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Councilwoman lectures high school students over offensive black stick figure

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Councilwoman lectures high school students over offensive black stick figure

offensive quilt virginia

High school students in Virginia just wanted to celebrate their city with a quilt, but their presentation ended in controversy when a City Councilwoman was so offended by a black stick figure on the quilt that she tried to block it from public display.

High school juniors at Piedmont Governor's School in Martinsville each made a panel for a quilt project as a celebration of what they learned about the region and local government.

The sixteen students each took turns explaining panels, one depicting street lamps in appreciation of how the city serves its people. But one panel stopped the whole presentation.

"We got to walk across the Philpott Dam and the small black person represents us before we learned all the information," explained a female student, "and then the bigger gold person is how he feels after he's been enriched with all the different knowledge."

Councilwoman Sharon Brooks-Hodge seized on the small panel in the bottom-left, interrupting the student.

"Excuse me. Um, why is the small black person the negative image?" asked Brooks-Hodge.

As Brooks-Hodge continued criticizing the quilt panel, the girl explaining the panel started to cry.

Stick figure on quilt called racist

"This isn't the girl who did the panel, and now this City Councilwoman is making this sixteen-year-old girl defend something that is purely based on the Councilwoman's insanity," said Dori.

The male student that created the panel explained that he didn't mean the black stick figure to depict race.

"I was just doing a dark color and a bright color," he said.

Brooks-Hodge continued to challenge him, saying that the black color offended her "as a person who is of dark color." When he asked what color he should have used, she said it didn't matter - as long as it wasn't black.

"Whoever reviewed that to make a small black person the before and the gold which you are afterwards, considering you only talked to 10 percent of black people in a city that's 45 percent African-American, I take offense to that and I hope that you do not display that," Brooks-Hodge said.

The class had planned to hang the quilt at a municipal building, but Brooks-Hodge demanded that it not be shown publicly.

The local chapter of the NAACP later sent a letter to the City Council in support of Brooks-Hodge, saying "This young man had not received training on how offensive depictions like this were to people of color. If he had, this incident could have been avoided."

Dori says that the Councilwoman's reaction spoiled what could have been an incredible learning opportunity.

"Here's what we've learned: these kids, they try to do something nice for the city, for their government, and they're greeted by the insanity of political correctness," said Dori.

by on May. 6, 2013 at 4:12 PM
Replies (31-40):
Tag3.0
by on May. 7, 2013 at 12:25 PM



Quoting Billiejeens:


You should look it up, I know that you don't know.

 word.



Whatever, your just a sore loser.


Billiejeens
by Gold Member on May. 7, 2013 at 12:25 PM
1 mom liked this

 

No, she shouldn't have said anything.

The black figure didn't become white, it became "gold"  gold is not a race.

If the figure had gained something and became "white" she would have an argument.

How do we think she feels about - blacklisted, black balled, black magic?

Quoting GotSomeKids:

Not only that, she addressed a student who was not responsible for making the artistic decisions for that particular quilting block.  How could she have possibly answered the question to the city council woman, if she wasn't the one who created the quilting block?  Even worse, it was inappropriate time to address it.  She should have talked with the teacher/parent reps instead of calling out a student in front of everyone.

Quoting Fjamrkr:

"a belief or doctrine that inherent differences among the various human races determine cultural or individual achievement, usually involving the idea that one's own race is superior and has the right to rule others."

Here in the south, you run into all kinds of blacks with this mindset exactly. Either they see whites as klansmen trying to oppress them or they talk down to you like they're above you because their ancestors went through a lot to get them the freedoms they take for granted now.
When's the last time you heard a white person in the news complain that somebody offended them by using a color?
It is imagined racism on her part. Whether you like that or not. She got offended by what she saw and what she imagined. Not by what the artist portrayed.


Quoting Tag3.0:

 

 


Quoting Fjamrkr:

Black people are some of the most color sensitive people I've ever met. Just because something is a dark color doesn't mean it's depicting an African American.

If you see it that way, that's your own racism and you need to deal with it on your own..

 


Make blanket statements much? 

Please look up the definition of racism before you use the word.




 

Billiejeens
by Gold Member on May. 7, 2013 at 12:26 PM

 


Quoting Tag3.0:

 

 

Quoting Billiejeens:

 

You should look it up, I know that you don't know.

 word.

 

 

Whatever, your just a sore loser.

 

What did I lose?

 

Tag3.0
by on May. 7, 2013 at 12:28 PM


Honesty, my senior thesis was on civil rights

Quoting Radarma:

 There it is.

Thanks for your honesty. Sincerely.





 



Tag3.0
by on May. 7, 2013 at 12:28 PM

Your mind!


Quoting Billiejeens:



Quoting Tag3.0:



Quoting Billiejeens:


You should look it up, I know that you don't know.

 word.



Whatever, your just a sore loser.


What did I lose?




MissTacoBell
by on May. 7, 2013 at 12:31 PM
Hold your horses now sugar.

