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Councilwoman lectures high school students over offensive black stick figure

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Councilwoman lectures high school students over offensive black stick figure

offensive quilt virginia

High school students in Virginia just wanted to celebrate their city with a quilt, but their presentation ended in controversy when a City Councilwoman was so offended by a black stick figure on the quilt that she tried to block it from public display.

High school juniors at Piedmont Governor's School in Martinsville each made a panel for a quilt project as a celebration of what they learned about the region and local government.

The sixteen students each took turns explaining panels, one depicting street lamps in appreciation of how the city serves its people. But one panel stopped the whole presentation.

"We got to walk across the Philpott Dam and the small black person represents us before we learned all the information," explained a female student, "and then the bigger gold person is how he feels after he's been enriched with all the different knowledge."

Councilwoman Sharon Brooks-Hodge seized on the small panel in the bottom-left, interrupting the student.

"Excuse me. Um, why is the small black person the negative image?" asked Brooks-Hodge.

As Brooks-Hodge continued criticizing the quilt panel, the girl explaining the panel started to cry.

Stick figure on quilt called racist

"This isn't the girl who did the panel, and now this City Councilwoman is making this sixteen-year-old girl defend something that is purely based on the Councilwoman's insanity," said Dori.

The male student that created the panel explained that he didn't mean the black stick figure to depict race.

"I was just doing a dark color and a bright color," he said.

Brooks-Hodge continued to challenge him, saying that the black color offended her "as a person who is of dark color." When he asked what color he should have used, she said it didn't matter - as long as it wasn't black.

"Whoever reviewed that to make a small black person the before and the gold which you are afterwards, considering you only talked to 10 percent of black people in a city that's 45 percent African-American, I take offense to that and I hope that you do not display that," Brooks-Hodge said.

The class had planned to hang the quilt at a municipal building, but Brooks-Hodge demanded that it not be shown publicly.

The local chapter of the NAACP later sent a letter to the City Council in support of Brooks-Hodge, saying "This young man had not received training on how offensive depictions like this were to people of color. If he had, this incident could have been avoided."

Dori says that the Councilwoman's reaction spoiled what could have been an incredible learning opportunity.

"Here's what we've learned: these kids, they try to do something nice for the city, for their government, and they're greeted by the insanity of political correctness," said Dori.

by on May. 6, 2013 at 4:12 PM
Replies (21-30):
Tag3.0
by on May. 7, 2013 at 10:26 AM

I call everyone sugar, Im from the south. 

I actually believe there was a way to live seperate but equal. Ever heard of black wall street?

Dont assume you know shit about me. I have been called a negro by all races, why the fuck do you think I used the term? It's what people call me. 


Quoting Radarma:

"Sugar" is talking down to someone. And if I called you a negro, you would blow a fucking gasket. Why, because I am white. Since you want to be our spokesperson for people of color, tell me won't cha...ever heard any black folk say they are FOR segregation? I HAVE. Keep it real.
Quoting Tag3.0:





Fjamrkr
by on May. 7, 2013 at 11:59 AM
I didn't say that anyone spoke of klansmen. If you had bothered to read, you would have seen that I said in situations like this, where racism is inserted rather than intended, it seems that blacks tend treat whites as if they were klansmen trying to oppress black people. Its a simile. Not a literal phrase. While there are some whites who are still in that mindset, they're not all that way.
I never said ALL blacks act this way. Or think this way. I said some tend see racism where there really wasn't any.
What she did WAS racism. By seeing a color and assuming that it meant someone like her was less than. She didn't infer that blacks were superior; her reaction showed that she thinks whites perceive themselves as superior. She saw racism where there was no racism. That, to me, is racism in an of itself.


Quoting Tag3.0:

Im from the south sugar, born and raised. Im also black and am familiar with the south's history of racisim. The fact that segregated proms still exist shows the south has alot of growing up to do. 

You know what is fuinny, that woman never mentioned anything about klansman in her statement, yet here you are speaking for her. I find that alot of people like to do that for blacks, put words in their mouths as if they know how we all think and act. Fuck, Im black and I dont know how all blacks think. Her personal experiences may have led her to draw that conclusion. Shes older than me and Im in my late 20's. Ive been called all kinds of names by the glorious racist whites of the south. Some of them even had your atrocious mindset and assumed all us "coloreds" were the same. 

You are doing exactly what you claim this woman is doing. Stop it.

You also gave me the definition of racisim, what this woman did was not racisim. She doesn't think blacks are superior, unless I missed that part in her interview. 

As an educated negro, Iam well aware of those definitions and use the words wisely.




Quoting Fjamrkr:

"a belief or doctrine that inherent differences among the various human races determine cultural or individual achievement, usually involving the idea that one's own race is superior and has the right to rule others."



Here in the south, you run into all kinds of blacks with this mindset exactly. Either they see whites as klansmen trying to oppress them or they talk down to you like they're above you because their ancestors went through a lot to get them the freedoms they take for granted now.

When's the last time you heard a white person in the news complain that somebody offended them by using a color?

It is imagined racism on her part. Whether you like that or not. She got offended by what she saw and what she imagined. Not by what the artist portrayed.







