Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

After Kicking Out Illegal Aliens Alabama Is Putting American Citizens Back To Work

Posted by on May. 29, 2013 at 11:11 PM
  • 237 Replies
1 mom liked this

After Kicking Out Illegal Aliens Alabama Is Putting American Citizens Back To Work

JANUARY 30, 2012 BY KEVIN COACH COLLINS 15 COMMENTS

inShare10

 

Alabama and Arizona are being sued by Barack Hussein Obama to farther his insidious plan to erase our borders and allow millions of potential new Democrat voters to flow in and snuff out our liberties.

 Both states have taken strong measures to get their illegal alien problem under control and both are experiencing improvements in their unemployment rates, but the results in Alabama have been stunning.

 Since putting its tough anti-illegal alien bill (H. B. 56) into effect last September Alabama has seen an overnight increase in the number of her citizens working and a drop in the percentage of Alabamians collecting unemployment benefits.

 The numbers tell the story and they are embarrassing for Obama. In the first month after H.B. 56 became law Alabama's unemployment rate fell from 9.8 to 9.3 percent. Last month the number dropped to 8.1% which is .4% below the national average. Some quick math shows this is a 1.7% drop.

 The real life Main Street result of what Alabama's Republicans have done is visible across their state. Because of H.B. 56 an enraged Barack Obama is suing Alabama. The more than 41,000 Alabama families who now have a bread winner going off to work every day means nothing to Obama because they are not voting for Democrats anyway.

In just three months Alabama has moved up from being the 42nd worst unemployment state to the 28th  on the national list.

 The numbers from Alabama will continue to improve as more illegal aliens come to understand that the "Heart of Dixie" is not a place to sneak into.  Those with minimal skills, now filling jobs Americans want, will continue to leave and sneak into neighboring states.

 Both Georgia and Mississippi have unemployment rates substantially above the putative national average of 8.5%, and this promises to be a continuing pattern. As one state stands firmer against these illegal invaders its neighboring states will find them flooding their workplaces schools hospital and jails. Which part of this is hard to understand?

by on May. 29, 2013 at 11:11 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
Cutenessmom
by Bronze Member on May. 29, 2013 at 11:13 PM
2 moms liked this

blowing kisses

jehosoba84
by Jenn on May. 29, 2013 at 11:17 PM
3 moms liked this

 On what grounds is he suing Alabama? Is it illegal to kick out illegal aliens? I can't believe I even have to ask that question!!!

-Celestial-
by Pepperlynn on May. 29, 2013 at 11:20 PM
4 moms liked this

ATLANTA – It's unclear whether farmers in Georgia and Alabama will face a shortage of workers due to tough new laws targeting illegal immigration, but some producers said they have begun changing their plans for planting and harvesting this year's crops.

  • Tomato farmer Chad Smith, right, looks over one of his fields of in Steele, Ala., Oct. 3. Only a few of his field workers showed up after the new immigration law took effect.

    By Dave Martin, AP

    Tomato farmer Chad Smith, right, looks over one of his fields of in Steele, Ala., Oct. 3. Only a few of his field workers showed up after the new immigration law took effect.

By Dave Martin, AP

Tomato farmer Chad Smith, right, looks over one of his fields of in Steele, Ala., Oct. 3. Only a few of his field workers showed up after the new immigration law took effect.

Sponsored Links

Some farmers said they might reduce the number of acres they plant or shift to less labor-intensive crops, while others are bracing for higher labor prices and have turned to new recruiting tools to attract workers.

"We're expecting some shifts, but it's a bit too early to tell," said Charles Hall, executive director of the Georgia Fruit and Vegetable Growers Association.

Georgia and Alabama have approved laws that have tough enforcement provisions that farmers say are scaring migrant workers away from the states.

Since the laws were approved last year, farmers in both states have reported labor shortages because migrant workers aren't showing up and they say they can't find other workers to fill the jobs. Farmers and state officials have said that some produce was left to rot in the field last year because there weren't enough workers to help with the harvest.

Farmers have claimed not enough U.S. citizens want the jobs, but some said the issue is actually that producers won't offer a high enough wage to attract legal workers.

Brett Hall, Alabama's deputy agriculture commissioner, said nurseries across south Alabama are trying to find workers to fill about 2,000 jobs ahead of the spring growing season. Many nursery growers are staffing job fairs in hopes of attracting employees, he said.

Other growers aren't ordering seeds or new equipment because they anticipate a labor shortage, he said.

"Before this law, migrant workers would just show up. They knew when they were needed," Hall said. "That's not happening anymore."

In Georgia, some growers of the state's famed Vidalia onions are planting fewer acres of the labor-intensive crop, which could lead to a roughly 10 percent drop in production, said Bob Stafford, director of the Vidalia Onion Business Council.

Stafford said it's unclear if the smaller crop will mean consumers will pay more for the prized sweet onions because prices are dependent on many factors, including the weather and fuel costs.

