding fathers did NOT base our nation on Christianity. They where freemasons. And with such a diverse mixing pot no we do not need Christianity in our government. At all.

Quoting toomanypoodles:

 


Quoting punky3175:

No it wasn't a Christian nation.


Quoting mamalynnsmith:


this was a Christian nation . we Christian's need to stand up and stand together and fight. we need to fight for our Christian rights just like these other groups .


 


 Show me some evidence to back your claim, please.  The history books I grew up with sure taught that. 

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