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SCARY FACT: 3 Out Of 4 Fast Food Workers Have-

 

-been forced to work while sick AND never gotten a raise. Can you imagine living like that? Learn more from the charts below. Then get angry.

 

 

 

-been forced to work while sick AND never gotten a raise. Can you imagine living like that? Learn more from the charts below. Then get angry.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

by on May. 6, 2013 at 1:11 PM
Replies (71-80):
LindaClement
by Linda on May. 7, 2013 at 6:53 PM
1 mom liked this

A LITTLE overdramatic.

Not having paid sick days is not 'forcing' anything. You don't get paid when you don't work. That's actually how it works for doctors and 100% of the self-employed. Weird.

4/4 of restaurant workers are working in an industry that doesn't price in inflation --so if y'all want your $2.99 all you can eat hog-down, don't expect your cook to get a raise anytime in the next 17 years.

I don't expect minimum wage (read: ENTRY-LEVEL) workers to be able to afford to feed a family of 4 anymore than I expect them to be able to afford to live on their own. Roommates, anyone? No? Fine... whatever. Got experience? Why are you still working entry-level?

cjsbmom
by Lois Lane on May. 7, 2013 at 7:02 PM
1 mom liked this

I hadn't thought about that. Good point. As a contractor, I don't get paid sick days or paid vacation. When I take time off work, I lose money. 

Quoting LindaClement:

A LITTLE overdramatic.

Not having paid sick days is not 'forcing' anything. You don't get paid when you don't work. That's actually how it works for doctors and 100% of the self-employed. Weird.

4/4 of restaurant workers are working in an industry that doesn't price in inflation --so if y'all want your $2.99 all you can eat hog-down, don't expect your cook to get a raise anytime in the next 17 years.

I don't expect minimum wage (read: ENTRY-LEVEL) workers to be able to afford to feed a family of 4 anymore than I expect them to be able to afford to live on their own. Roommates, anyone? No? Fine... whatever. Got experience? Why are you still working entry-level?


SewingMamaLele
by Leanne on May. 7, 2013 at 7:14 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting GLWerth:

Not only are these workers expected to be there, on time, despite any health issues they have, they are expected to give top notch customer service and be endlessly cheerful no matter what.

And then, they are expected to smile as others treat them like the dirt beneath their feet in order to feel better about themselves.

I got a wrong order at a coffee place a few weeks ago. I went in to get the right one and the worker was cringing when I said I got the wrong order. Apparently the other person whose drink was wrong decided that a mistake demanded a screaming temper tantrum instead of a smile and "Hey, can you fix this please?".

The fact is, some people ARE good at these kind of jobs. Some enjoy them. Why should these not be a viable job path? We will always need service sector workers, why not treat them like human beings and pay them a living wage. Not CEO salaries, but a wage a person can live on.  

because if companies paid baristas $20/hour, you'd have to pay a LOT more for your lattes.   there is upward motion in those companies, and people do move up...but they move up to jobs that warrant higher salaries.   one of my best friends husband works for peets coffee and supports his family  5 on his very comfortable salary.    those who are good move up, those who aren't move on.   if you're still making minimum wage at 30 (save high end waiters, hairdressers, etc...), then you're doing something wrong.  heck, at age 19 i was the highest paid hostess at chili's because they didn't want to lose me.    i was worth the extra money to the business, so they paid it.   

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GLWerth
by Gina on May. 7, 2013 at 10:01 PM

 


Quoting SewingMamaLele:


Quoting GLWerth:

Not only are these workers expected to be there, on time, despite any health issues they have, they are expected to give top notch customer service and be endlessly cheerful no matter what.

And then, they are expected to smile as others treat them like the dirt beneath their feet in order to feel better about themselves.

I got a wrong order at a coffee place a few weeks ago. I went in to get the right one and the worker was cringing when I said I got the wrong order. Apparently the other person whose drink was wrong decided that a mistake demanded a screaming temper tantrum instead of a smile and "Hey, can you fix this please?".

The fact is, some people ARE good at these kind of jobs. Some enjoy them. Why should these not be a viable job path? We will always need service sector workers, why not treat them like human beings and pay them a living wage. Not CEO salaries, but a wage a person can live on.  

because if companies paid baristas $20/hour, you'd have to pay a LOT more for your lattes.   there is upward motion in those companies, and people do move up...but they move up to jobs that warrant higher salaries.   one of my best friends husband works for peets coffee and supports his family  5 on his very comfortable salary.    those who are good move up, those who aren't move on.   if you're still making minimum wage at 30 (save high end waiters, hairdressers, etc...), then you're doing something wrong.  heck, at age 19 i was the highest paid hostess at chili's because they didn't want to lose me.    i was worth the extra money to the business, so they paid it.   

