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Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Acord condition PANDAS is rare, doctors say

Posted by on May. 29, 2013 at 7:13 PM
  • 21 Replies


Marianne Fox, the mother of the 17-year-old accused of planning a gunfire-and-explosives attack at West Albany High School, says her son suffers from a rare condition that can trigger obsessive-compulsive behavior.

In a statement issued through her attorney on Monday, Fox said that Grant Alan Acord suffers from Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorder Associated with Streptococcus (PANDAS).

On Tuesday, mid-valley health professionals said that the condition is rare, features multiple symptoms and can occur in varying degrees.

“It’s pretty uncommon,” said Dr. Tim Blumer of Samaritan Mental Health Family Center, who is board-certified in child and adolescent psychiatry and adult psychiatry. “In my career I’ve seen maybe three people that meet the criteria of PANDAS.”

Frank Moore, director of the Linn County Health Department, said his staff has never run across a case.

“I’ve checked with our crisis staff and developmentally disabled staff and no one can recall ever having had a request for services pertaining to it,” Moore said.

Although Blumer said PANDAS has been around for a long time, it was first associated with strep infections in the late 1990s. He said what is known is that the onset of symptoms occurs before puberty, that symptoms can suddenly worsen and they occur during or after a strep infection. It is thought that PANDAS is the body’s immune reaction to the infection that causes symptoms.

“It should be obvious when it happens,” Blumer said. “The symptoms are acute behaviors that would be recognizable.”

Those symptoms include obsessive-compulsive behavior and Tourette’s-like motor and vocal actions that include unwanted movements or noises.

The onset could come quickly or within weeks of having a strep infection, although Blumer said there is no definitive timeframe.

“Data is limited on causes and prognosis,” he said. And it varies case by case.

He noted that one person could have a short-lived PANDAS incident that responds to treatment, while another could have a much longer bout that continues as the person grows older.

Treatment involves an acute antibiotic that would be typical of someone with strep. Those types of standard treatments would continue as long as symptoms persist. Other treatments could involve a filtering of the blood or an infusion of immunoglobulin.

The bottom line is that little is really known about PANDAS. Blumer said data is not abundant for causes or treatments.

According to a report in The Oregonian newspaper, Fox had been in contact with author Beth Maloney, whose book “Saving Sammy” dealt with her son and his struggle with PANDAS.

The Oregonian story said Fox and Maloney had been in contact since 2011. Maloney said that Fox was looking to expand treatment for her son beyond antibiotics and was trying to find an insurer to cover additional treatment.

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This is in the town right next to me...I was talking to couple of people about this and they think he should go to prision just like anyone else...What do you think should happen to him?

by on May. 29, 2013 at 7:13 PM
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1Giovanni
by Becca on May. 29, 2013 at 7:17 PM

West Albany student arrested on bomb charges

(Scroll down for video)

Police receive tip that the 17-year-old allegedly planned to blow up the school

 

A 17-year-old West Albany High School student was arrested by Albany police Thursday night after authorities received a tip that he was “making a bomb with the intention of blowing up the school,” according to a 911 caller.

The youth had asked his friends to film the incident when it happened, the caller said.

Grant Alan Acord, 17, was lodged in the Linn Benton Juvenile Detention Facility on charges of two counts of possession of a destructive device and two counts of manufacture of a destructive device.

Police did not disclose the nature of the explosives.

Acord was taken into custody at his house in the 2400 block of Violet Street N.W. in North Albany at 10:26 p.m. Thursday, according to an Albany police news release.

Evidence of the bomb-making and two bombs were found at a family member’s residence in the 2600 block of Raymond Court N.W., the news release states.

On Friday, members of the Oregon State Police Explosives Unit removed the items from the Raymond Court residence after a search warrant was obtained.

“Now our folks are going to go in and complete the search of the residence,” said Capt. Eric Carter, of the Albany Police Department.

Residents near Raymond Court said they were surprised by the police activity in their nice, quiet neighborhood.

An initial security sweep was conducted at West Albany High School on Thursday night. A more extensive school search, including the use of explosives detection dogs from OSP, was done Friday afternoon. Nothing was found during that search.

