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U.S. dairy industry petitions FDA to approve aspartame as hidden, unlabeled additive in milk, yogurt, eggnog and cream

Posted by on May. 20, 2013 at 4:27 AM
  • 32 Replies

The petition acknowledges that the use of non-nutritive sweeteners in optional characterizing flavoringingredients in milk is allowed under the existing regulatory scheme, with certain additional requirements. The regulatory framework governing the naming of standardized foods that do not fully comply with the relevant standards of identity changed with the passage of the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990 and FDA's rulemaking establishing the Agency's requirements for foods named by use of a nutrient content claim and a standardized term (§ 130.10 (21 CFR 130.10)). Section 130.10(d) allows the addition of safe and suitable ingredients to a food named by use of a nutrient content claim and a standardized term when these ingredients are used to, among other things, add sweetness to ensure that the modified food is not inferior in performance characteristic to the standardized food even if such ingredients are not specifically provided for by the relevant food standard. Therefore, while the milk standard of identity in § 131.110 only provides for the use of “nutritive sweetener” in an optional characterizing flavor, milk may contain a characterizing flavor that is sweetened with a non-nutritive sweetener if the food's label bears a nutrient content claim (e.g., “reduced calorie”) and the non-nutritive sweetener is used to add sweetness to the product so that it is not inferior in its sweetness property compared to its standardized counterpart. However, IDFA and NMPF argue that nutrient content claims such as “reduced calorie” are not attractive to children, and maintain that consumers can more easily identify the overall nutritional value of milk products that are flavored with non-nutritive sweeteners if the labels do not include such claims. Further, the petitioners assert that consumers do not recognize milk—including flavored milk—as necessarily containing sugar. Accordingly, the petitioners state that milk flavored with non-nutritive sweeteners should be labeled as milk without further claims so that consumers can “more easily identify its overall nutritional value.”

As to the additional dairy standards, IDFA and NMPF state that administrative efficiency counsels in favor of similar changes. As long as FDA is dedicating resources to amending the standard of identity for milk, they argue, the Agency should also amend the standards for these products at the same time. They state that it is most efficient to consider all of the proposals together. According to the petition, the requested changes to the additional dairy standards present the same issues as the milk standard, and it is therefore appropriate to consider all of the requested changes together.

https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2013/02/20/2013-03835/flavored-milk-petition-to-amend-the-standard-of-identity-for-milk-and-17-additional-dairy-products


Thoughts?

by on May. 20, 2013 at 4:27 AM
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Replies (1-10):
bellawomen
by Bronze Member on May. 20, 2013 at 4:32 AM
2 moms liked this
This is seriously disgusting. Leave milk alone.
sweetangie79
by Member on May. 20, 2013 at 8:05 AM
1 mom liked this

BUMP!

Bookwormy
by Platinum Member on May. 20, 2013 at 8:09 AM
1 mom liked this
Disgusting!
SuperChicken
by on May. 20, 2013 at 8:10 AM
2 moms liked this

I think people should know what they are ingesting.    That the dairy industry wants to be sneaky about what they put in the products they sell to the public makes them untrustworthy.    Not to mention that aspartame is really really bad for people.

yourspecialkid
by Platinum Member on May. 20, 2013 at 8:59 AM
3 moms liked this

I just fail to see the need for adding this to some products.  It should be listed as an ingredient...some people are sensitive to it.  I can't use it...makes my head hurt.

 

Kate_Momof3
by Silver Member on May. 20, 2013 at 9:01 AM
1 mom liked this

 It gives me migraines and makes me nauseous.

I'm really sensitive to it. If I order a regular Coke from a machine that has just dispensed something diet, I can taste it.

Quoting yourspecialkid:

I just fail to see the need for adding this to some products.  It should be listed as an ingredient...some people are sensitive to it.  I can't use it...makes my head hurt.

 

 

stormcris
by Christy on May. 20, 2013 at 9:13 AM
1 mom liked this

Well it also makes people fat...

Diet soda makes people fat? Really? How does that happen?

If losing weight were all about the calories, then consuming diet drinks would seem like a good idea. That's certainly what Coca-Cola wants us to believe in their new ad highlighting their efforts to fight obesity. They proudly promote the fact that they have 180 low- or no-calorie drinks and that they cut sugared drinks in schools by 90 percent.

Is that a good thing? In fact, it may be worse than having us all drink regular Coke (and the other food giants making diet drinks also push the same propaganda).

A new 14-year study of 66,118 women (supported by many other previous studies) found that the opposite seems to be true. Diet drinks may be worse than sugar-sweetened drinks, which are worse than fruit juices (but only fresh-squeezed fruit juices).

The study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, discovered some frightening facts that should make us all swear off diet drinks and products.

  1. Diet sodas raised the risk of diabetes more than sugar-sweetened sodas!
  2. Women who drank one 12-ounce diet soda had a 33 percent increased risk of Type 2 diabetes, and women who drank one 20-ounce soda had a 66 percent increased risk.
  3. Women who drank diet sodas drank twice as much as those who drank sugar-sweetened sodas because artificial sweeteners are more addictive and are hundreds to thousands of times sweeter than regular sugar.
  4. The average diet soda drinker consumes three diet drinks a day.

You might say that people who are overweight and just about to get diabetes drink more diet soda, but they scientifically controlled for body weight. And they found the artificial sweeteners increased diabetes independent of body weight!

This and other research shows how diet sodas make people fat and sick.

With that research I wonder what the real motivator is.

Quoting yourspecialkid:

I just fail to see the need for adding this to some products.  It should be listed as an ingredient...some people are sensitive to it.  I can't use it...makes my head hurt.

 


JMmama
by Bronze Member on May. 20, 2013 at 9:15 AM
2 moms liked this
It's like I tell my kids... If you are doing something you need to be sneaky about, it is probably something you shouldn't be doing.
Veni.Vidi.Vici.
by on May. 20, 2013 at 9:48 AM
1 mom liked this

shameful

Talee
by Gold Member on May. 20, 2013 at 9:55 AM
2 moms liked this

I've heard of this...its bullshit...this kind of thing must be labeled....just like GMOs...they dont want to be responsible.

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