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Measles Races Through Anti-Vax Haven

Posted by on Jul. 23, 2013 at 10:41 AM
  • 116 Replies

http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/36640/title/Measles-Races-Through-Anti-Vax-Haven/

In the late 1990s, many Welsh parents heeded the warnings of former researcher Andrew Wakefield, who published a now-retracted study in 1998 that linked the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine to autism. Fifteen years later, even after the paper was found to be plagued with ethical problems and conflicts of interest, many parents still refuse the vaccine for their children, and a measles outbreak is now racing through Southwest Wales, according to The Wall Street Journal. More than 1,200 people have become infected by the virus that causes measles between November 2012 and this month.

Dai Lloyd is a doctor in Wales who has been treating many of the recent cases. “Despite the fact that it’s one of the greatest health measures ever invented by man or woman, there seems to still be a small residue of humanity that objects to the very idea of immunization,” Lloyd told WSJ. “If you go around the cemetery you can see the historical evidence of childhood slaughter from pre-immunization days.”

England, like the U.S., was poised to declare measles—a highly contagious disease that cause pneumonia, deafness, and, in roughly one out of 1,000 cases, death—“eliminated.” But the U.K. has now reported more than 1,100 cases in 2013 through May, a 64 percent increase from the same months in 2012. “It’s very galling we had measles eliminated and now we’ve got it again,” Paul Cosford, medical director of Public Health England, told WSJ.

by on Jul. 23, 2013 at 10:41 AM
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Replies (1-10):
fireangel5
by Gold Member on Jul. 23, 2013 at 11:07 AM
3 moms liked this

There is a lot making resurgence. Just updated my youngests vax record for college. They are  requiring full set of MMR, meningitis of course, and dTAP within the last 10 years. I don't think I had to get my oldest (by 2.5 years) a pertussis booster or diptheria. The NP was also discussing the Hep A vax. Some scary stuff. As horrible  and destructiive as humans are to each other, those little viruses and bacteria can do far more damage imo. 

romalove
by Roma on Jul. 23, 2013 at 11:08 AM
1 mom liked this


Quoting fireangel5:

There is a lot making resurgence. Just updated my youngests vax record for college. They are  requiring full set of MMR, meningitis of course, and dTAP within the last 10 years. I don't think I had to get my oldest (by 2.5 years) a pertussis booster or diptheria. The NP was also discussing the Hep A vax. Some scary stuff. As horrible  and destructiive as humans are to each other, those little viruses and bacteria can do far more damage imo. 

I'm sure I'll be facing that next year when my daughter is ready to go to college (she'll be a senior in September).

People act on fear.  As long as they think the vaccines are more of a danger than the diseases, we'll see resurgence in disease, and the eradication of smallpox, which was such a triumphant moment, will not have another victory joining it any time soon.

fireangel5
by Gold Member on Jul. 23, 2013 at 11:27 AM
1 mom liked this

I have to agree. There is no real reason that I have found( so possibly I am wrong) to avoid those vaccines. Every year you hear of whopping cough epidemics. That is unnecessary.

I can understand parents being reluctant to jump on the bandwagon for brand new vax. No one really wants their kid to be a guinea pig, but MMR, polio, etc have been around forever. 

Quoting romalove:


Quoting fireangel5:

There is a lot making resurgence. Just updated my youngests vax record for college. They are  requiring full set of MMR, meningitis of course, and dTAP within the last 10 years. I don't think I had to get my oldest (by 2.5 years) a pertussis booster or diptheria. The NP was also discussing the Hep A vax. Some scary stuff. As horrible  and destructiive as humans are to each other, those little viruses and bacteria can do far more damage imo. 

I'm sure I'll be facing that next year when my daughter is ready to go to college (she'll be a senior in September).

People act on fear.  As long as they think the vaccines are more of a danger than the diseases, we'll see resurgence in disease, and the eradication of smallpox, which was such a triumphant moment, will not have another victory joining it any time soon.



romalove
by Roma on Jul. 23, 2013 at 11:28 AM
1 mom liked this


Quoting fireangel5:

I have to agree. There is no real reason that I have found( so possibly I am wrong) to avoid those vaccines. Every year you hear of whopping cough epidemics. That is unnecessary.

