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Is obesity really a disease? ETA article

Posted by on Jul. 17, 2013 at 2:29 PM
  • 22 Replies

 Forgive I don't have an article for this but my boss was telling me that they have decided to add obesity in the DSMV (whatever volume we are on now) as a legit disease. Is Alcoholism a disease in your opinion?

 

AMA declares obesity a disease

The move by the American Medical Assn. board means that one-third of adults and 17% of children in the U.S. have a medical condition that requires treatment.

June 18, 2013|By Melissa Healy and Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
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  • The American Medical Assn. voted Tuesday to classify obesity as a disease, a decision that should prompt doctors to get more aggressive about helping patients maintain a healthy weight.
The American Medical Assn. voted Tuesday to classify obesity as a disease,… (AFP PHOTO/RONALDO SCHEMIDT )

The American Medical Assn. voted Tuesday to declare obesity a disease, a move that effectively defines 78 million American adults and 12 million children as having a medical condition requiring treatment.

The nation's leading physicians organization took the vote after debating whether the action would do more to help affected patients get useful treatment or would further stigmatize a condition with many causes and few easy fixes.

by on Jul. 17, 2013 at 2:29 PM
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FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Jul. 17, 2013 at 2:31 PM
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In my opinion, both begin as choices made that can lead to an array of diseases.  Some are able to get a handle on both, some are not.  Some need assistance while others do not.



UpSheRises
by Platinum Member on Jul. 17, 2013 at 2:31 PM
2 moms liked this

A disease is an abnormal condition that affects the body of an organism. It is often construed as a medical condition associated with specific symptoms and signs.[

Seems like it fits the definition to a T. Addiction is a disease as well.

LNLMommy
by Queen K on Jul. 17, 2013 at 2:34 PM
1 mom liked this

 I guess I will answer my own post! LOL. I am not sure what side of the argument I fall on. I feel that labeling something as a disease creates a dependency. The obese person or the alcoholic now have a crutch to fall back on when they relapse or fail to really put forth effort to change the behavior. I do believe that addictive personalities contribute to obesity and alcohol/drug use and perhaps that is where treatment would be more successful.

stormcris
by Christy on Jul. 17, 2013 at 2:37 PM

Since we see it as abnormal; yes, it is by one definition. However, by another definition unless it prevents normal function it is not which would leave some being a disease and others not.

Until they find a better measure I think we should focus on health of the individual not some number that may not be accurate. Is the person nutritionally healthy? Does the person have a deficit in their bodies such as magnesium or other that is causing the problem? We need to know the underlying problems not just simply assign a diet because unless the diet is correct for the specific needs and issue with the person it isn't going to change much and may in fact do harm. I am thankful to see more doctors are looking into underlying problems in my area rather than just randomly assign a diagnosis and prescription. I hope this change came down from the AMA.


GLWerth
by Gina on Jul. 17, 2013 at 2:49 PM
3 moms liked this

Making it an official disease makes it easier for pharmaceutical companies to make ever higher profits on various dangerous "anti-obesity" drugs.

It also allows for companies that make dangerous stomach restriction devices to make even higher profits as this stuff can be covered by insurance.

It isn't about health, it is about profit.

The best indicator of longevity and good health is regular vigorous exercise, not a decrease in body weight.

A loss of 10% of body weight will generally significantly improve health markers (blood pressure, blood sugar, etc.) and yet, for some, this 10% loss will still leave them fatter than society wants to see. 

I've lost 50 plus pounds in the past year or so.

When I went to the doctor for a check up recently, even with my blood pressure at 105/55, my blood sugar at the low end of normal, my cholesterol levels all smack in the middle of normal, resting pulse rate 55 (yeah, it should be lower), and my report that I exercise 5 days a week, with a combo of cardio and heavy lifting, he told me that I should consider a "lap band". 

I refused, citing that regular exercise is a better indicator of longevity and that my health is good, with the exception of sinus infections every fall/winter. He seemed quite confused and assured me that with new rules, insurance would cover most of it.

