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America leads the industrialized world- in infant death rates

Posted by on May. 8, 2013 at 3:31 PM
  • 28 Replies

Excuse me if this has been posted before, but this report really struck home with me. I am aware that we are bound to have more deaths just to the sheer quantity of people, but still the highest? That is just horrible, what are your thoughts?

The Democratic Republic of Congo is the world's toughest place to raise children, Save the Children reports.

Finland was named the best place to be a mother, with Sweden and Norway following in second and third places.

The charity compared factors such as maternal health, child mortality, education and income in 176 countries.

In India, over 300,000 babies die within 24 hours of being born, accounting for 29% of all newborn deaths worldwide, the report says.

The 10 bottom-ranked countries were all from sub-Saharan Africa, with one woman in 30 dying from pregnancy-related causes on average and one child in seven dying before his or her fifth birthday.

In DR Congo, war and poverty have left mothers malnourished and unsupported at the most vulnerable time of their lives.

The next worst countries listed were Somalia, Sierra Leone, Mali, Niger, Central African Republic, The Gambia, Nigeria, Chad and Ivory Coast.

Save the Children 2013 report

  • Save the Children's Mother's Index ranked 176 countries
  • Indicators include maternal health, under-five mortality, and women's education, income and political status
  • Sub-Saharan Africa takes the bottom ten spots, with DR Congo deemed the "worst"
  • Nordic countries take the top spots, with Finland, Sweden and Norway first, second, and third respectively
  • In DR Congo, one in 30 women die from pregnancy-related causes, whereas in Finland it is one in 12,200
  • South Asia, which accounts for 24% of the world's population, recorded 40% of the world's newborn deaths

The charity says that lack of nutrition is key to high mother and infant mortality rates in sub-Saharan Africa, with 10-20% of mothers underweight.

In contrast, the results show that Finland is the best place to be a mother, with the risk of death through pregnancy one in 12,200 and Finnish children getting almost 17 years of formal education.

Sweden, Norway, Iceland and The Netherlands were also in the top 10, with the US trailing at 30.

Surprisingly, the report found that the US has the highest death rate in newborns in the industrialised world, with 11,300 babies dying on the day they are born each year.

The charity says this is due in part to the US's large population, as well as the high number of babies born too early. The US has one of the highest preterm birth rates in the world at a rate of one in eight.

The report also found that mothers and babies die in greater numbers in South Asia than in any other region with an estimated 423,000 babies dying on the day they are born each year.

India also has more maternal deaths than in any other country with 56,000 per year.

"In India... economic growth has been impressive but the benefits have been shared unequally," the report says.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-22430608

 

by on May. 8, 2013 at 3:31 PM
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Replies (1-10):
morrigan914
by Bronze Member on May. 8, 2013 at 5:57 PM
No one?
Fjamrkr
by on May. 8, 2013 at 6:00 PM
I think if mothers did skin to skin with their babies rather than letting them go to the nursery, it would cut back on things like this a small amount.
Just my opinion though.
Fjamrkr
by on May. 8, 2013 at 6:01 PM
1 mom liked this
Me! I'm here! Bump bump.


Quoting morrigan914:

No one?

Fjamrkr
by on May. 8, 2013 at 9:21 PM
MOAR BUMPS.
Fjamrkr
by on May. 8, 2013 at 9:21 PM
Bump bump.
morrigan914
by Bronze Member on May. 8, 2013 at 9:26 PM
I was extremely fortunate to have delivered in 3 different hospitals that always roomed in. The only reason I breastfed my babies was because, after the birth of my first baby at 17, the nurse put my baby on my chest and said, "Feed her" she didn't ask my what I wanted, she told me what the baby needed. I breastfed all my babies past 13 months, all due to the one nurse :)
Quoting Fjamrkr:

I think if mothers did skin to skin with their babies rather than letting them go to the nursery, it would cut back on things like this a small amount.
Just my opinion though.

Fjamrkr
by on May. 8, 2013 at 9:29 PM
Same here! I kept trying to get my baby to latch and nothing happened. The nurse was finally like " let me help" and showed me what to do.


Quoting morrigan914:

I was extremely fortunate to have delivered in 3 different hospitals that always roomed in. The only reason I breastfed my babies was because, after the birth of my first baby at 17, the nurse put my baby on my chest and said, "Feed her" she didn't ask my what I wanted, she told me what the baby needed. I breastfed all my babies past 13 months, all due to the one nurse :)
Quoting Fjamrkr:

I think if mothers did skin to skin with their babies rather than letting them go to the nursery, it would cut back on things like this a small amount.

Just my opinion though.