I can understand parents being reluctant to jump on the bandwagon for brand new vax. No one really wants their kid to be a guinea pig, but MMR, polio, etc have been around forever. 

Quoting romalove:


Quoting fireangel5:

There is a lot making resurgence. Just updated my youngests vax record for college. They are  requiring full set of MMR, meningitis of course, and dTAP within the last 10 years. I don't think I had to get my oldest (by 2.5 years) a pertussis booster or diptheria. The NP was also discussing the Hep A vax. Some scary stuff. As horrible  and destructiive as humans are to each other, those little viruses and bacteria can do far more damage imo. 

I'm sure I'll be facing that next year when my daughter is ready to go to college (she'll be a senior in September).

People act on fear.  As long as they think the vaccines are more of a danger than the diseases, we'll see resurgence in disease, and the eradication of smallpox, which was such a triumphant moment, will not have another victory joining it any time soon.



I have not gotten my girls Gardasil because I am nervous about it.

Surprisingly, my younger daughter wants it, though.  She is 17 and says she thinks it's a good idea.

LilliesValley
by Bronze Member on Jul. 23, 2013 at 11:31 AM
4 moms liked this

 

I agree. People haven't had to bury enough children or have children with disabilities from these different diseases. Hopefully we'll swing back the other way and people will realize the need to vax, even if it's delayed it something. But it's sad a lot of kids are going to have to suffer in the process.

Quoting romalove:


Quoting fireangel5:

There is a lot making resurgence. Just updated my youngests vax record for college. They are  requiring full set of MMR, meningitis of course, and dTAP within the last 10 years. I don't think I had to get my oldest (by 2.5 years) a pertussis booster or diptheria. The NP was also discussing the Hep A vax. Some scary stuff. As horrible  and destructiive as humans are to each other, those little viruses and bacteria can do far more damage imo. 

I'm sure I'll be facing that next year when my daughter is ready to go to college (she'll be a senior in September).

People act on fear.  As long as they think the vaccines are more of a danger than the diseases, we'll see resurgence in disease, and the eradication of smallpox, which was such a triumphant moment, will not have another victory joining it any time soon.


 

diamondprnces
by Member on Jul. 23, 2013 at 11:32 AM


Was it really painful ? 

Quoting romalove:


Quoting fireangel5:

I have to agree. There is no real reason that I have found( so possibly I am wrong) to avoid those vaccines. Every year you hear of whopping cough epidemics. That is unnecessary.

I can understand parents being reluctant to jump on the bandwagon for brand new vax. No one really wants their kid to be a guinea pig, but MMR, polio, etc have been around forever. 

Quoting romalove:


Quoting fireangel5:

There is a lot making resurgence. Just updated my youngests vax record for college. They are  requiring full set of MMR, meningitis of course, and dTAP within the last 10 years. I don't think I had to get my oldest (by 2.5 years) a pertussis booster or diptheria. The NP was also discussing the Hep A vax. Some scary stuff. As horrible  and destructiive as humans are to each other, those little viruses and bacteria can do far more damage imo. 

I'm sure I'll be facing that next year when my daughter is ready to go to college (she'll be a senior in September).

People act on fear.  As long as they think the vaccines are more of a danger than the diseases, we'll see resurgence in disease, and the eradication of smallpox, which was such a triumphant moment, will not have another victory joining it any time soon.



I have not gotten my girls Gardasil because I am nervous about it.

Surprisingly, my younger daughter wants it, though.  She is 17 and says she thinks it's a good idea.



romalove
by Roma on Jul. 23, 2013 at 11:34 AM
2 moms liked this


Quoting LilliesValley:


I agree. People haven't had to bury enough children or have children with disabilities from these different diseases. Hopefully we'll swing back the other way and people will realize the need to vax, even if it's delayed it something. But it's sad a lot of kids are going to have to suffer in the process.

Quoting romalove:


Quoting fireangel5:

There is a lot making resurgence. Just updated my youngests vax record for college. They are  requiring full set of MMR, meningitis of course, and dTAP within the last 10 years. I don't think I had to get my oldest (by 2.5 years) a pertussis booster or diptheria. The NP was also discussing the Hep A vax. Some scary stuff. As horrible  and destructiive as humans are to each other, those little viruses and bacteria can do far more damage imo. 