In addition to Albany police, the large law enforcement presence included members of the Oregon State Police Explosives Unit and officers from Homeland Security, Vancouver, Wash., Port of Portland and the city of Portland. There were four K9/handler teams.

“This is being done for precautionary measures. School is not in session today. We have that opportunity. We don’t want to take any chances. This is serious and significant enough,” Carter said.

Police receive tip that 17-year-old allegedly planned to blow up WAHS

As explosive sniffing canines exited the north side of the high school on Friday afternoon, the Bulldog softball team played at the southwest end of campus.

Junior Hayden Layne said most students were shocked.

“It’s kind of scary to think that he was making a bomb for school,” said senior Joe Miller, as he walked to the softball diamond.

West Albany High School Principal Susie Orsborn declined comment Friday afternoon.

The Albany Police Department is conducting the investigation with the Benton County District Attorney’s Office, the Benton County Sheriff’s Office, the Greater Albany Public Schools and Albany Fire Department.

Those with information about the case can call the Albany Police detective unit at 541-917-7686.

http://www.gazettetimes.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/west-albany-student-arrested-on-bomb-charges/article_ed123ab4-01bf-56dc-86a9-8c400fa5065a.html

Ms.KitKat
by Platinum Member on May. 29, 2013 at 7:33 PM

 I really do not know anything of this disease/disorder. Does it make the individual pyschotic and delusional not to mention violent? I can not see how OCD can be blamed for what happened (or could have happened) in this instance.

Euphoric
by Bazinga! on May. 29, 2013 at 7:35 PM

 crazy

LIMom1105
by Bronze Member on May. 29, 2013 at 7:36 PM
It can trigger OCD and repetitive behavior as well as tics. I do not think delusional behavior is part of PANDAS.

It sounds like quite a stretch to me.
1Giovanni
by Becca on May. 29, 2013 at 7:37 PM

I don't know much about it ether. 

Quoting Ms.KitKat:

 I really do not know anything of this disease/disorder. Does it make the individual pyschotic and delusional not to mention violent? I can not see how OCD can be blamed for what happened (or could have happened) in this instance.


Ms.KitKat
by Platinum Member on May. 29, 2013 at 7:38 PM
1 mom liked this

 

Characteristics [edit]

In addition to an OCD or tic disorder diagnosis, children may have other symptoms associated with exacerbations such as emotional lability, enuresis, anxiety, and deterioration in handwriting.[1] In the PANDAS model, this abrupt onset is thought to be preceded by a strep throat infection. As the clinical spectrum of PANDAS appears to resemble that of Tourette's syndrome, some researchers hypothesized that PANDAS and Tourette's may be associated; this idea is controversial and a focus for current research.[3][8][9][10][11]

Labile affect or pseudobulbar affect refers to the pathological expression of laughter, crying, or smiling. It is also known as emotional lability, pathological laughter and crying, emotional incontinence, or, more recently, involuntary emotional expression disorder (IEED).[1] Patients may find themselves laughing uncontrollably at something that is only moderately funny, being unable to stop themselves for several minutes. Episodes may also be mood-incongruent: a patient might laugh uncontrollably when angry or frustrated, for example.

Labile affect is most commonly observed after brain injury or degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig disease), a form of motor neuron disease. It affects up to 50% of patients or up to 17,000 people, particularly those with pseudobulbar palsy.[2]It also occurs in approximately 10% of multiple sclerosis patients[3], signaling a degree of cognitive impairment.

While not as profoundly disabling as the physical symptoms of these diseases, labile affect can have a significant impact on individuals' social functioning and their relationships with others. In motor neuron disease, the majority of patients are cognitively normal; however, the appearance of uncontrollable emotions is commonly associated with learning disabilities. This may lead to severe embarrassment and avoidance of social interactions for the patient, which in turn has an impact on their coping mechanisms and their careers.

Treatment for labile affect is usually pharmacological, using antidepressants such as fluoxetine, citalopram, or amitriptyline in low to moderate doses. In the USA, a combination of dextromethorphan and a subtherapeutic dose of quinidine has been submitted to the FDA for approval to treat emotional lability.

It's from wiki but it's easy.... 

