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Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Feds drop 'morning-after pill' appeal, says it's ok for minors

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Feds drop 'morning-after pill' appeal

From Bill Mears, CNN
updated 7:44 AM EDT, Tue June 11, 2013
Watch this video

Plan B for all with no restrictions

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • NEW: Sen. Patty Murray, NARAL Pro-Choice America praise administration move
  • The FDA says it will allow over-the-counter sales of one-pill product
  • A federal judge in New York had ordered the drug be made available without restrictions
  • The Obama administration's appeal of that ruling was rebuffed last week

(CNN) -- The Obama administration will allow minors to obtain one form of the emergency contraception known as the "morning-after pill," dropping its appeal of a judge's order requiring it to be sold over the counter.

U.S. District Judge Edward Korman had ruled in April that the government must allow over-the-counter sales, and a federal appeals court rejected the administration's challenge to that ruling last week. The administration had been criticized by some women's rights groups for trying to stop contraception sales to underage females.

In a Monday letter to Korman, Justice Department attorneys said the Food and Drug Administration and the Department of Health and Human Services had agreed to make the single-pill version of the drug available "without age or point-of-sale restrictions."

"It is the government's understanding that this course of action fully complies with the Court's judgment in this action," the letter states. "Once the Court confirms that the government's understanding is correct, the government intends to file with the Circuit Court notice that it is voluntarily withdrawing its appeal in this matter."

Judge: Morning-after pill for all ages

The FDA has asked the maker of the single-pill emergency contraceptive known as Plan B One-Step to submit a new request for over-the-counter approval, the letter states. The agency "will approve it without delay" once filed.

But the FDA won't allow girls to obtain a two-pill version of the drug, saying there is less safety data available on the use of the product by younger adolescents.

The key ingredient in Plan B is the synthetic hormone levonorgestrel, which can prevent fertilization or prevent a fertilized egg from embedding in the uterus. Emergency contraceptives are intended for use within 72 hours after sex but are most effective if taken within 24 hours.

The FDA announced two years ago there would be no limits on over-the-counter sales of morning-after pills. But Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius unilaterally ordered the age and prescription restrictions, prompting lawsuits.

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Washington, praised the decision.

"After far too long of a delay, science has prevailed," said Murray, who called emergency contraception "an essential part of women's basic health care."

"Today's move by the administration means the safety and effectiveness of Plan B, not politics, will dictate access," she said.

And the abortion rights group NARAL Pro-Choice America said the decision "ends a nearly decade-long battle over lowering barriers to this important medication."

"Health experts like the American Academy of Pediatrics and many others agree that emergency contraception is safe and effective for women of all ages," Ilyse Hogue, president of the rights group, said in a statement hailing the move. "We're happy to see this long overdue victory for science over politics."

The move is likely to draw criticism from opponents of abortion rights, who had condemned Korman's April ruling.

Korman had criticized what he called "nonsensical" government rules that he said unfairly favored the single-pill version over the cheaper, generic two-pill version. Under current policies, prescriptions are still needed for the generic version for those under age 17.

Supporters of Korman's ruling called it a landmark decision, while opponents raised concerns about safeguards being eliminated.

The FDA said in May that it was changing its regulations, allowing sales by a private pharmaceutical firm, Teva Women's Health, to those 15 and over without a prescription. Only those 17 or older were previously allowed to buy the contraceptive.

Many developed countries require a prescription for oral contraceptives, including Canada and most of Europe. Other countries sell the pill without a prescription.


Neon Washable Paint

by on Jun. 11, 2013 at 8:02 AM
Replies (51-58):
JessT5280
by Member on Jun. 13, 2013 at 2:53 PM

I'm confused. You set out to be a statistic? 

I think what Woodbabe is trying to point out is that this will reduce the amount of people who end up using welfare programs, and statistically allow for higher incomes to be attained (feel free to correct me if I'm wrong). 

You say that in two years you are planning to have another child. What if you are still on food stamps? Will you still try and have another baby?  You do understand that there is a 42% likely hood that your children will grow up in poverty, right? 

Quoting pj2becca21:

I was able to finish high school. I tried doing were I went to school every day sat in the classroom all day long, but mydaughter was being raised by her grandmother. were i live there is a program for student were they can do there school at home and come in a take a test for that whole class once a week. I hoped on that and grades went through the roof. 

college yeah i went for 2 years and got the degree I wanted. do I want to go back and get my master or BA. No. 