I'm sure I'll be facing that next year when my daughter is ready to go to college (she'll be a senior in September).

People act on fear.  As long as they think the vaccines are more of a danger than the diseases, we'll see resurgence in disease, and the eradication of smallpox, which was such a triumphant moment, will not have another victory joining it any time soon.



Mia Farrow wrote a book after her break up with Woody Allen, some of it was about her life and of course a lot about her relationship with him and what happened when he fell in love with her daughter and betrayed her and the family (and her accusations of his molestation of the daughter they had together).

She had pictures of herself in an iron lung and being carried out of the hospital, she was a polio victim when she was a child.

I bring this up because most people know who Mia Farrow is, we're not talking about something that happened hundreds of years ago but as recently as the 1950's.

People have short memories.

romalove
by Roma on Jul. 23, 2013 at 11:34 AM


Quoting diamondprnces:


Was it really painful ? 

Quoting romalove:


Quoting fireangel5:

I have to agree. There is no real reason that I have found( so possibly I am wrong) to avoid those vaccines. Every year you hear of whopping cough epidemics. That is unnecessary.

I can understand parents being reluctant to jump on the bandwagon for brand new vax. No one really wants their kid to be a guinea pig, but MMR, polio, etc have been around forever. 

Quoting romalove:


Quoting fireangel5:

There is a lot making resurgence. Just updated my youngests vax record for college. They are  requiring full set of MMR, meningitis of course, and dTAP within the last 10 years. I don't think I had to get my oldest (by 2.5 years) a pertussis booster or diptheria. The NP was also discussing the Hep A vax. Some scary stuff. As horrible  and destructiive as humans are to each other, those little viruses and bacteria can do far more damage imo. 

I'm sure I'll be facing that next year when my daughter is ready to go to college (she'll be a senior in September).

People act on fear.  As long as they think the vaccines are more of a danger than the diseases, we'll see resurgence in disease, and the eradication of smallpox, which was such a triumphant moment, will not have another victory joining it any time soon.



I have not gotten my girls Gardasil because I am nervous about it.

Surprisingly, my younger daughter wants it, though.  She is 17 and says she thinks it's a good idea.



Was what painful?

JakeandEmmasMom
by Platinum Member on Jul. 23, 2013 at 11:47 AM

 Yikes!  That is not good.

fireangel5
by Gold Member on Jul. 23, 2013 at 11:48 AM

I had started to use Gardasil as an example but cut my answer short. 

I was/am against it being mandatory. However if parents/kids/adults want it, that's a different story. I have heard and read too many negative things about that vax. I warned my SIL about it when she was talking about it for her then 7 year old daughter. She argued with me and I basically said, ok, your kid, your decision. I would make a different choice for mine. She apparently has heard the same from many others and has now backed off her stance. 

i say if your daughter is interested, do some research with her. Make a pros/cons list. Talk to a few nurses/doctors if possible. I understand your concerns totally tho. 


Quoting romalove:


Quoting fireangel5:

I have to agree. There is no real reason that I have found( so possibly I am wrong) to avoid those vaccines. Every year you hear of whopping cough epidemics. That is unnecessary.

I can understand parents being reluctant to jump on the bandwagon for brand new vax. No one really wants their kid to be a guinea pig, but MMR, polio, etc have been around forever. 

Quoting romalove:


Quoting fireangel5:

There is a lot making resurgence. Just updated my youngests vax record for college. They are  requiring full set of MMR, meningitis of course, and dTAP within the last 10 years. I don't think I had to get my oldest (by 2.5 years) a pertussis booster or diptheria. The NP was also discussing the Hep A vax. Some scary stuff. As horrible  and destructiive as humans are to each other, those little viruses and bacteria can do far more damage imo. 

I'm sure I'll be facing that next year when my daughter is ready to go to college (she'll be a senior in September).

People act on fear.  As long as they think the vaccines are more of a danger than the diseases, we'll see resurgence in disease, and the eradication of smallpox, which was such a triumphant moment, will not have another victory joining it any time soon.



I have not gotten my girls Gardasil because I am nervous about it.

Surprisingly, my younger daughter wants it, though.  She is 17 and says she thinks it's a good idea.



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