Aries Haygood, chairman of the Vidalia Onion Committee, said he has reduced planting by about 15 percent at his farm near Lyons, Ga., because of labor concerns and other factors.

Haygood and some other farmers in both states are using a federal guest worker program, known as H-2A, which lets farmers bring in an unlimited number of temporary agriculture workers.

But some complain it's too expensive and doesn't allow enough flexibility.

Haygood said it's also tough to get the timing just right and sometimes his workers' visas run out before the end of the harvest.

Some members of Georgia's congressional delegation have proposed changes to the H-2A program, notably allowing farmers to provide workers with vouchers to obtain housing nearby rather than being required to provide on-site housing.

Dawson Morton, a lawyer with the Georgia Legal Services Program, dismissed complaints about the guest worker program, arguing the real issue is farmers don't want to pay a legal wage or provide basic housing.

"The H-2A conditions are hardly extravagant," Morton said. "They're so modest that most Americans aren't willing to accept them."

Morton noted that a report by Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Gary Black showed that some farmers believe legal workers are more expensive and won't work as hard.

"Gary Black's report shows that there is an attempt by agriculture to shape policy to get themselves as cheap a labor force as possible," Morton said. "This doesn't look like an industry that's interested in complying with the law or that's interested in paying a legal wage."

Two of the biggest Vidalia farmers, Delbert Bland and R.T. Stanley, said they don't plan to reduce their crops.

Bland has used the federal guest worker program for years, and Stanley said he would likely request a crew of guest workers to supplement his other workers during the height of the harvest.

"I'm getting them planted all right," Stanley said. "But when it gets to be time to harvest them in April or May, I'm concerned."

Rather than reducing acreage, Kent Hamilton, who has vegetable farms near Tifton, Ga., plans to increase his sweet corn, cucumber and bell pepper crops by 15 percent because he thinks other growers will plant less.

Hamilton has used the federal guest worker program for years. He generally brings in about 400 temporary foreign workers but is building more housing to accommodate 515 this year.

Darvin Eason farms blackberries, cotton and peanuts in Lenox, deep in south Georgia.

Cotton and peanuts can be harvested mechanically, but blackberries must be picked by hand, requiring a lot of workers for a period of several weeks.

"If you don't pick them every day, you lose some. They start to fall on the ground," he said.

A relatively small-scale farmer, Eason's 4 acres of bushes produce about 50,000 pounds of berries a year. But having made a hefty investment in the bushes, he can't easily reduce his harvest this year. His labor contractor has already told him he'll likely have to pay higher wages this year because it's going to be tougher to find workers.


http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/nation/story/2012-01-20/georgia-alabama-farmers-immigration/52699204/1

gsprofval
by Silver Member on May. 29, 2013 at 11:28 PM
2 moms liked this

Around my area, a lot of teenagers work in the corn fields detasseling during summer.  Seems like kids would be willing to work in other kinds of fields for some spending money.

kailu1835
by Ruby Member on May. 30, 2013 at 2:53 AM
9 moms liked this
Glad to hear it. If all the states would stand up to the federal government, there will be nowhere for these criminals to hide.
Aestas
by Gold Member on May. 30, 2013 at 11:50 AM
22 moms liked this

This is pure jingoistic xenophobia, and it's not even factually sound. If undocumented workers were taking jobs from Americans who wanted them, I would still think it was xenophobic, but people who believe that kind of propaganda need to spend less time reading hateful opinion pieces and more time reading actual news. Undocumented immigrants make up an essential part of our economy; we literally could not afford for them to leave. Don't like it? Then take yourself to the library and give yourself a crash course on neoliberal economics, late capitalism, and world history, and then ask yourself what the real problem is (hint: it's not your impoverished neighbor who works 16 hours a day for far less than legal minimum wage so that you can have ready access to cheap produce and other essentials).

AlekD
by Gold Member on May. 30, 2013 at 11:52 AM
4 moms liked this
I stopped reading at "Barack Hussein Obama" can anyone give me a summary?
Della529
by on May. 30, 2013 at 12:04 PM
8 moms liked this

 I stopped at the word "farther". 

Quoting AlekD:

I stopped reading at "Barack Hussein Obama" can anyone give me a summary?

 

jaxTheMomm
by Platinum Member on May. 30, 2013 at 12:22 PM
5 moms liked this

I can tell you this much:  The source is a racist, white supremist website.  


Quoting AlekD:

I stopped reading at "Barack Hussein Obama" can anyone give me a summary?



jaxTheMomm
by Platinum Member on May. 30, 2013 at 12:25 PM
4 moms liked this

http://dir.alabama.gov/docs/pressreleases/uc_office%20of%20governor%20robert%20bentley.pdf

Industries gaining jobs were leisure and hospitality (+7,100), construction (+2,200), and professional and business services (+1,400), among others.

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)