Radarma
by "OneDar" on May. 7, 2013 at 12:07 PM

 There it is.

Thanks for your honesty. Sincerely.

Quoting Tag3.0:

I call everyone sugar, Im from the south. 

I actually believe there was a way to live seperate but equal. Ever heard of black wall street?

Dont assume you know shit about me. I have been called a negro by all races, why the fuck do you think I used the term? It's what people call me. 

 

Quoting Radarma:

"Sugar" is talking down to someone. And if I called you a negro, you would blow a fucking gasket. Why, because I am white. Since you want to be our spokesperson for people of color, tell me won't cha...ever heard any black folk say they are FOR segregation? I HAVE. Keep it real.
Quoting Tag3.0:



 

 

 

Radarma
by "OneDar" on May. 7, 2013 at 12:09 PM

 Nicely said, and glad you are saying it. I am out of juice on this particular topic.

 

Quoting Fjamrkr:

I didn't say that anyone spoke of klansmen. If you had bothered to read, you would have seen that I said in situations like this, where racism is inserted rather than intended, it seems that blacks tend treat whites as if they were klansmen trying to oppress black people. Its a simile. Not a literal phrase. While there are some whites who are still in that mindset, they're not all that way.
I never said ALL blacks act this way. Or think this way. I said some tend see racism where there really wasn't any.
What she did WAS racism. By seeing a color and assuming that it meant someone like her was less than. She didn't infer that blacks were superior; her reaction showed that she thinks whites perceive themselves as superior. She saw racism where there was no racism. That, to me, is racism in an of itself.


Quoting Tag3.0:

Im from the south sugar, born and raised. Im also black and am familiar with the south's history of racisim. The fact that segregated proms still exist shows the south has alot of growing up to do. 

You know what is fuinny, that woman never mentioned anything about klansman in her statement, yet here you are speaking for her. I find that alot of people like to do that for blacks, put words in their mouths as if they know how we all think and act. Fuck, Im black and I dont know how all blacks think. Her personal experiences may have led her to draw that conclusion. Shes older than me and Im in my late 20's. Ive been called all kinds of names by the glorious racist whites of the south. Some of them even had your atrocious mindset and assumed all us "coloreds" were the same. 

You are doing exactly what you claim this woman is doing. Stop it.

You also gave me the definition of racisim, what this woman did was not racisim. She doesn't think blacks are superior, unless I missed that part in her interview. 

As an educated negro, Iam well aware of those definitions and use the words wisely.

 

 


Quoting Fjamrkr:

"a belief or doctrine that inherent differences among the various human races determine cultural or individual achievement, usually involving the idea that one's own race is superior and has the right to rule others."



Here in the south, you run into all kinds of blacks with this mindset exactly. Either they see whites as klansmen trying to oppress them or they talk down to you like they're above you because their ancestors went through a lot to get them the freedoms they take for granted now.

When's the last time you heard a white person in the news complain that somebody offended them by using a color?

It is imagined racism on her part. Whether you like that or not. She got offended by what she saw and what she imagined. Not by what the artist portrayed.







 

ms-superwoman
by Silver Member on May. 7, 2013 at 12:10 PM

I can see where she is coming from and how she feels but I do feel that she overreacted. Interrupting the students presentation was rude. She should have waited until it was over and then ask questions in a respectful manor. Didn't the students already agree to change the color of the ignorant person?

Come join us!

  Butt 'N Gut


Mommy_of_Riley
by Jes on May. 7, 2013 at 12:11 PM
Wow.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
MissTacoBell
by on May. 7, 2013 at 12:14 PM
If it was white, it would offend white people. If it were yellow, Asians; tan, middle eastern/native American.

You can't claim that only your race is free from ridicule.
Billiejeens
by on May. 7, 2013 at 12:19 PM

 

She's a moron, elected by morons.

Quoting GotSomeKids:

This is what I don't understand.  In a day and age where we teach children to see past color, but we still have adults assigning color to EVERYTHING.  That said, I think it was sad that she couldn't see past her own vision and LISTEN to what the children were trying to convey with the picture.

Edit:  Ironically, she said she wouldn't have a problem with the stick figure being white.  So, it's okay potentially offend a white person, but not a black person.  I could be wrong, but that is the way I interpret what she is saying.  I find it rather hypocritical.


Quoting Healthystart30:

Why did she attack the children? Nut case! She should have waited and then addressed this with the adults! Not made some 16 year olds cry!



 

Paigesmommy78
by Bronze Member on May. 7, 2013 at 12:20 PM
This is a sad thing and she said anything other then black but I bet dame well she would have got just as bitchy about it if it was a brow one but really why did she have to call out the kid like that they really didn't do anything
Billiejeens
by on May. 7, 2013 at 12:21 PM

 

You should look it up, I know that you don't know.

Quoting Tag3.0:

 

 

Quoting Fjamrkr:

Black people are some of the most color sensitive people I've ever met. Just because something is a dark color doesn't mean it's depicting an African American.
If you see it that way, that's your own racism and you need to deal with it on your own..

 

Make blanket statements much? 

Please look up the definition of racism before you use the word.


 

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