I understand the statisic, but from DAY 1 that is what I set out to bet 

Quoting Woodbabe:

Were you able to finish high school and go on to college? While there are always exceptions and success stories, unfortunately statistics prove otherwise:

http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/why-it-matters/pdf/poverty.pdf

Teen Pregnancy, Poverty, and Income Disparity

March 2010

Continuing to reduce teen pregnancy will help sustain the recent decreases in poverty, especially persistent child poverty. Poverty is a cause as well as a consequence of early childbearing, and some impoverished young mothers may end up faring poorly no matter when their children are born. Nevertheless, although disadvantaged backgrounds account for many of the burdens that young women shoulder, having a baby during adolescence only makes matters worse: 

Two-thirds of families begun by a young unmarried mother are poor.

Approximately one-quarter of teen mothers go on welfare within 3 years of the child’s birth.

Teen mothers are less likely to complete the education necessary to qualify for a well-paying job —only 38 

percent of mothers who have children before age 18 obtain a high school diploma.

In addition, other data indicate that less than two percent of mothers who have children before age 18 complete college by the age of 30 compared to nine percent of young women who wait until age 20 or 21 to have children.

This disparity in education, not surprisingly, tends to affect income level. In fact, over the past 20 years the median income for college graduates has increased 19 percent while the median income for high school dropouts has decreased 28 percent.

Virtually all of the increase in child poverty between 1980 and 1996 was related to the increase in nonmarital childbearing, and half of never-married mothers begin their childbearing as teens.

Nearly 80 percent of fathers of children born to teen mothers do not marry the mothers. These fathers pay 

less than $800 annually in child support, often because they are quite poor themselves.

Since child support can be an important source of income for poor children—accounting for 23 percent of the family income among those families who do receive child support—children born to young fathers are at further disadvantage.

Teen mothers are likely to have a second birth relatively soon—about one-fourth of teenage mothers have a second child within 24 months of the first birth—which can further impede their ability to finish school or keep a job, and to escape poverty.

WHAT ARE THE CHANCES?

What are the chances of a child growing up in poverty if: (1) the mother gave birth as a teen, (2) the parents were unmarried when the child was born, and (3) the mother did not receive a high school diploma or GED?

27% if one of these things happen

42% if two of these things happen

64% if three of these things happen

Only 7% if none of these things happen

Put another way, if these three things happen, a child’s chance of growing up in poverty is 9 times greater than if none of these things happen.


Quoting pj2becca21:

I agree with on reducing it and i disagree with you because I know some amazing teen mom who yes are single moms but are not on PA and staid in school got there diplomas and now have college degree and work there but off. 

I'm one them. Minis the single mom part. I work from home and my hubby works but bills and gas help our money run out, so yes we are on food stamps. I only have one child and in 2 years when she turns 7 ( omg that is weird to write) we are plan on working on my second my hubby's and I's first. we have worked very hard to get to were we are. 

Now saying that, I know for a fact that some girls should not have children at 16 (or ever) but you know what not all are bad. but the ones that are Ruin the rest of us. 

Quoting Woodbabe:

Good. Reducing unwanted pregnancy reduces poverty rates and hopefully the rates of single mothers. That means fewer babies on welfare, food stamps and medicaid. Let's hope these girls stay in school and make something more for themselves...





pj2becca21
by Bronze Member on Jun. 13, 2013 at 2:57 PM

there is another post were some one asked me that. 

"beat"I forgot the A 

If were are not able to get off then No we will wait and try later. 42% of all children right now live in poverty. 

Quoting JessT5280:

I'm confused. You set out to be a statistic? 

I think what Woodbabe is trying to point out is that this will reduce the amount of people who end up using welfare programs, and statistically allow for higher incomes to be attained (feel free to correct me if I'm wrong). 

You say that in two years you are planning to have another child. What if you are still on food stamps? Will you still try and have another baby?  You do understand that there is a 42% likely hood that your children will grow up in poverty, right? 

Quoting pj2becca21:

I was able to finish high school. I tried doing were I went to school every day sat in the classroom all day long, but mydaughter was being raised by her grandmother. were i live there is a program for student were they can do there school at home and come in a take a test for that whole class once a week. I hoped on that and grades went through the roof. 

college yeah i went for 2 years and got the degree I wanted. do I want to go back and get my master or BA. No. 

