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Who's at fault?

Posted by on Jul. 10, 2013 at 9:08 AM
  • 26 Replies

A nonprofit organization does a big event every year...black tie, celebrity guests, that kind of thing. A Save-The-Date postcard was designed be a marketing company (pro bono) and printed by a printing company then addressed, stamped, and mailed by the organization. For talking purposes we'll say the postage cost $1000. 

Well, the cardstock was too thick & the postcards were too big and they got jammed up in the sorting machines so about 75% of the post cards were returned as undeliverable.

People have to be invited to they've gotta be re-sent. Do you think any one party is more at fault for this mishap than another?

by on Jul. 10, 2013 at 9:08 AM
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Replies (1-10):
rgba
by Bronze Member on Jul. 10, 2013 at 9:10 AM
2 moms liked this
Whoever picked the cardstock
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
stacymomof2
by Ruby Member on Jul. 10, 2013 at 9:13 AM
I think the marketing company would have to go down as the responsible party. The printer should have known better but at my job the marketing department would have had to follow up with them to the point of specifying the paper and envelopes for issues like this.
yourspecialkid
by Platinum Member on Jul. 10, 2013 at 9:14 AM

 I would think the printer would know about postcard size.  But I agree with rgba ^^.

Bieg9093
by Bronze Member on Jul. 10, 2013 at 9:27 AM
2 moms liked this

 The post office is at fault.  If the machine can't figure out what to do with a postcard, then a real person ought to shuffle out and handle it.  It's just as much work to return them to sender as it is to deliver them properly.

Then again, I have to wonder if the printer unloaded this cardstock on the pro bono job because they've encountered this hiccup before? 

UpSheRises
by Platinum Member on Jul. 10, 2013 at 9:30 AM

 


Quoting Bieg9093:

 The post office is at fault.  If the machine can't figure out what to do with a postcard, then a real person ought to shuffle out and handle it.  It's just as much work to return them to sender as it is to deliver them properly.

Then again, I have to wonder if the printer unloaded this cardstock on the pro bono job because they've encountered this hiccup before? 

The printing was paid, just the graphic design wasn't. It was two different companies...a marketer and a printer.

 

snookyfritz
by Platinum Member on Jul. 10, 2013 at 9:32 AM

I think it's not a good idea to place blame in a situation like this.  The printing company should know the correct bulk of a postcard, so if anyone, I'd hold them accountable.  At the risk of losing their support in the future...that is.

Bieg9093
by Bronze Member on Jul. 10, 2013 at 9:37 AM

 

Quoting UpSheRises:

 

 

Quoting Bieg9093:

 The post office is at fault.  If the machine can't figure out what to do with a postcard, then a real person ought to shuffle out and handle it.  It's just as much work to return them to sender as it is to deliver them properly.

Then again, I have to wonder if the printer unloaded this cardstock on the pro bono job because they've encountered this hiccup before? 

The printing was paid, just the graphic design wasn't. It was two different companies...a marketer and a printer.

 

 Ah.  Were the postcards noticibly larger/thicker than a typical postcard?  Did the designer do anything weird with the design?  Like appliques of something?

momtoscott
by Platinum Member on Jul. 10, 2013 at 9:44 AM
1 mom liked this

Printing company's mistake is biggest, IMO, for using the wrong card stock and size--this is info that a printer should know.   The marketing company is second in responsibility, because it should also know how to format a design order involving a mailing piece. 

stormcris
by Christy on Jul. 10, 2013 at 9:45 AM
1 mom liked this

If they were undelivered for a reason other than the postage was not the correct amount then the post office is at fault and normally they would hand sort and send them. If the postage was not correct then the person who did the postage was at fault. It is rather curious that they would spend this money for a mark the date notice as email would have been more prudent and then more money could have gone for charity rather than overhead. Many people are starting to notice these uses of charity dollars.

kaylamom2004
by Bronze Member on Jul. 10, 2013 at 12:27 PM

No. Learning experience.

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