Carpy
by Ruby Member on May. 8, 2013 at 9:42 PM


The US has the highest maternal and infant mortality rates among the high-income countries, and among the lowest life expectancies. The result of these cutbacks in spending on health for the poor and the old would be further deterioration. Is this really politically acceptable?”—Martin Wolf, columnist, Financial Times, April 12, 2011

Financial Times columnist Martin Wolf resurrects one of the hoariest myths of all about the U.S.-backed Medicaid system to attack GOP Rep. Paul Ryan’s budget cutbacks to government health care.

In his column, “The Radical Right and the US State,” Wolf, a columnist I ordinarily enjoy reading, has repeated a myth that has already been roundly dismissed by economists and debunked by medical experts, that is, the U.S. has one of the highest infant mortality rates in the developed world.

Talk about stretching a point until it snaps. Even the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, an international consortium of 31 countries which collects economic data, warns against these country-to-country infant mortality comparisons, because they are unfair. 

"Some of the international variation in infant and neonatal mortality rates may be due to variations among countries in registering practices of premature infants (whether they are reported as live births or not)," the OECD says.

And that’s the key.

The Center for Disease Control says the U.S. ranks 29th in the world for infant mortality rates, behind most other developed nations. But this ranking ignores other statistical nuances that, if adjusted for, would show the U.S. actually has much better care for infants than these rankings allow.

The U.S. is supposedly worse than Greece, Northern Ireland, Cuba and Hungary in infant mortality rates. And the U.S. is supposedly on a par with Slovakia and Poland.

CNN, the New York Times, MSNBC, CNBC, The Economist magazine and numerous media outlets across the country routinely report the U.S. as abysmal in terms of infant mortality, without delving into what is behind this ranking (I reported this controversy to you in 2009).

Many media outlets rely on the Commonwealth Fund, a nonprofit research group, which routinely flunks the U.S. health system using the infant mortality rate. 

The U.S. ranks poorly on the infant mortality list largely because this country actually counts neonatal deaths, notably premature infant fatalities, unlike other countries who don't count these infant deaths. 

"In several countries, such as in the United States, Canada and the Nordic countries, very premature babies (with relatively low odds of survival) are registered as live births, which increases mortality rates compared with other countries that do not register them as live births,” the OECD says.

Other statistical quirks give the U.S. an unjustifiably poor showing in this ranking compared to other countries. 

Start with the definition of the infant mortality rate. 

The World Health Organization [WHO] defines a country's infant mortality rate as the number of infants who die between birth and age one, per 1,000 live births. 

WHO says a live birth is when a baby shows any sign of life, even if, say, a low birth weight baby takes one single breath, or has one heartbeat.

The U.S. uses this definition. But other countries do not -- so they don't count premature or severely ill babies as live births-or deaths.

The United States actually counts all births if they show any sign of life, regardless of prematurity, or size, or duration of life, notes Bernardine Healy, former director of the National Institutes of Health and former president and chief executive of the American Red Cross

And that includes stillbirths, which many other countries do not count, much less report.

Also, what counts as a birth varies from country to country. In Austria and Germany, fetal weight must be at least 500 grams (1 pound) before these countries count these infants as live births, Healy notes. 

In other parts of Europe, such as Switzerland, the fetus must be at least 30 centimeters (12 inches) long. In Belgium and France, births at less than 26 weeks of pregnancy are registered as lifeless, and are not counted, Healy says.

And some countries don't reliably register babies who die within the first 24 hours of birth, Healy notes.

Norway, which has one of the lowest infant mortality rates, shows no better infant survival than the United States when you factor in Norway's underweight infants who are not now counted, says Nicholas Eberstadt, a scholar at the American Enterprise Institute.

Moreover, the ranking doesn't take into account that the US has a diverse, heterogeneous population, Healy adds, unlike, say, in Iceland, which tracks all infant deaths regardless of factor, but has a population under 300,000 that is 94% homogenous.

Likewise, Finland and Japan do not have the ethnic and cultural diversity of the U.S.'s 300 million-plus citizens. 

Plus, the U.S. has a high rate of teen pregnancies, teens who smoke, who take drugs, who are obese and uneducated, all factors which cause higher infant mortality rates.

And the US has more mothers taking fertility treatments, which keeps the rate of pregnancy high due to multiple-birth pregnancies.

Moreover, the U.S. is not losing healthy babies, as the scary stats imply. Most of the babies who die are either premature or born seriously ill, including those with congenital malformations.

The U.S. ranks much better on a measure that the World Health Organization says is more accurate, the perinatal mortality rate, defined as death between 22 weeks' gestation and seven days after birth. According to the WHO 2006 report on Neonatal and Perinatal Mortality, the  U.S. comes in at 16th -- and even higher if you knock out several tiny countries with tiny birthrates and populations, such as Martinique and San Marino.

-Celestial-
by Pepperlynn on May. 8, 2013 at 9:55 PM
1 mom liked this

turtle68
by Mahinaarangi on May. 8, 2013 at 10:13 PM
1 mom liked this

Unnecessary inductions and c-sections 

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