I understand the statisic, but from DAY 1 that is what I set out to bet 

Quoting Woodbabe:

Were you able to finish high school and go on to college? While there are always exceptions and success stories, unfortunately statistics prove otherwise:

http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/why-it-matters/pdf/poverty.pdf

Teen Pregnancy, Poverty, and Income Disparity

March 2010

Continuing to reduce teen pregnancy will help sustain the recent decreases in poverty, especially persistent child poverty. Poverty is a cause as well as a consequence of early childbearing, and some impoverished young mothers may end up faring poorly no matter when their children are born. Nevertheless, although disadvantaged backgrounds account for many of the burdens that young women shoulder, having a baby during adolescence only makes matters worse: 

Two-thirds of families begun by a young unmarried mother are poor.

Approximately one-quarter of teen mothers go on welfare within 3 years of the child’s birth.

Teen mothers are less likely to complete the education necessary to qualify for a well-paying job —only 38 

percent of mothers who have children before age 18 obtain a high school diploma.

In addition, other data indicate that less than two percent of mothers who have children before age 18 complete college by the age of 30 compared to nine percent of young women who wait until age 20 or 21 to have children.

This disparity in education, not surprisingly, tends to affect income level. In fact, over the past 20 years the median income for college graduates has increased 19 percent while the median income for high school dropouts has decreased 28 percent.

Virtually all of the increase in child poverty between 1980 and 1996 was related to the increase in nonmarital childbearing, and half of never-married mothers begin their childbearing as teens.

Nearly 80 percent of fathers of children born to teen mothers do not marry the mothers. These fathers pay 

less than $800 annually in child support, often because they are quite poor themselves.

Since child support can be an important source of income for poor children—accounting for 23 percent of the family income among those families who do receive child support—children born to young fathers are at further disadvantage.

Teen mothers are likely to have a second birth relatively soon—about one-fourth of teenage mothers have a second child within 24 months of the first birth—which can further impede their ability to finish school or keep a job, and to escape poverty.

WHAT ARE THE CHANCES?

What are the chances of a child growing up in poverty if: (1) the mother gave birth as a teen, (2) the parents were unmarried when the child was born, and (3) the mother did not receive a high school diploma or GED?

27% if one of these things happen

42% if two of these things happen

64% if three of these things happen

Only 7% if none of these things happen

Put another way, if these three things happen, a child’s chance of growing up in poverty is 9 times greater than if none of these things happen.


Quoting pj2becca21:

I agree with on reducing it and i disagree with you because I know some amazing teen mom who yes are single moms but are not on PA and staid in school got there diplomas and now have college degree and work there but off. 

I'm one them. Minis the single mom part. I work from home and my hubby works but bills and gas help our money run out, so yes we are on food stamps. I only have one child and in 2 years when she turns 7 ( omg that is weird to write) we are plan on working on my second my hubby's and I's first. we have worked very hard to get to were we are. 

Now saying that, I know for a fact that some girls should not have children at 16 (or ever) but you know what not all are bad. but the ones that are Ruin the rest of us. 

Quoting Woodbabe:

Good. Reducing unwanted pregnancy reduces poverty rates and hopefully the rates of single mothers. That means fewer babies on welfare, food stamps and medicaid. Let's hope these girls stay in school and make something more for themselves...






illogicalkat
by Bronze Member on Jun. 13, 2013 at 4:53 PM

Plan B needs to be taken within 72 hours of unprotected intercourse, to prevent pregnancy from occuring. To what possible underlying medical conditions are you referring, and how would they affect the prescription of emergency contraception?


Quoting OHgirlinCA:

 I really don't agree with this.  Plan B should only be prescribed after any possible underlying medical conditions are ruled out. 



snookyfritz
by Platinum Member on Jun. 13, 2013 at 5:02 PM

Given the side effects of hormonal BC and the many drug interactions, the actions of  Ms Sebelius are irresponsible.  A teenage girl who buys this method of BC certainly isn't going to inform an adult.  One who can discern whether any future pain or infection could be associated with the pill.  Considering that a minor can't get her ears pierced without permission.  Very irresponsible

OHgirlinCA
by Platinum Member on Jun. 13, 2013 at 5:08 PM

 I do know what Plan B is and why it needs to be taken when it does and for what purpose... thank you very much.  Perhaps the following will explain to you why a doctor should be consulted before taking it.

