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An interesting read, to say the least... I have never had any desire to shop in this store.

What's your take?  I would be interested to find out....


Abercrombie & Fitch CEO Explains Why He Hates Fat Chicks

World

Abercrombie & Fitch CEO Explains Why He Hates Fat Chicks

Anyone who’s been to Abercrombie & Fitch in the last few years has probably noticed that they don’t carry XL or XXL sizes of women’s clothing because they don’t  want overweight women wearing their brand.

According to this popular teen clothing retailer, fat chicks will just never be a part of the “in” crowd.

They take a big risk with this tactic because two of Abercrombie’s biggest competitors, H&M and American Eagle, both offer XXL sizes for men and women.

The largest women’s pants available at Abercrombie are a size 10, while H&M goes up to 16 and American Eagle goes even farther to 18.
Abercrombie’s attitude towards plus-sized women derives from CEO Mike Jeffries. Robin Lewis, author of The New Rules of Retail, spoke to Business Insider about the kind of people Jeffries wants advertising his brand.

“He doesn’t want larger people shopping in his store, he wants thin and beautiful people,” Lewis said. “He doesn’t want his core customers to see people who aren’t as hot as them wearing his clothing. People who wear his clothing should feel like they’re one of the ‘cool kids.’”

Lewis said that the only reason Abercrombie offers XL and XXL in men’s sizes is to appeal to large athletes.

In a 2006 interview with Salon, Jeffries confirmed that the communication between hot people is his primary marketing tactic.

“It’s almost everything. That’s why we hire good-looking people in our stores. Because good-looking people attract other good-looking people, and we want to market to cool, good-looking people. We don’t market to anyone other than that,” he said.

Jeffries also told Salon that he wasn’t bothered by excluding fat people. In fact, he said that not limiting his ideal demographic would make his clothing less desirable.

“In every school there are the cool and popular kids, and then there are the not-so-cool kids,” he told the site. “Candidly, we go after the cool kids. We go after the attractive all-American kid with a great attitude and a lot of friends. A lot of people don’t belong [in our clothes], and they can’t belong. Are we exclusionary? Absolutely. Those companies that are in trouble are trying to target everybody: young, old, fat, skinny. But then you become totally vanilla. You don’t alienate anybody, but you don’t excite anybody, either,” he told Salon.

One might wonder why Mike Jeffries only wants to be in the company of good-looking people. That curiosity will end after seeing what this freak looks like.

After seeing a picture of Mike Jeffries, it can only be concluded that he was never around good-looking people as a kid and is now making up for the glamorous youth he wishes he had.

by on May. 7, 2013 at 11:30 AM
Replies (301-309):
SentRegards
by Member on May. 8, 2013 at 1:07 PM
Anyone know what FUBU means? For Us By Us... by daymond John, a black guy.....

Y'all are getting all riled up over nothing new
squocket
by Member on May. 8, 2013 at 1:25 PM
1 mom liked this

Well of course not because there is currently only one store doing it. There are still plenty of places for larger people to get fashionable clothing. If the availability of certain clothing styles was actually restricted, it might motivate some people to lose weight.


Quoting Traci_Momof2:

 All sorts of overweight or obese people have all sorts of different motivators that encourage them to do something about their condition.

I have never known one person to be motivated by the fact that a particular clothing store doesn't carry their size, or that the CEO of that store thinks they are uncool.


Quoting squocket:

Perhaps. But isn't there also the possibility that making it harder for people to excuse their (changeable) faults will motivate them to do something about it?

I am not saying that Jefferies has the well-being of any one person in mind. I don't think that he does. However, I do think that his approach could be a positive motivator for some people.


Quoting parentalrights1:

It's not tough love. What a crock of shit. This is about vanity and shallowness. Nothing to do with health.

People are trying to preach accepting eachother and accepting ourselves not to say that it's healthy or good to be overweight, but to not feel like disgusting, ugly trash that others want them too. When people pick at fat people and exclude them, it's about vanity and a sense or superiority. It's not to encourage a more healthy lifestyle and you know it.