Other countries manage to pay their workers a living wage and the businesses still make a profit.

 

SewingMamaLele
by Leanne on May. 7, 2013 at 10:37 PM


Quoting GLWerth:



Quoting SewingMamaLele:


Quoting GLWerth:

Not only are these workers expected to be there, on time, despite any health issues they have, they are expected to give top notch customer service and be endlessly cheerful no matter what.

And then, they are expected to smile as others treat them like the dirt beneath their feet in order to feel better about themselves.

I got a wrong order at a coffee place a few weeks ago. I went in to get the right one and the worker was cringing when I said I got the wrong order. Apparently the other person whose drink was wrong decided that a mistake demanded a screaming temper tantrum instead of a smile and "Hey, can you fix this please?".

The fact is, some people ARE good at these kind of jobs. Some enjoy them. Why should these not be a viable job path? We will always need service sector workers, why not treat them like human beings and pay them a living wage. Not CEO salaries, but a wage a person can live on.  

because if companies paid baristas $20/hour, you'd have to pay a LOT more for your lattes.   there is upward motion in those companies, and people do move up...but they move up to jobs that warrant higher salaries.   one of my best friends husband works for peets coffee and supports his family  5 on his very comfortable salary.    those who are good move up, those who aren't move on.   if you're still making minimum wage at 30 (save high end waiters, hairdressers, etc...), then you're doing something wrong.  heck, at age 19 i was the highest paid hostess at chili's because they didn't want to lose me.    i was worth the extra money to the business, so they paid it.   

Other countries manage to pay their workers a living wage and the businesses still make a profit.


examples?  

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Debmomto2girls
by Debbie on May. 7, 2013 at 11:27 PM
I am adjunct at a univeristy. Great pay but I do not get paid for sick days.

Quoting cjsbmom:

I hadn't thought about that. Good point. As a contractor, I don't get paid sick days or paid vacation. When I take time off work, I lose money. 

Quoting LindaClement:

A LITTLE overdramatic.

Not having paid sick days is not 'forcing' anything. You don't get paid when you don't work. That's actually how it works for doctors and 100% of the self-employed. Weird.

4/4 of restaurant workers are working in an industry that doesn't price in inflation --so if y'all want your $2.99 all you can eat hog-down, don't expect your cook to get a raise anytime in the next 17 years.

I don't expect minimum wage (read: ENTRY-LEVEL) workers to be able to afford to feed a family of 4 anymore than I expect them to be able to afford to live on their own. Roommates, anyone? No? Fine... whatever. Got experience? Why are you still working entry-level?


GLWerth
by Gina on May. 7, 2013 at 11:42 PM

My DH travels internationally for work. He talks to the people he sees everywhere, including servers. 

Germany: professional, often older waiters and waitresses.

Australia: cab driver said no tipping because he's a professional doing his job, which earns him a good wage.

Spain: you don't tip because people earn a living wage in most places.

Dubai: no tips, even to the woman (she was there to escort him through the airport, through customs to his driver) who stood for two hours as the customs people were trying to shake him down and refused a tip for the time she spent.

Bangkok: Tour Guide asked why he would tip her when he already paid her.  

Overall, most places he travelled, people were paid wages that allowed them to live in their societies and not in abject poverty.

 

Quoting SewingMamaLele:


Quoting GLWerth:

 

 

Quoting SewingMamaLele:


Quoting GLWerth:

Not only are these workers expected to be there, on time, despite any health issues they have, they are expected to give top notch customer service and be endlessly cheerful no matter what.

And then, they are expected to smile as others treat them like the dirt beneath their feet in order to feel better about themselves.

I got a wrong order at a coffee place a few weeks ago. I went in to get the right one and the worker was cringing when I said I got the wrong order. Apparently the other person whose drink was wrong decided that a mistake demanded a screaming temper tantrum instead of a smile and "Hey, can you fix this please?".