Do NOT use Plan B if:

  • you are allergic to any ingredient in Plan B
  • you are or suspect that you are pregnant
  • you have abnormal vaginal bleeding
  • you are taking nevirapine, rifampin, or St. John's wort
  • you have had a stroke or history of bleeding of the brain, known or suspected breast cancer, or a blood clotting disorder

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Before using Plan B:

Some medical conditions may interact with Plan B. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any medical conditions, especially if any of the following apply to you:

  • if you are planning to become pregnant or are breast-feeding
  • if you are taking any prescription or nonprescription medicine, herbal preparation, or dietary supplement
  • if you have allergies to medicines, foods, or other substances
  • if you have a history of ectopic pregnancy or you are premenstrual
  • if you have diabetes

Some MEDICINES MAY INTERACT with Plan B. Tell your health care provider if you are taking any other medicines, especially any of the following:

  • Antifungals (eg, ketoconazole), aprepitant, barbiturates (eg, phenobarbital), bosentan, carbamazepine, felbamate, griseofulvin, HIV protease inhibitors (eg, indinavir), hydantoins (eg, phenytoin), modafinil, nevirapine, oxcarbazepine, penicillins (eg, amoxicillin), rifampin, rufinamide, St. John's wort, tetracyclines (eg, doxycycline), topiramate, or troglitazone because they may decrease Plan B's effectiveness
  • Anticoagulants (eg, warfarin) because their actions and the risk of their side effects may be increased or decreased by Plan B
  • Beta-adrenergic blockers (eg, metoprolol), corticosteroids (eg, prednisone), selegiline, theophylline, or troleandomycin because their actions and the risk of their side effects may be increased by Plan B
  • Lamotrigine because its effectiveness is decreased, and when levonorgestrel is stopped, toxic effects, such as nausea, dizziness, and vision problems may occur
  • Valproic acid because its effectiveness may be decreased by Plan B.

This may not be a complete list of all interactions that may occur. Ask your health care provider if Plan B may interact with other medicines that you take. Check with your health care provider before you start, stop, or change the dose of any medicine.


Quoting illogicalkat:

Plan B needs to be taken within 72 hours of unprotected intercourse, to prevent pregnancy from occuring. To what possible underlying medical conditions are you referring, and how would they affect the prescription of emergency contraception?

 

Quoting OHgirlinCA:

 I really don't agree with this.  Plan B should only be prescribed after any possible underlying medical conditions are ruled out. 

 

 

 

PinkButterfly66
by Silver Member on Jun. 13, 2013 at 5:13 PM

Now if they will force the price to drop from $50, to about $10 to make it within the price reach of all teens who need it.

NWP
by guerrilla girl on Jun. 13, 2013 at 5:27 PM

I think this is an excellent point concerning the availability. With this price, I do not see this being used as a primary BC method.

Quoting PinkButterfly66:

Now if they will force the price to drop from $50, to about $10 to make it within the price reach of all teens who need it.


Neon Washable Paint

pansyprincess
by Silver Member on Jun. 14, 2013 at 9:54 AM

Your logic makes no sense.  If someone is raping a 12 year old, they can go buy that pill today and force them to take it.  That can happen today.  It has nothing to do with this new legislation.  This legislation allows a person to buy the pill for themselves.  Why is it all about 12 year olds?  There is no age restriction on it ... just like there isn't on aspirin.

12 year olds SHOULDN'T need this.  But some might.


Quoting ElitestJen:



Quoting illogicalkat:

And you would prefer the 12 year old to be pregnant, and now have a child, and have two lives ruined instead of just one?

To my mind, that is beyond sick.


Quoting ElitestJen:



Quoting illogicalkat:

Because a 12-year-old girl who is raped every night will be protected somehow by having a baby? Is that really how you intend to sound?

Well, a pregnant 12yo is sure to raise the eyebrow of anyone who sees her.  Based on her age, it should be assumed she's being victimized.  Many times, these girls are so frightened, they won't identify their abuser. However, a child is a living DNA sample of both his parents.  The perp would stand a higher chance of being caught.




Why would two lives be ruined?  Why couldn't the child be placed with a family member or for adoption?

To me, it is sick to make a morning after pill available to a 12 year old.

And frankly, I would prefer the 12 year old to not even have to worry about any of this.  Since the FDA brought it up and decided that 12yos need access, apparently, they do.  Rather than go after the underlying reasons, we'll just pump them full of hormones. 



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