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Banned in America to protect the children...ah the logic

Posted by on May. 8, 2013 at 10:40 PM
  • 10 Replies
1 mom liked this

by on May. 8, 2013 at 10:40 PM
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Replies (1-10):
randi1978
by Bronze Member on May. 8, 2013 at 10:45 PM
1 mom liked this

I love Kinder Surprise Eggs.  Stupid that they cannot be sold here.

I have friends ship them to me :)

I collect the toys.

kailu1835
by Ruby Member on May. 8, 2013 at 10:46 PM
What is that?
sweet-a-kins
by Emerald Member on May. 8, 2013 at 10:49 PM

Kinder Surprise Eggs

Kinder Surprise, also known as Kinder Eggs, is a confection originally intended for children in the form of a chocolate egg containing a small toy, often requiring assembly.

Kinder Surprise originated in 1972 in Italy. The manufacturer is Ferrero. The toys are designed by both inside designers and external freelancers, for example the French artist André Roche based in Munich, and manufactured by many companies worldwide such as Produzioni Editoriali Aprile, a small company based in Turin, Italy, run and founded by two brothers, Ruggero and Valerio Aprile.

Kinder Surprise egg

Kinder Eggs containing toys are not suitable for children under the age of three due to the small parts which may be ingested or inhaled. They are sold all over the world excluding the United States, where the 1938 Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act prohibits embedding "non-nutritive items" in confections. Additionally, the Consumer Product Safety Commission issued a recall on the eggs in 1997. Kinder Egg-like confections are available, but only in a form filled with small candies and/or stickers. There are some stores in the United States that sell genuine Kinder Eggs, often in conjunction with other imported British or other European sweets, although their importation is technically illegal due to the 1938 law and 1997 recall.

Kinder Egg commercial:

In Europe, their popularity has spread beyond their intended market, and they have become a minor cult phenomenon among discerning adults. There is even a thriving collector's market for the toys. This is especially true in Germany, where the manufacturer includes higher-quality toys than those available elsewhere (more details below). There are many types of toys available, but some of the most popular with collectors include the ever-changing series of small hand-painted figures (some have to be assembled), which are said to be in every seventh egg (ad slogan: "Jetzt in jedem siebten Ei"); cartoon characters (sometimes called "stick figures", which is a mistranslation of the German "Steckfiguren"); metal figures and jigsaw puzzles. Seasonal eggs are introduced around the holidays, such as the limited-edition creche collections (featuring such characters as the three kings, baby Jesus, and assorted barnyard animals) found around Christmas, and the huge ones found at Easter (extremely popular in Italy).

Questions, remarks or sweet memories?

Quoting kailu1835:

What is that?


Goodwoman614
by Satan on May. 8, 2013 at 11:09 PM

Lol, my friend in Germany posted this to her Facebook a couple weeks ago.

kailu1835
by Ruby Member on May. 8, 2013 at 11:11 PM
I ended up googling deaths by kindereggs and came up with a huge whopping number of..... Wait for it....

6 deaths worldwide.

Hardly ban worthy.


Quoting sweet-a-kins:

Kinder Surprise Eggs

Kinder Surprise, also known as Kinder Eggs, is a confection originally intended for children in the form of a chocolate egg containing a small toy, often requiring assembly.

Kinder Surprise originated in 1972 in Italy. The manufacturer is Ferrero. The toys are designed by both inside designers and external freelancers, for example the French artist André Roche based in Munich, and manufactured by many companies worldwide such as Produzioni Editoriali Aprile, a small company based in Turin, Italy, run and founded by two brothers, Ruggero and Valerio Aprile.

Kinder Surprise egg

Kinder Eggs containing toys are not suitable for children under the age of three due to the small parts which may be ingested or inhaled. They are sold all over the world excluding the United States, where the 1938 Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act prohibits embedding "non-nutritive items" in confections. Additionally, the Consumer Product Safety Commission issued a recall on the eggs in 1997. Kinder Egg-like confections are available, but only in a form filled with small candies and/or stickers. There are some stores in the United States that sell genuine Kinder Eggs, often in conjunction with other imported British or other European sweets, although their importation is technically illegal due to the 1938 law and 1997 recall.