He then offered me a prescription for appetite suppressants.

It isn't about health. It is about profit.

Oh, and I'm not going back to that doctor.

LNLMommy
by Queen K on Jul. 17, 2013 at 2:54 PM

 That's a really good point that I hadn't considered. All these weight loss products are big business for companies!

Quoting GLWerth:

Making it an official disease makes it easier for pharmaceutical companies to make ever higher profits on various dangerous "anti-obesity" drugs.

It also allows for companies that make dangerous stomach restriction devices to make even higher profits as this stuff can be covered by insurance.

It isn't about health, it is about profit.

The best indicator of longevity and good health is regular vigorous exercise, not a decrease in body weight.

A loss of 10% of body weight will generally significantly improve health markers (blood pressure, blood sugar, etc.) and yet, for some, this 10% loss will still leave them fatter than society wants to see. 

I've lost 50 plus pounds in the past year or so.

When I went to the doctor for a check up recently, even with my blood pressure at 105/55, my blood sugar at the low end of normal, my cholesterol levels all smack in the middle of normal, resting pulse rate 55 (yeah, it should be lower), and my report that I exercise 5 days a week, with a combo of cardio and heavy lifting, he told me that I should consider a "lap band". 

I refused, citing that regular exercise is a better indicator of longevity and that my health is good, with the exception of sinus infections every fall/winter. He seemed quite confused and assured me that with new rules, insurance would cover most of it.

He then offered me a prescription for appetite suppressants.

It isn't about health. It is about profit.

Oh, and I'm not going back to that doctor.

 

rfurlongg
by on Jul. 17, 2013 at 2:57 PM

 Your boss is incorrect. Although it was seriously considered to be added to DSM V, ultimately it was not added in. If you (or anyone) is interested in reading the reasons behind its consideration and the boards ultimate decision to exclude obesity from the DSM check this journal:

http://www.healio.com/psychiatry/journals/PsycAnn/%7BF259FB28-070B-4D6F-B2B5-D8A46DEFE045%7D/Obesity-in-emDSM-5em  

LNLMommy
by Queen K on Jul. 17, 2013 at 3:03 PM

 Thank you for the info. so the AMA has decided one thing while the DSM V has decided another?

Quoting rfurlongg:

 Your boss is incorrect. Although it was seriously considered to be added to DSM V, ultimately it was not added in. If you (or anyone) is interested in reading the reasons behind its consideration and the boards ultimate decision to exclude obesity from the DSM check this journal:

http://www.healio.com/psychiatry/journals/PsycAnn/%7BF259FB28-070B-4D6F-B2B5-D8A46DEFE045%7D/Obesity-in-emDSM-5em  

 

rfurlongg
by on Jul. 17, 2013 at 3:11 PM

 The AMA is the American Medical Association, The DSM  is is compiled by the APA (specifically a board through the APA.) The APA is the American Psychiatric Association, so they focus more heavily on Mental Health. The AMA has the luxury or looking purely at physiology.

There is  a strong debate, substantiated by research, linking obesity to various mental health dx; hence the request for admission into the latest version of the DSM. I suspect it will eventually be added, although it will be many, many, years.

 

Quoting LNLMommy:

 Thank you for the info. so the AMA has decided one thing while the DSM V has decided another?

Quoting rfurlongg:

 Your boss is incorrect. Although it was seriously considered to be added to DSM V, ultimately it was not added in. If you (or anyone) is interested in reading the reasons behind its consideration and the boards ultimate decision to exclude obesity from the DSM check this journal:

http://www.healio.com/psychiatry/journals/PsycAnn/%7BF259FB28-070B-4D6F-B2B5-D8A46DEFE045%7D/Obesity-in-emDSM-5em  

 

 

Healthystart30
by Silver Member on Jul. 17, 2013 at 3:17 PM
1 mom liked this
Yes I think it can be, just like anorexia or other eating disorders, it's sometimes much more complicated then just "putting down the fork" but I hope we aren't just going to medicate instead of trying to get to the bottom of this problem.
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