The fact is, some people ARE good at these kind of jobs. Some enjoy them. Why should these not be a viable job path? We will always need service sector workers, why not treat them like human beings and pay them a living wage. Not CEO salaries, but a wage a person can live on.  

because if companies paid baristas $20/hour, you'd have to pay a LOT more for your lattes.   there is upward motion in those companies, and people do move up...but they move up to jobs that warrant higher salaries.   one of my best friends husband works for peets coffee and supports his family  5 on his very comfortable salary.    those who are good move up, those who aren't move on.   if you're still making minimum wage at 30 (save high end waiters, hairdressers, etc...), then you're doing something wrong.  heck, at age 19 i was the highest paid hostess at chili's because they didn't want to lose me.    i was worth the extra money to the business, so they paid it.   

Other countries manage to pay their workers a living wage and the businesses still make a profit.

 

examples?  

 

 

LucyMom08
by Gold Member on May. 7, 2013 at 11:51 PM
It wasn't a difficult question...

Quoting Carpy:

Google is your friend, there are all kinds of sources on it.



Quoting LucyMom08:

Can you please elaborate?





Quoting Carpy:

Look up the regulations







Quoting LucyMom08:

Can you elaborate on this please?









Quoting Carpy:

But the bleeding heart liberals decided kids should not have these jobs.  It is a burden to employ them with all the regulations.  Not good for kids who want summer or after school jobs.

Quoting LntLckrsCmQut:

In a perfect world, fast food jobs would be a job for a teenager.





This is also one of the many reasons we don't eat fast food.


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
SewingMamaLele
by Leanne on May. 8, 2013 at 12:15 AM

just to take one example... every system has it's kinks, benefits and drawbacks.... Australia.  according to limited Google research (reliable, i know!), some of the issues include a high un/under employment rate... higher costs for most goods and services and the fact that many restaurants and retail stores are closed evenings and weekends because they can't afford to stay open.   that's the main concern with higher min wage... less jobs for lower skilled workers and higher costs for everyone.  


Quoting GLWerth:

My DH travels internationally for work. He talks to the people he sees everywhere, including servers. 

Germany: professional, often older waiters and waitresses.

Australia: cab driver said no tipping because he's a professional doing his job, which earns him a good wage.

Spain: you don't tip because people earn a living wage in most places.

Dubai: no tips, even to the woman (she was there to escort him through the airport, through customs to his driver) who stood for two hours as the customs people were trying to shake him down and refused a tip for the time she spent.

Bangkok: Tour Guide asked why he would tip her when he already paid her.  

Overall, most places he travelled, people were paid wages that allowed them to live in their societies and not in abject poverty.


Quoting SewingMamaLele:


Quoting GLWerth:



Quoting SewingMamaLele:


Quoting GLWerth:

Not only are these workers expected to be there, on time, despite any health issues they have, they are expected to give top notch customer service and be endlessly cheerful no matter what.

And then, they are expected to smile as others treat them like the dirt beneath their feet in order to feel better about themselves.

I got a wrong order at a coffee place a few weeks ago. I went in to get the right one and the worker was cringing when I said I got the wrong order. Apparently the other person whose drink was wrong decided that a mistake demanded a screaming temper tantrum instead of a smile and "Hey, can you fix this please?".

The fact is, some people ARE good at these kind of jobs. Some enjoy them. Why should these not be a viable job path? We will always need service sector workers, why not treat them like human beings and pay them a living wage. Not CEO salaries, but a wage a person can live on.  

because if companies paid baristas $20/hour, you'd have to pay a LOT more for your lattes.   there is upward motion in those companies, and people do move up...but they move up to jobs that warrant higher salaries.   one of my best friends husband works for peets coffee and supports his family  5 on his very comfortable salary.    those who are good move up, those who aren't move on.   if you're still making minimum wage at 30 (save high end waiters, hairdressers, etc...), then you're doing something wrong.  heck, at age 19 i was the highest paid hostess at chili's because they didn't want to lose me.    i was worth the extra money to the business, so they paid it.   

Other countries manage to pay their workers a living wage and the businesses still make a profit.


examples?  




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Carpy
by Ruby Member on May. 8, 2013 at 5:14 AM

You are correct, but it wasn't a difficult research project either.

Quoting LucyMom08:

It wasn't a difficult question...

Quoting Carpy:

Google is your friend, there are all kinds of sources on it.



Quoting LucyMom08:

Can you please elaborate?





Quoting Carpy:

Look up the regulations







Quoting LucyMom08:

Can you elaborate on this please?









Quoting Carpy:

But the bleeding heart liberals decided kids should not have these jobs.  It is a burden to employ them with all the regulations.  Not good for kids who want summer or after school jobs.

Quoting LntLckrsCmQut:

In a perfect world, fast food jobs would be a job for a teenager.





This is also one of the many reasons we don't eat fast food.



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