Kinder Egg commercial:

In Europe, their popularity has spread beyond their intended market, and they have become a minor cult phenomenon among discerning adults. There is even a thriving collector's market for the toys. This is especially true in Germany, where the manufacturer includes higher-quality toys than those available elsewhere (more details below). There are many types of toys available, but some of the most popular with collectors include the ever-changing series of small hand-painted figures (some have to be assembled), which are said to be in every seventh egg (ad slogan: "Jetzt in jedem siebten Ei"); cartoon characters (sometimes called "stick figures", which is a mistranslation of the German "Steckfiguren"); metal figures and jigsaw puzzles. Seasonal eggs are introduced around the holidays, such as the limited-edition creche collections (featuring such characters as the three kings, baby Jesus, and assorted barnyard animals) found around Christmas, and the huge ones found at Easter (extremely popular in Italy).

Questions, remarks or sweet memories?

Quoting kailu1835:

What is that?


-Celestial-
by Pepperlynn on May. 8, 2013 at 11:19 PM
2 moms liked this

lga1965
by on May. 8, 2013 at 11:29 PM

 well, that is really cool. How fun for kids!

I haven't heard of them before but it just somehow makes a crazy kind of sense that the USA would ban them but allow little kids to have guns and go shooting as a family activity. Arghhhhh.

It is enough to make me want to move...maybe to Italy, or Sweden? Somewhere that features a population of people who are logical and non-violent. ...Sigh....

Quoting sweet-a-kins:

Kinder Surprise Eggs

Kinder Surprise, also known as Kinder Eggs, is a confection originally intended for children in the form of a chocolate egg containing a small toy, often requiring assembly.

Kinder Surprise originated in 1972 in Italy. The manufacturer is Ferrero. The toys are designed by both inside designers and external freelancers, for example the French artist André Roche based in Munich, and manufactured by many companies worldwide such as Produzioni Editoriali Aprile, a small company based in Turin, Italy, run and founded by two brothers, Ruggero and Valerio Aprile.

Kinder Surprise egg

Kinder Eggs containing toys are not suitable for children under the age of three due to the small parts which may be ingested or inhaled. They are sold all over the world excluding the United States, where the 1938 Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act prohibits embedding "non-nutritive items" in confections. Additionally, the Consumer Product Safety Commission issued a recall on the eggs in 1997. Kinder Egg-like confections are available, but only in a form filled with small candies and/or stickers. There are some stores in the United States that sell genuine Kinder Eggs, often in conjunction with other imported British or other European sweets, although their importation is technically illegal due to the 1938 law and 1997 recall.

Kinder Egg commercial:

In Europe, their popularity has spread beyond their intended market, and they have become a minor cult phenomenon among discerning adults. There is even a thriving collector's market for the toys. This is especially true in Germany, where the manufacturer includes higher-quality toys than those available elsewhere (more details below). There are many types of toys available, but some of the most popular with collectors include the ever-changing series of small hand-painted figures (some have to be assembled), which are said to be in every seventh egg (ad slogan: "Jetzt in jedem siebten Ei"); cartoon characters (sometimes called "stick figures", which is a mistranslation of the German "Steckfiguren"); metal figures and jigsaw puzzles. Seasonal eggs are introduced around the holidays, such as the limited-edition creche collections (featuring such characters as the three kings, baby Jesus, and assorted barnyard animals) found around Christmas, and the huge ones found at Easter (extremely popular in Italy).

Questions, remarks or sweet memories?

Quoting kailu1835:

What is that?


 

grandmab125
by Gold Member on May. 8, 2013 at 11:38 PM

 BIG S. I. G. H......

DestinyHLewis
by Destiny on May. 8, 2013 at 11:41 PM
1 mom liked this

My hubby brings those home anytime he is in Germany. We love them! However. Neither should be banned IMHO. Both come with a level a responsibility. I think stupid people who have kids should be banned before the item in question, but that is me. 

tooptimistic
by Kelly on May. 8, 2013 at 11:43 PM
1 mom liked this

My son sends them to his little brother and sister from Germany.   

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