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Cancer-Stricken 63-Year-Old Lego-Fanatic Denied Admission to LegoLand Without a Kid

Posted by on Jul. 9, 2013 at 1:47 PM
  • 34 Replies


Cancer-Stricken 63-Year-Old Lego-Fanatic Denied Admission to LegoLand Without a Kid

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A 63-year-old Canadian man traveled more than 200 miles to Toronto to fulfill a lifelong dream of visiting the Legoland Discovery Centre only to be turned away by a rule that prohibits adults from entering without a child. John St-Onge of Windsor, Ont., says he feels discriminated against and embarrassed after he and his daughter, Nicole St-Onge, saved up to make the 3-hour trip.

A retired custodian from a steel plant, John suffers from cancer, diabetes and recently had heart surgery, according to CTVNews.ca. Because he is unable to travel to the Legoland flagship in Denmark, he thought the Toronto location would be more realistic.

St-Onge spends his winters indoors because of his health and keeps busy with Lego projects. A fan of Lego since his children were born, St-Onge continued to break down and rebuild their Lego sets long after they were grown. He now has about 75 sets comprised of 50,000 Lego pieces.

“It’s a Lego House,” he joked to CTVNews.ca.

"They wouldn't let us go in and so we asked to see a manager," Nicole said. "Five minutes later, the employee came back and said the manager was too busy to see us, but that was their policy, they weren't allowed in without a child and there was nothing they could do about it."

Sadly, they headed back to Windsor.

"It made me feel awful," St-Onge said. "I felt discriminated against. I thought what the heck is the reason for this? If they gave me a reason maybe I could understand but they gave me no reason."

"I was crushed," Nicole said. "My dad is 63 years old, he was devastated. The look on his face was like a child not getting the gift at Christmas that they want. He felt discriminated against because he's a senior citizen who also happens to like Lego."

Lara Hannaford, marketing manager at the Vaughan Mills Legoland, said it was unfortunate that they were unable to see a manager, but that the rule is posted on flyers and at locations

Hannaford explained the rule was put in place because "it is a child attraction so we do have this in place to protect the families and children that visit."

She said adult-only nights are held at Legoland once a month.

 

Sources: CTVNews.ca, MSN Now

by on Jul. 9, 2013 at 1:47 PM
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Replies (1-10):
anxiousschk
by anxiouss on Jul. 9, 2013 at 1:49 PM

WTF?  You can't come in without a kid?  SUCH bs.  

FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Jul. 9, 2013 at 2:21 PM
1 mom liked this

I don't agree with the rule but he should have done his homework prior to.  He could planned his trip on one of the adult only nights.

His disabilities, while sad, should have nothing to do with this.

Rhiannon1980
by Bronze Member on Jul. 9, 2013 at 2:26 PM

 They have an adult night once a month he sould of gone then. Rules are rules yes him being sick is sad he still needs to fallow them.

texassahm
by Bronze Member on Jul. 9, 2013 at 2:39 PM
3 moms liked this

If they have "Adult-only nights at Legoland once a month" then that should be more widely advertised.

If I had the money, I would pay for him and his daughter to go back and visit and I would meet him there so he could go inside with my family.

Legoland are jerks!  Special circumstances should've been allowed.  If I'm the manager, I find out who his doctors are, confirm his health status and once confirmed, I assign an employee to escort him through the facility on a personalized guided tour.  

Sad that the Legoland manager has no problem-solving skills.

KelliansMom
by Bronze Member on Jul. 9, 2013 at 2:41 PM
This is true. It is stated on their sign (at least at the one here in atl) and the do advertise their adult only nights too via Facebook and their website. The manager should have made time to talk to him about it all but that's their rule
rgba
by Bronze Member on Jul. 9, 2013 at 2:41 PM
1 mom liked this
I agree.


Quoting texassahm:

If they have "Adult-only nights at Legoland once a month" then that should be more widely advertised.

If I had the money, I would pay for him and his daughter to go back and visit and I would meet him there so he could go inside with my family.

Legoland are jerks!  Special circumstances should've been allowed.  If I'm the manager, I find out who his doctors are, confirm his health status and once confirmed, I assign an employee to escort him through the facility on a personalized guided tour.  

Sad that the Legoland manager has no problem-solving skills.


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malibucj
by Member on Jul. 9, 2013 at 2:42 PM

I feel bad for him with his cancer and all . But he should've done his research first.

UpSheRises
by Platinum Member on Jul. 9, 2013 at 2:45 PM

I agree with you. I think its really sad...i feel terrible that it happened to him but i don't have any problem with the policy or with their aderance to it. If he would have been a creeper and something bad happened we'd all be singing a different tune.


Quoting FromAtoZ:

I don't agree with the rule but he should have done his homework prior to.  He could planned his trip on one of the adult only nights.

His disabilities, while sad, should have nothing to do with this.


 

TranquilMind
by Platinum Member on Jul. 9, 2013 at 2:46 PM
1 mom liked this

 Oh for goodness sakes.  It's a stupid policy, but had he simply stood outside and talked to a Mom or two, someone would have brought him in with their kids.  I know I would do it, if someone told me this and asked to enter with our family.

 

texassahm
by Bronze Member on Jul. 9, 2013 at 3:00 PM
2 moms liked this

It was a mistake made by a sick man - seems like he has other things on his mind other than finding out if Legoland has a specific policy against adults with no kids.

IF LEGOLAND MANAGERS WERE SMART - They would've done what I suggested.  Verify his health status and given him special consideration based on his illness and his distance of travel then USED this incident to their benefit to highly publicize their facility AND their policy of no adults without kids.

Legoland helps this man in an isolated incident, Legoland gets to use the incident in the news to freely publicize their adult-only nights AND they get to look like the "good guy."  

Where are the people running the show?  Does no one have any problem-solving skills?  Surely Legoland has a publicist or a marketing department...but at minimum you'd think they would have managers who know how to manage all types of situations....

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