If you want to encourage health then there are more productive ways then making them hate themselves.
Making people hate themselves will only cause depression and make the problem worse


Quoting squocket:

What an excellent thing to do. People who are overweight should be reminded of their condition and should not wear certain styles of clothing (not really talking about brand names here, but certain pants styles and revealing tops). I get that this guy comes off as a douche, but I feel like this is an attempt to motivate people to lose weight if they want to be a part of society and why shouldn't we encourage that? Our culture coddles those who refuse to better themselves way too much. A little tough love seems like it might be a good approach.








mamabear0791
by Member on May. 8, 2013 at 2:31 PM

He can choose his demographic, but I can choose where i will buy...and it will not be there, even though my DD, nephews and nieces could wear that size. 

His attitude stinks.

Traci_Momof2
by Silver Member on May. 8, 2013 at 2:39 PM

 Doubt it.  My DH has struggled with weight pretty much his entire adult life.  It is not easy for him to lose weight and keep weight off.  I can tell you that clothing availability has nothing to do with his motivation to lose weight or keep it off.  If there was a lack of available larger size clothing, all it would do is induce depression, like a pp said.

What motivates my DH is feeling good in his own skin, his kids and wanting to be there for their graduation and weddings, me and not wanting to leave me a widow at a young age.  Those are the kinds of things that will truly motivate a person to be healthy.  Not clothing.


Quoting squocket:

Well of course not because there is currently only one store doing it. There are still plenty of places for larger people to get fashionable clothing. If the availability of certain clothing styles was actually restricted, it might motivate some people to lose weight.

 

Quoting Traci_Momof2:

 All sorts of overweight or obese people have all sorts of different motivators that encourage them to do something about their condition.

I have never known one person to be motivated by the fact that a particular clothing store doesn't carry their size, or that the CEO of that store thinks they are uncool.

 

Quoting squocket:

Perhaps. But isn't there also the possibility that making it harder for people to excuse their (changeable) faults will motivate them to do something about it?

I am not saying that Jefferies has the well-being of any one person in mind. I don't think that he does. However, I do think that his approach could be a positive motivator for some people.

 

Quoting parentalrights1:

It's not tough love. What a crock of shit. This is about vanity and shallowness. Nothing to do with health.

People are trying to preach accepting eachother and accepting ourselves not to say that it's healthy or good to be overweight, but to not feel like disgusting, ugly trash that others want them too. When people pick at fat people and exclude them, it's about vanity and a sense or superiority. It's not to encourage a more healthy lifestyle and you know it.

If you want to encourage health then there are more productive ways then making them hate themselves.
Making people hate themselves will only cause depression and make the problem worse


Quoting squocket:

What an excellent thing to do. People who are overweight should be reminded of their condition and should not wear certain styles of clothing (not really talking about brand names here, but certain pants styles and revealing tops). I get that this guy comes off as a douche, but I feel like this is an attempt to motivate people to lose weight if they want to be a part of society and why shouldn't we encourage that? Our culture coddles those who refuse to better themselves way too much. A little tough love seems like it might be a good approach.


 

 

 

 

 

 


 

pamelax3
by Gold Member on May. 8, 2013 at 2:46 PM

I do not shop there and never have the clothing is just way to over priced..with that said, his store, his choice

-Celestial-
by Pepperlynn on May. 8, 2013 at 2:49 PM

He's talking about looking like cool kids? Really? Dude, you wouldn't even qualify to wear your own tacky clothing line.

Oh who the hell am I kidding, having some kind of procedure, good or bad, is the cool thing these days. Unrecognizable in some cases.

Redwall
by Silver Member on May. 8, 2013 at 7:47 PM

While I think that's might horrible, as the CEO does have that right....

SunshneDaydream
by Silver Member on May. 8, 2013 at 8:14 PM

I was gonna say he looks like the kid in Mask

Quoting bibdybobdyboob:

Wow, he looks like  the cartoon fish on Sponge Bob.


Quoting MomofHDFandNWF:

This is the CEO of Abercrombie @ Fitch... he is 61 years old and (IMHO) looks like a perfect candidate for why NOT to get plastic surgery....






SLTmom
by Bronze Member on May. 8, 2013 at 8:18 PM

Last time I looked, there weren't any ugly/overweight VS models or CK studs.  It's not uncommon.  He is just being open and honest about it.

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