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Another Reason Why Zero Tolerance Policies are Ruining Kids' Lives

Posted by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 11:53 AM
  • 21 Replies

What an eye-opener! This article is by Susan Ferriss, and published by www.publicintegrity.org.

You've got to read it to believe it. It's Zero Tolerance at its ugly worst. We're creating a generation of young people who were told they can't have a second chance. These kids are sentenced to a bad education after a single infraction at school, even if there were no witnesses. Sometimes for just trying to defend themselves. It's one strike and you're out. And it's devastating families. 

http://www.publicintegrity.org/2013/07/15/12951/throwaway-kids-disciplined-california-teens-struggle-school-themselves?utm_source=email&utm_campaign=watchdog&utm_medium=publici-email

Throwaway kids: disciplined California teens struggle to school themselves

Strict district policies, distance from alternatives leave some no option but 'independent study'


by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 11:53 AM
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Replies (1-10):
stormcris
by Christy on Jul. 16, 2013 at 12:08 PM

I think it is sad. It should also be an eyeopener to people that school is not a right. Some people might suggest he should participate online but in some states if you are expelled the do not accept you into any school except the few that are for behavioral problem which are not online. In some such schools, you are associated with other behavioral problems and treats school like a prison environment.

MentorMom1
by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 1:46 PM

Why have we allowed this to happen? I know when I tried to get involved in my kids' schools, and had an opinion about the curriculum and various programs, I was told to butt out. I got handed a pile of hoo-ha. about how they knew what was right for THEIR students. I did three years of research on education reform until I got so depressed my DH told me to stop. It's funny now, but what I learned would curl your hair.

 I was eventually told by a high-up administrator that I would be better off if I taught my kids myself. See, the bureaucracy has all the time - and a lot of the money - they need to keep people in positions to make sure they succeed. Parents usually care only for the time their kids are in school - and they burn out. They can't get to every meeting because they need sitters, they work, or can't find the damn place because the meeting was purposely switched. Parents are fighting an uphill battle.






Quoting stormcris:

I think it is sad. It should also be an eyeopener to people that school is not a right. Some people might suggest he should participate online but in some states if you are expelled the do not accept you into any school except the few that are for behavioral problem which are not online. In some such schools, you are associated with other behavioral problems and treats school like a prison environment.



stormcris
by Christy on Jul. 16, 2013 at 1:53 PM

I agree with everything you mentioned. It has become some strange form that is to benefit the bureaucracy rather than the students in many schools. We tried to unseat our school board about a year or more ago (maybe a bit longer I am terrible with time frames) and they managed to prevent it even when we had a court hearing over it. It is hard to enact change in several systems.

Quoting MentorMom1:

Why have we allowed this to happen? I know when I tried to get involved in my kids' schools, and had an opinion about the curriculum and various programs, I was told to butt out. I got handed a pile of hoo-ha. about how they knew what was right for THEIR students. I did three years of research on education reform until I got so depressed my DH told me to stop. It's funny now, but what I learned would curl your hair.

 I was eventually told by a high-up administrator that I would be better off if I taught my kids myself. See, the bureaucracy has all the time - and a lot of the money - they need to keep people in positions to make sure they succeed. Parents usually care only for the time their kids are in school - and they burn out. They can't get to every meeting because they need sitters, they work, or can't find the damn place because the meeting was purposely switched. Parents are fighting an uphill battle.






Quoting stormcris:

I think it is sad. It should also be an eyeopener to people that school is not a right. Some people might suggest he should participate online but in some states if you are expelled the do not accept you into any school except the few that are for behavioral problem which are not online. In some such schools, you are associated with other behavioral problems and treats school like a prison environment.




UpSheRises
by Platinum Member on Jul. 16, 2013 at 2:03 PM

That's why i felt strongly that public education was not an option for my child. I am entitled to be more than an observer of my child's education. Sure, it's over 30% of our income...more than or mortgage...but i wasn't comfortable throwing him to the wolves and hoping for the best. It's a huge struggle for us an i'm not sure how we'll cope when DS gets to high school, tuition goes up $10,000 and we have to shell out for books but it is what it is.  

Quoting MentorMom1:

Why have we allowed this to happen? I know when I tried to get involved in my kids' schools, and had an opinion about the curriculum and various programs, I was told to butt out. I got handed a pile of hoo-ha. about how they knew what was right for THEIR students. I did three years of research on education reform until I got so depressed my DH told me to stop. It's funny now, but what I learned would curl your hair.