"She doesn't think blacks are superior".

Ok, why is she ok with "any color just not black"? What about yellow? If an Asian councilman had burst out the same way she did she's already indicated that she wouldn't care "because its not black".

The problem with racism today is people (white, black, yellow, turquoise) are seeing things and attributing it to racism. It was clearly NOT intended to be racist---he just picked a dark color---but this woman MADE it a racial issue.

We should be celebrating the fact that these kids (and tons of adults) did/saw this project and given this image did not even remotely see the color of the people. That's called racial color blindness. It's the apex goal of transforming from a collection of races to a single united human race.

But then this woman decides to open her mouth and guess what? She RUINED that precious trait, all those kids now have an image of black people being angry and fault-finding people that they didn't have before. For what? She didn't prevent any racist inclinations, for none existed. If there are any there now, it's a product of her actions.

And if you think that's unfair, you just generalized whites by the racist whites in the south. Guess what, there's also a north, a west and an east. Why is it ok to generalize us?

Anyway whatever. Bring the "your racist, missy, 2000", I'm ready. I don't care.

For those of you who don't know, I left CM for a year plus after a certain user stalked me in every thread calling me a racist after I commented on a group of black people pulling guns on me. So whatever.


Quoting Tag3.0:

Im from the south sugar, born and raised. Im also black and am familiar with the south's history of racisim. The fact that segregated proms still exist shows the south has alot of growing up to do. 

You know what is fuinny, that woman never mentioned anything about klansman in her statement, yet here you are speaking for her. I find that alot of people like to do that for blacks, put words in their mouths as if they know how we all think and act. Fuck, Im black and I dont know how all blacks think. Her personal experiences may have led her to draw that conclusion. Shes older than me and Im in my late 20's. Ive been called all kinds of names by the glorious racist whites of the south. Some of them even had your atrocious mindset and assumed all us "coloreds" were the same. 

You are doing exactly what you claim this woman is doing. Stop it.

You also gave me the definition of racisim, what this woman did was not racisim. She doesn't think blacks are superior, unless I missed that part in her interview. 

As an educated negro, Iam well aware of those definitions and use the words wisely.




Quoting Fjamrkr:

"a belief or doctrine that inherent differences among the various human races determine cultural or individual achievement, usually involving the idea that one's own race is superior and has the right to rule others."



Here in the south, you run into all kinds of blacks with this mindset exactly. Either they see whites as klansmen trying to oppress them or they talk down to you like they're above you because their ancestors went through a lot to get them the freedoms they take for granted now.

When's the last time you heard a white person in the news complain that somebody offended them by using a color?

It is imagined racism on her part. Whether you like that or not. She got offended by what she saw and what she imagined. Not by what the artist portrayed.







Billiejeens
by Gold Member on May. 7, 2013 at 12:32 PM

 

Shoot, you might actually be on to something there.

Quoting Tag3.0:

Your mind!

 

Quoting Billiejeens:

 

 

Quoting Tag3.0:

 

 

Quoting Billiejeens:

 

You should look it up, I know that you don't know.

 word.

 

 

Whatever, your just a sore loser.

 

What did I lose?

 

 

 


 

Tag3.0
by on May. 7, 2013 at 12:33 PM



Quoting MissTacoBell:

Hold your horses now sugar.

"She doesn't think blacks are superior".

Ok, why is she ok with "any color just not black"? What about yellow? If an Asian councilman had burst out the same way she did she's already indicated that she wouldn't care "because its not black".

The problem with racism today is people (white, black, yellow, turquoise) are seeing things and attributing it to racism. It was clearly NOT intended to be racist---he just picked a dark color---but this woman MADE it a racial issue.

We should be celebrating the fact that these kids (and tons of adults) did/saw this project and given this image did not even remotely see the color of the people. That's called racial color blindness. It's the apex goal of transforming from a collection of races to a single united human race.

But then this woman decides to open her mouth and guess what? She RUINED that precious trait, all those kids now have an image of black people being angry and fault-finding people that they didn't have before. For what? She didn't prevent any racist inclinations, for none existed. If there are any there now, it's a product of her actions.

And if you think that's unfair, you just generalized whites by the racist whites in the south. Guess what, there's also a north, a west and an east. Why is it ok to generalize us?

Anyway whatever. Bring the "your racist, missy, 2000", I'm ready. I don't care.

For those of you who don't know, I left CM for a year plus after a certain user stalked me in every thread calling me a racist after I commented on a group of black people pulling guns on me. So whatever.


Quoting Tag3.0:

Im from the south sugar, born and raised. Im also black and am familiar with the south's history of racisim. The fact that segregated proms still exist shows the south has alot of growing up to do. 