1Giovanni
by Becca on May. 29, 2013 at 7:49 PM

Thanks...I was going to do this but caught up with playing with my son.:)

Quoting Ms.KitKat:

 

Characteristics [edit]

In addition to an OCD or tic disorder diagnosis, children may have other symptoms associated with exacerbations such as emotional lability, enuresis, anxiety, and deterioration in handwriting.[1] In the PANDAS model, this abrupt onset is thought to be preceded by a strep throat infection. As the clinical spectrum of PANDAS appears to resemble that of Tourette's syndrome, some researchers hypothesized that PANDAS and Tourette's may be associated; this idea is controversial and a focus for current research.[3][8][9][10][11]

Labile affect or pseudobulbar affect refers to the pathological expression of laughter, crying, or smiling. It is also known as emotional lability, pathological laughter and crying, emotional incontinence, or, more recently, involuntary emotional expression disorder (IEED).[1] Patients may find themselves laughing uncontrollably at something that is only moderately funny, being unable to stop themselves for several minutes. Episodes may also be mood-incongruent: a patient might laugh uncontrollably when angry or frustrated, for example.

Labile affect is most commonly observed after brain injury or degeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as Lou Gehrig disease), a form of motor neuron disease. It affects up to 50% of patients or up to 17,000 people, particularly those with pseudobulbar palsy.[2]It also occurs in approximately 10% of multiple sclerosis patients[3], signaling a degree of cognitive impairment.

While not as profoundly disabling as the physical symptoms of these diseases, labile affect can have a significant impact on individuals' social functioning and their relationships with others. In motor neuron disease, the majority of patients are cognitively normal; however, the appearance of uncontrollable emotions is commonly associated with learning disabilities. This may lead to severe embarrassment and avoidance of social interactions for the patient, which in turn has an impact on their coping mechanisms and their careers.

Treatment for labile affect is usually pharmacological, using antidepressants such as fluoxetine, citalopram, or amitriptyline in low to moderate doses. In the USA, a combination of dextromethorphan and a subtherapeutic dose of quinidine has been submitted to the FDA for approval to treat emotional lability.

It's from wiki but it's easy.... 


quickbooksworm
by Silver Member on May. 29, 2013 at 7:50 PM

Christ on a cracker.  I think he should go to fucking jail like all the other nutters out there who do this shit.  Everyone who plans these kind of attacks is crazy.  Serial killers are crazy.  People who blow away innocent people in movie theaters and schools are crazy.  There is nothing normal about that behavior.  There is nothing normal about planning an attack on a school and putting bombs in your floor boards.  

This shit doesn't even come close to meeting the criteria of an insanity plea.  Granted, I don't know what I would do if that were my kid.  Chances are, it wouldn't be because it's very rare to pull something over on me.  And there had to be signs that went unnoticed.  But it seems that if the parents are willing to reach this far, perhaps they have been making excuses for this kid for a long time.  THIS shit is what happens when people raise snowflakes!

Sisteract
by Whoopie on May. 29, 2013 at 8:37 PM
2 moms liked this

Where did he get the money to buy the items needed to make the bombs? Is he working? Does he receive an allowance? Does he steal?

If he's sick and making bombs in his bedroom, he needs in-patient care.

Ms.KitKat
by Platinum Member on May. 29, 2013 at 8:38 PM

 Please- donl;t hold back- tell us how you really feel

LOL

I just so happen to agree with you completely BTW

Quoting quickbooksworm:

Christ on a cracker.  I think he should go to fucking jail like all the other nutters out there who do this shit.  Everyone who plans these kind of attacks is crazy.  Serial killers are crazy.  People who blow away innocent people in movie theaters and schools are crazy.  There is nothing normal about that behavior.  There is nothing normal about planning an attack on a school and putting bombs in your floor boards.  

This shit doesn't even come close to meeting the criteria of an insanity plea.  Granted, I don't know what I would do if that were my kid.  Chances are, it wouldn't be because it's very rare to pull something over on me.  And there had to be signs that went unnoticed.  But it seems that if the parents are willing to reach this far, perhaps they have been making excuses for this kid for a long time.  THIS shit is what happens when people raise snowflakes!

 

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