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Spin off Spaying is not necessary to be a responsible dog owner

Posted by on Jul. 10, 2013 at 8:16 PM
  • 79 Replies
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My dog will be 8 and has never had contact with a male.  It is not necessary to spay in order to be responsible.

How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


by on Jul. 10, 2013 at 8:16 PM
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yourspecialkid
by Platinum Member on Jul. 10, 2013 at 8:18 PM
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 I will agree except say that I have a male and he is not neutered.  He has never even had an opportunity to be a father.

SunshneDaydream
by Silver Member on Jul. 10, 2013 at 8:20 PM

I would agree, except for something I saw in another post...maybe it was the one that this one is spinning off of?  Someone asked if it was cruel to deny the mating instinct to a dog.  I suppose this would only apply to males, but an intact male has a strong desire to mate and is it cruel and unnatural to prevent him from ever fulfilling that instinct?  

Peanutx3
by on Jul. 10, 2013 at 8:22 PM
My female dog is not spayed my only concern is her potential exposure to coyotes.
Thibmom
by Member on Jul. 10, 2013 at 8:25 PM
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Actually, just because your dog has never mated doesn't mean that her not being spayed doesn't pose any risks. Have you ever heard of pyometra? I had a patient come in today, wasn't spayed, never had contact with any males, is lactating and experiencing a "phantom pregnancy". The lactating can cause infection in her mammary glands and she's high risk for a pyrometra infection. I would rather spend $200 to spay and neuter my animals than $1000's + more down the road to save their lives from preventable diseases.
Thibmom
by Member on Jul. 10, 2013 at 8:27 PM
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Not saying anyone is a bad or irresponsible owner for not spay or neutering. Just know the risks. And unfortunately, I see those risks a lot in unaltered animals.
katy_kay08
by on Jul. 10, 2013 at 8:43 PM
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I learned that female dogs that are not spayed run a greater risk of growing tumors in the mammary glands and spaying them reduces that risk.  

Thibmom
by Member on Jul. 10, 2013 at 8:46 PM
This is also another risk when an animal is not spayed.

Quoting katy_kay08:

I learned that female dogs that are not spayed run a greater risk of growing tumors in the mammary glands and spaying them reduces that risk.  

Linus77
by Member on Jul. 10, 2013 at 8:56 PM
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There are other benefits to spaying/neutering.

Your female pet will live a longer, healthier life.
Spaying helps prevent uterine infections and breast cancer, which is fatal in about 50 percent of dogs and 90 percent of cats. Spaying your pet before her first heat offers the best protection from these diseases.

Neutering provides major health benefits for your male.
Besides preventing unwanted litters, neutering your male companion prevents testicular cancer, if done before six months of age.

Your spayed female won't go into heat.
While cycles can vary, female felines usually go into heat four to five days every three weeks during breeding season. In an effort to advertise for mates, they'll yowl and urinate more frequently—sometimes all over the house!

Your male dog won't want to roam away from home.
An intact male will do just about anything to find a mate! That includes digging his way under the fence and making like Houdini to escape from the house. And once he's free to roam, he risks injury in traffic and fights with other males.

Your neutered male will be much better behaved.
Neutered cats and dogs focus their attention on their human families. On the other hand, unneutered dogs and cats may mark their territory by spraying strong-smelling urine all over the house. Many aggression problems can be avoided by early neutering.

http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/top-10-reasons-spay-or-neuter-your-pet

Edited:  I have a kitty that I waited two years before spaying.  When I finally got her in, they opened her up and found that her uterus was infected somehow and full of pus.  Had I waited a day or two, it would have ruptured and killed her....then charged me $100 more for an emergency operation...  :-(

UpSheRises
by Platinum Member on Jul. 10, 2013 at 9:02 PM
1 mom liked this
Fixing has nothing to do with being a responsible pet owner.
Aestas
by Gold Member on Jul. 10, 2013 at 9:05 PM

I don't think most pet owners who don't spay/neuter are as responsible as you are, if you're making absolutely sure she can't be with a male, ever.

Still, there's always a small chance they could get out. It only takes once. My thinking is, better safe than sorry.

I have a cat who had kittens recently, but she was halfway through her pregnancy when we adopted her (surprise!). Mama and kittens will all be fixed as soon as kittens are old enough. All my other pets are fixed.

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