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Why do they always find toxic waste in large developments?

Posted by on Jul. 18, 2013 at 11:25 PM
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When I was a kid Nesmith lake was a hip and happening spot.  Nice apartments, a nice beach, the canal beautiful homes.  In the early 80s the lake was closed due to what we were told was pcb contamination.  Not a big story and I felt the only reason it was mentioned in the papers was because our "Chilly Open" Golf tourn was held there and had to be moved. 

Our paper has been very quiet about it but I stumbled upon a facebook page tonight.  Here is a link to EPA document concerning the clean up:

http://www.epa.gov/superfund/sites/rods/fulltext/e0504693.pdf

And the facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Poison-in-the-Grapes/383544821735462?hc_location=stream


I swam in this lake a bit and have had family and friends live in the area.  The apartments arent so nice anymore but the surrounding neighborhood is very pretty.  I bet people buy homes there everyday without even knowing:(

How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


by on Jul. 18, 2013 at 11:25 PM
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WesternNYmom
by Silver Member on Jul. 18, 2013 at 11:58 PM

This reminds me of "Love Canal".   For anyone who isn't familar with "Love Canal", It is a neighborhood in the Lasalle district of Niagara Falls, NY.  Love Canal was made up about 9 streets. Back in the 60's people in this area started noticing that every time in rained strange chemicals would seep into their basements along with the rain water.  People were also becoming ill.  Tests were conducted and it was discovered that the neighborhood was built on land that was owned by the local chemical plants in the city. For years these factories were burying chemical waste in the ground. The land was sold to a private developer, who then foolishly (knowing full well that the chemicals where there) started digging holes for foundations. People then purchased the homes and sent their children to the nearby elementary school unaware that they were slowly being poisioned. What resulted was a huge national scandal, and the neiborhood was abandoned, until the early 90s when the clean up was finally completed.  New homes were constructed on concrete slabs (no basements).  The land that was deemed unusable due to being too contaminated is now surrounded by a large fence to keep people from wandering on to the sight. The sad part, is eventhough, the neighborhood is making a comeback, its reputation will forever be tarnished by that scandel.

LindaClement
by Linda on Jul. 19, 2013 at 12:03 AM
1 mom liked this

I suspect the reasons are related: the super-cheap property is bought by unsuspecting developers from sellors who know why it's cheap but aren't saying... no one in the planning department knows any reason to suspect anything, so permits are forthcoming with ease... people buy in because it's new (everyone likes to mess up a house with no history!) and underpriced (because of the cheap land.)

Ta da: toxic waste in large developments...

Sisteract
by Whoopie on Jul. 19, 2013 at 12:49 AM
1 mom liked this

We built a home once (well a contractor built it), and a new home was actually too much pressure. There were no pictures on the walls of that home for a good, long time- I did not want to mare those walls. Every dent was ours- Yikes.

Give me an older home any time.

Otherwise, I agree with your thoughts.

Quoting LindaClement:

I suspect the reasons are related: the super-cheap property is bought by unsuspecting developers from sellors who know why it's cheap but aren't saying... no one in the planning department knows any reason to suspect anything, so permits are forthcoming with ease... people buy in because it's new (everyone likes to mess up a house with no history!) and underpriced (because of the cheap land.)

Ta da: toxic waste in large developments...


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