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Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Unschooling: Education, or Abuse?

Posted by on Jul. 21, 2013 at 11:56 PM
  • 163 Replies



Unschooling
- An educational method/philosophy that rejects compulsory school as a primary means for learning.
- Unschoolers learn through life experiences.
- Such experiences include: Play, games, household chores, personal interest and curiosity.
- Other experiences include: Internships/work experience, travel, books, family, mentors/social interaction.
- Encourages exploration of activities initiated by children, believing the more personal the more meaningful.

While courses may be taken unschool questions:
- The usefulness of curricula
- The usefulness of grading methods
- The usefulness of traditional schooling in maximizing the education of each unique child.

Now, I've seen the Wife Swap episode with this family recently.
The children couldn't read or write properly for their ages (failing to read very simple words).

What's your take on all of this?
Do you consider it a new take on education, or a form of abuse?

by on Jul. 21, 2013 at 11:56 PM
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Replies (1-10):
SouthernMamaof1
by on Jul. 21, 2013 at 11:59 PM
3 moms liked this

 I don't see unschooling as abuse or neglect as long as the child is learning.  If a child is behind due to unschooling, I see it as irresponsible on the part of the parent.  Not ALL children learn the same way.  That applies to unschooling also.  Not all children are going to learn through unschooling.

 

Teaching~"Once you master the art of facing a room full of teenagers, and come out alive, you can do ANYTHING."


stormcris
by Christy on Jul. 22, 2013 at 12:01 AM
3 moms liked this

It depends on the people doing it. In some cases it works very well especially for some children who cannot focus on topics they find boring. The fact that they could not read or write for their ages is not that uncommon. Children in various schools cannot do it either. Although people base many things on some ideal milestone not every child progresses according to the set standard. Some very smart individuals had considerable trouble with reading and writing. Unschooling is more inline with the way you teach any child before school if they ask questions you discuss and teach. Not all parents have a mindset to do these things. You have to take oppertunities for learning, it is not merely mindless abstract leave them to their own devices.

collectivecow
by Gold Member on Jul. 22, 2013 at 12:02 AM

The woman who is currently spear-heading the movement has children who can't read and do simple arithmetic, yet she has no problem reading. I find that to be a sour contradiction.

Quoting SouthernMamaof1:

I don't see unschooling as abuse or neglect as long as the child is learning.  If a child is behind due to unschooling, I see it as irresponsible on the part of the parent.  Not ALL children learn the same way.  That applies to unschooling also.  Not all children are going to learn through unschooling.


collectivecow
by Gold Member on Jul. 22, 2013 at 12:05 AM

Except that when children have issues with reading/writing, they also have resources to help them overcome such issues. My daughter has a speech impediment, and sees a speech therapist three times a week and during school, which helped tremendously. 

How can we be aware that the child has a difficulty with progressing through curricula, if a child isn't taught it to begin with?

Quoting stormcris:

It depends on the people doing it. In some cases it works very well especially for some children who cannot focus on topics they find boring. The fact that they could not read or write for their ages is not that uncommon. Children in various schools cannot do it either. Although people base many things on some ideal milestone not every child progresses according to the set standard. Some very smart individuals had considerable trouble with reading and writing. Unschooling is more inline with the way you teach any child before school if they ask questions you discuss and teach. Not all parents have a mindset to do these things. You have to take oppertunities for learning, it is not merely mindless abstract leave them to their own devices.


glitterteaz
by Ruby Member on Jul. 22, 2013 at 12:08 AM

I think it is a form of neglect if they are not learnng at least the basic needs of an education

NWP
by guerrilla girl on Jul. 22, 2013 at 12:16 AM
2 moms liked this

Not every method is for every child. Unschooling is one end of one of the spectrum and would work for some kids....

That said, It takes very educated people to pull off unschooling successfully.

LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Jul. 22, 2013 at 12:51 AM
3 moms liked this

I'm going to go with 'abuse.'

It's how I educated my kids... :D

LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Jul. 22, 2013 at 12:53 AM
4 moms liked this

I think the same thing can be said of the many children pushed through the school system who aren't actually learning anything.

Strangely, it's more often the graduates my children have worked with who can't figure out how to find out how to do percent calculations with or without a calculator...

Quoting glitterteaz:

I think it is a form of neglect if they are not learnng at least the basic needs of an education


LindaClement
by Thatwoman on Jul. 22, 2013 at 12:53 AM

There's a woman spearheading this movement?

John Holt died almost 25 years ago --he coined the term.

Quoting collectivecow:

The woman who is currently spear-heading the movement has children who can't read and do simple arithmetic, yet she has no problem reading. I find that to be a sour contradiction.

Quoting SouthernMamaof1:

I don't see unschooling as abuse or neglect as long as the child is learning.  If a child is behind due to unschooling, I see it as irresponsible on the part of the parent.  Not ALL children learn the same way.  That applies to unschooling also.  Not all children are going to learn through unschooling.



collectivecow
by Gold Member on Jul. 22, 2013 at 12:56 AM

Yes, I know he did, but apparently the woman from Wife Swap is the one currently promoting the movement itself (from what I understand). While I can see there is a great value to this style of education, I'm also a bit iffy about the extent that she has gone through in order to unschool her children.

In the Wife Swap episode her almost teenage son couldn't read basic words on a dish washer, which really makes me question whether she's actually unschooling or deciding to not school in any form (if that makes sense).

I am very into a modest parenting style that tries to promote my child's wants and needs, but I do think that subjects like algebra can become especially important (for example, if the child wanted to work with programming or engineering in the future).

Quoting LindaClement:

There's a woman spearheading this movement?

John Holt died almost 25 years ago --he coined the term.

Quoting collectivecow:

The woman who is currently spear-heading the movement has children who can't read and do simple arithmetic, yet she has no problem reading. I find that to be a sour contradiction.

Quoting SouthernMamaof1:

I don't see unschooling as abuse or neglect as long as the child is learning.  If a child is behind due to unschooling, I see it as irresponsible on the part of the parent.  Not ALL children learn the same way.  That applies to unschooling also.  Not all children are going to learn through unschooling.


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