 I was eventually told by a high-up administrator that I would be better off if I taught my kids myself. See, the bureaucracy has all the time - and a lot of the money - they need to keep people in positions to make sure they succeed. Parents usually care only for the time their kids are in school - and they burn out. They can't get to every meeting because they need sitters, they work, or can't find the damn place because the meeting was purposely switched. Parents are fighting an uphill battle.

 

 

 

 

 

Quoting stormcris:

I think it is sad. It should also be an eyeopener to people that school is not a right. Some people might suggest he should participate online but in some states if you are expelled the do not accept you into any school except the few that are for behavioral problem which are not online. In some such schools, you are associated with other behavioral problems and treats school like a prison environment.

 

 


 

futureshock
by Ruby Member on Jul. 16, 2013 at 2:05 PM
2 moms liked this

This zero tolerance policy seems lazy, like school officials cannot be bothered to really look into each incident.

enlightened_24
by Member on Jul. 16, 2013 at 2:08 PM

My brother was a brown belt in karate-one fight away from geting his black belt. He was jumped outside the freaking principles office. He didnt fight back but blocked his opponent and once free he left. They were BOTH suspended for 3 days.

parentalrights1
by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 2:19 PM
T reminds me of the bullying issue where parents want zero tolerance for them and to expel them so their parents will have to teach them better

As a bully victim myself it sounds wonderful, but also as a bully victim, I know the victims get pegged as bullies all the time. It often felt like I would be punished for being the victim and the bully would get off Scott free. Sometimes the bullies would bully and harass me and then make false reports or go to their parents and say how I was doing all these mean things to them. Sometimes I would fight back and they would report everything I'd say or do to their parents while leaving out their part in everything

I definitely think of there was no tolerance when I was in school that I would have suffered unjustly and bullies would go free
I also think that every person on this planet has bullied someone to some extent at least once in their lives. I find the biggest bullies usually believe they are not bullies or that the victims had it coming "I'm not a bully. My friend just doesn't like that girl and they were arguing so I helped my friend!"

I really don't know how to handle the bullying issue
parentalrights1
by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 2:20 PM
1 mom liked this
I watched a girl just walk in the cafeteria and start hitting another one. The other girl just kept trying to walk away and she got suspended too


Quoting enlightened_24:

My brother was a brown belt in karate-one fight away from geting his black belt. He was jumped outside the freaking principles office. He didnt fight back but blocked his opponent and once free he left. They were BOTH suspended for 3 days.


parentalrights1
by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 2:23 PM
No they really can't.

Every time I had an issue with a bully every single principal I ever had just told us to get along or to ignore eachother

And a lot of people don't know what bullying is. You see it here all the time that people think everything is bullying. It's not that people think everything is bullying, it's that some people think. NOTHING is bullying. They call it hazing or teasing or whatever.

If you're picking on someone else then your a damn bully even if you were joking.


Quoting futureshock:

This zero tolerance policy seems lazy, like school officials cannot be bothered to really look into each incident.


MentorMom1
by on Jul. 16, 2013 at 2:42 PM

I clicked on "like" because I agree with you. Not because it was a good thing that happened. This is what is so wrong with school discipline. What happened, back in the early 1990s, was a paradigm shift. Due to education reform models being instituted,  no longer were facts important. That affected discipline policy as well as academics. 

Right and wrong no longer mattered. Teachers were not to judge. And so if a fight started, both children had to take responsibility for their part in it. That leaves a huge question as to who was right and who was wrong - but that was no longer the teacher's responsibiity. Everything was supposed to be equal. If kids used bad language, teachers couldn't say, "That's wrong." They had to say, "We don't use that language here."

There's a big difference. Same thing with grading. Group projects? Fine. Everyone gets the same grade. Forget the kid who does all the work. 

This is a pervasive change in values in this country. And it happened while we were sleeping.

 School supplies? Dump them all into communal bins. They don't belong to anyone. The individual student no longer really mattered. The emphasis was going to be on the group. 

So what if kids' lives are ruined. The one whose parents have money will send them to private school. The other one doesn't matter.



Quoting parentalrights1:

I watched a girl just walk in the cafeteria and start hitting another one. The other girl just kept trying to walk away and she got suspended too


Quoting enlightened_24:

My brother was a brown belt in karate-one fight away from geting his black belt. He was jumped outside the freaking principles office. He didnt fight back but blocked his opponent and once free he left. They were BOTH suspended for 3 days.




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