You know what is fuinny, that woman never mentioned anything about klansman in her statement, yet here you are speaking for her. I find that alot of people like to do that for blacks, put words in their mouths as if they know how we all think and act. Fuck, Im black and I dont know how all blacks think. Her personal experiences may have led her to draw that conclusion. Shes older than me and Im in my late 20's. Ive been called all kinds of names by the glorious racist whites of the south. Some of them even had your atrocious mindset and assumed all us "coloreds" were the same. 

You are doing exactly what you claim this woman is doing. Stop it.

You also gave me the definition of racisim, what this woman did was not racisim. She doesn't think blacks are superior, unless I missed that part in her interview. 

As an educated negro, Iam well aware of those definitions and use the words wisely.




Quoting Fjamrkr:

"a belief or doctrine that inherent differences among the various human races determine cultural or individual achievement, usually involving the idea that one's own race is superior and has the right to rule others."



Here in the south, you run into all kinds of blacks with this mindset exactly. Either they see whites as klansmen trying to oppress them or they talk down to you like they're above you because their ancestors went through a lot to get them the freedoms they take for granted now.

When's the last time you heard a white person in the news complain that somebody offended them by using a color?

It is imagined racism on her part. Whether you like that or not. She got offended by what she saw and what she imagined. Not by what the artist portrayed.







Youre too much and dont read well. I lived in the south, thats why Iam speaking about racist whites who live there. Not whites in general, but the ones who have expressed their distaste for members of my race.

Make sense yet? 

She didnt say anything about blacks being better. She didnt imply blacks were superior. 


MissTacoBell
by on May. 7, 2013 at 12:37 PM
Yes she did! When it comes to racist images, anything but black was fine. Meaning Asian, Indian, NA, etc was fine by her, meaning it was more important to be sensitive to black people than other races. That's superiority.


Quoting Tag3.0:




Quoting MissTacoBell:

Hold your horses now sugar.



"She doesn't think blacks are superior".



Ok, why is she ok with "any color just not black"? What about yellow? If an Asian councilman had burst out the same way she did she's already indicated that she wouldn't care "because its not black".



The problem with racism today is people (white, black, yellow, turquoise) are seeing things and attributing it to racism. It was clearly NOT intended to be racist---he just picked a dark color---but this woman MADE it a racial issue.



We should be celebrating the fact that these kids (and tons of adults) did/saw this project and given this image did not even remotely see the color of the people. That's called racial color blindness. It's the apex goal of transforming from a collection of races to a single united human race.



But then this woman decides to open her mouth and guess what? She RUINED that precious trait, all those kids now have an image of black people being angry and fault-finding people that they didn't have before. For what? She didn't prevent any racist inclinations, for none existed. If there are any there now, it's a product of her actions.



And if you think that's unfair, you just generalized whites by the racist whites in the south. Guess what, there's also a north, a west and an east. Why is it ok to generalize us?



Anyway whatever. Bring the "your racist, missy, 2000", I'm ready. I don't care.



For those of you who don't know, I left CM for a year plus after a certain user stalked me in every thread calling me a racist after I commented on a group of black people pulling guns on me. So whatever.





Quoting Tag3.0:

Im from the south sugar, born and raised. Im also black and am familiar with the south's history of racisim. The fact that segregated proms still exist shows the south has alot of growing up to do. 

You know what is fuinny, that woman never mentioned anything about klansman in her statement, yet here you are speaking for her. I find that alot of people like to do that for blacks, put words in their mouths as if they know how we all think and act. Fuck, Im black and I dont know how all blacks think. Her personal experiences may have led her to draw that conclusion. Shes older than me and Im in my late 20's. Ive been called all kinds of names by the glorious racist whites of the south. Some of them even had your atrocious mindset and assumed all us "coloreds" were the same. 

You are doing exactly what you claim this woman is doing. Stop it.

You also gave me the definition of racisim, what this woman did was not racisim. She doesn't think blacks are superior, unless I missed that part in her interview. 

As an educated negro, Iam well aware of those definitions and use the words wisely.





Quoting Fjamrkr:

"a belief or doctrine that inherent differences among the various human races determine cultural or individual achievement, usually involving the idea that one's own race is superior and has the right to rule others."





Here in the south, you run into all kinds of blacks with this mindset exactly. Either they see whites as klansmen trying to oppress them or they talk down to you like they're above you because their ancestors went through a lot to get them the freedoms they take for granted now.


When's the last time you heard a white person in the news complain that somebody offended them by using a color?


It is imagined racism on her part. Whether you like that or not. She got offended by what she saw and what she imagined. Not by what the artist portrayed.











Youre too much and dont read well. I lived in the south, thats why Iam speaking about racist whites who live there. Not whites in general, but the ones who have expressed their distaste for members of my race.

Make sense yet? 

She didnt say anything about blacks being better. She didnt imply blacks were superior. 




Lizard_Lina
by Silver Member on May. 7, 2013 at 12:38 PM
Not to sound stupid, but I took it as they were in the dark, and now they're enlightened. Dark color, light color. I mean really? People will find a reason to be offended by just about everything these days *Smh* fucking ridiculous.
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