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Councilwoman lectures high school students over offensive black stick figure

Posted by on May. 6, 2013 at 4:12 PM
  • 63 Replies


Councilwoman lectures high school students over offensive black stick figure

offensive quilt virginia

High school students in Virginia just wanted to celebrate their city with a quilt, but their presentation ended in controversy when a City Councilwoman was so offended by a black stick figure on the quilt that she tried to block it from public display.

High school juniors at Piedmont Governor's School in Martinsville each made a panel for a quilt project as a celebration of what they learned about the region and local government.

The sixteen students each took turns explaining panels, one depicting street lamps in appreciation of how the city serves its people. But one panel stopped the whole presentation.

"We got to walk across the Philpott Dam and the small black person represents us before we learned all the information," explained a female student, "and then the bigger gold person is how he feels after he's been enriched with all the different knowledge."

Councilwoman Sharon Brooks-Hodge seized on the small panel in the bottom-left, interrupting the student.

"Excuse me. Um, why is the small black person the negative image?" asked Brooks-Hodge.

As Brooks-Hodge continued criticizing the quilt panel, the girl explaining the panel started to cry.

Stick figure on quilt called racist

"This isn't the girl who did the panel, and now this City Councilwoman is making this sixteen-year-old girl defend something that is purely based on the Councilwoman's insanity," said Dori.

The male student that created the panel explained that he didn't mean the black stick figure to depict race.

"I was just doing a dark color and a bright color," he said.

Brooks-Hodge continued to challenge him, saying that the black color offended her "as a person who is of dark color." When he asked what color he should have used, she said it didn't matter - as long as it wasn't black.

"Whoever reviewed that to make a small black person the before and the gold which you are afterwards, considering you only talked to 10 percent of black people in a city that's 45 percent African-American, I take offense to that and I hope that you do not display that," Brooks-Hodge said.

The class had planned to hang the quilt at a municipal building, but Brooks-Hodge demanded that it not be shown publicly.

The local chapter of the NAACP later sent a letter to the City Council in support of Brooks-Hodge, saying "This young man had not received training on how offensive depictions like this were to people of color. If he had, this incident could have been avoided."

Dori says that the Councilwoman's reaction spoiled what could have been an incredible learning opportunity.

"Here's what we've learned: these kids, they try to do something nice for the city, for their government, and they're greeted by the insanity of political correctness," said Dori.

by on May. 6, 2013 at 4:12 PM
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Replies (1-10):
GotSomeKids
by Silver Member on May. 6, 2013 at 4:17 PM


SuperChicken
by on May. 6, 2013 at 4:18 PM
1 mom liked this

eye rolling

finnbar
by Bronze Member on May. 6, 2013 at 4:34 PM
2 moms liked this
Really? A kid should have received training in appropriate stick figure drawing?
Healthystart30
by Silver Member on May. 6, 2013 at 4:45 PM
Why did she attack the children? Nut case! She should have waited and then addressed this with the adults! Not made some 16 year olds cry!

parentalrights1
by on May. 6, 2013 at 4:55 PM
1 mom liked this
Maybe he should have used dark brown instead

She said anything other than black lol
GotSomeKids
by Silver Member on May. 6, 2013 at 5:05 PM

This is what I don't understand.  In a day and age where we teach children to see past color, but we still have adults assigning color to EVERYTHING.  That said, I think it was sad that she couldn't see past her own vision and LISTEN to what the children were trying to convey with the picture.

Edit:  Ironically, she said she wouldn't have a problem with the stick figure being white.  So, it's okay potentially offend a white person, but not a black person.  I could be wrong, but that is the way I interpret what she is saying.  I find it rather hypocritical.


Quoting Healthystart30:

Why did she attack the children? Nut case! She should have waited and then addressed this with the adults! Not made some 16 year olds cry!


Fjamrkr
by on May. 6, 2013 at 5:13 PM
4 moms liked this
Black people are some of the most color sensitive people I've ever met. Just because something is a dark color doesn't mean it's depicting an African American.
If you see it that way, that's your own racism and you need to deal with it on your own..
Tag3.0
by on May. 6, 2013 at 5:46 PM
1 mom liked this



Quoting Fjamrkr:

Black people are some of the most color sensitive people I've ever met. Just because something is a dark color doesn't mean it's depicting an African American.
If you see it that way, that's your own racism and you need to deal with it on your own..


Make blanket statements much? 

Please look up the definition of racism before you use the word.

Fjamrkr
by on May. 6, 2013 at 5:56 PM
3 moms liked this
"a belief or doctrine that inherent differences among the various human races determine cultural or individual achievement, usually involving the idea that one's own race is superior and has the right to rule others."

Here in the south, you run into all kinds of blacks with this mindset exactly. Either they see whites as klansmen trying to oppress them or they talk down to you like they're above you because their ancestors went through a lot to get them the freedoms they take for granted now.
When's the last time you heard a white person in the news complain that somebody offended them by using a color?
It is imagined racism on her part. Whether you like that or not. She got offended by what she saw and what she imagined. Not by what the artist portrayed.


Quoting Tag3.0:




Quoting Fjamrkr:

Black people are some of the most color sensitive people I've ever met. Just because something is a dark color doesn't mean it's depicting an African American.

If you see it that way, that's your own racism and you need to deal with it on your own..



Make blanket statements much? 

Please look up the definition of racism before you use the word.


GotSomeKids
by Silver Member on May. 6, 2013 at 6:46 PM

Not only that, she addressed a student who was not responsible for making the artistic decisions for that particular quilting block.  How could she have possibly answered the question to the city council woman, if she wasn't the one who created the quilting block?  Even worse, it was inappropriate time to address it.  She should have talked with the teacher/parent reps instead of calling out a student in front of everyone.

Quoting Fjamrkr:

"a belief or doctrine that inherent differences among the various human races determine cultural or individual achievement, usually involving the idea that one's own race is superior and has the right to rule others."

Here in the south, you run into all kinds of blacks with this mindset exactly. Either they see whites as klansmen trying to oppress them or they talk down to you like they're above you because their ancestors went through a lot to get them the freedoms they take for granted now.
When's the last time you heard a white person in the news complain that somebody offended them by using a color?
It is imagined racism on her part. Whether you like that or not. She got offended by what she saw and what she imagined. Not by what the artist portrayed.


Quoting Tag3.0:




Quoting Fjamrkr:

Black people are some of the most color sensitive people I've ever met. Just because something is a dark color doesn't mean it's depicting an African American.

If you see it that way, that's your own racism and you need to deal with it on your own..



Make blanket statements much? 

Please look up the definition of racism before you use the word.



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