Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Current Events & Hot Topics Current Events & Hot Topics

Why America Is Severely Broken

Posted by on Jul. 29, 2013 at 9:15 AM
  • 186 Replies
10 moms liked this


How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


by on Jul. 29, 2013 at 9:15 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
LNLMommy
by Queen K on Jul. 29, 2013 at 12:48 PM
4 moms liked this

 Bump! I agree but getting the top3% to give up even a small fraction of their wealth will never happen. And the policy makers are too busy trying to stay in their good graces so there is no one to make it happen.

ReadWriteLuv
by Silver Member on Jul. 29, 2013 at 12:53 PM
12 moms liked this

I remember when Walmart was a reputable, all-American company that was proud to sell mostly quality, made in the USA products. That was their marketing tagline. Since Sam Walton died, his children have completely changed his company and tarnished it's reputation. Anyone else watch the documentary The High Cost of Low Prices? The surviving Waltons are awful people.

Wherever Mr. Walton is in the ether, I'm sure he's shaking his head in disgust. Or not. His family is taken care of for generations to come. 

Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Jul. 29, 2013 at 2:04 PM
2 moms liked this

For balance:

(source)

As the art world must know, Alice Walton has become a punching bag for people who are really bashing Wal-Mart, largely for the wages it pays its employees and the benefits it does or does not provide. Another strain of criticism pokes at her for spending money on an art museum. Jeff Goldberg, writing for Bloomberg, recently called the Crystal Bridges Museum of Art “a moral tragedy” and “a compelling symbol of the chasm between the richest Americans and everyone else.”

As if art were of no use or inspiration to anyone but “the rich.”

I initially tried to ignore this — except in the first paragraph of my review of Crystal Bridges, in which I said the wages link was “a confusion of apples and oranges if ever there was one.” (In my review, I savor the Robert Henri portrait, of Jessica Penn, at left, and I thought I’d show it to RCA readers.)

But Goldberg has now taken as second gun to Walton and Cystal Bridges. (Read Goldberg, if you must, here and here.)

This strikes me as a case of nothing succeeding like success and excess. Goldberg received a lot of attention for the first column, after all.

Fortunately, Ira Stoll, the former managing editor of the New York Sun — which you will recall had some pretty wonderful cultural stories — has fired back. Stoll has a website called Future of Capitalism, and yesterday he began a post saying “Remind me if I ever get rich not to start an art museum. It seems to be just an invitation for attacks from the press.”

Stoll then lists eight points in Walton’s defense, the most pertinent of which are these:

Why focus solely on her at the expense of many other rich people who fund charities in which they are interested while making money in low-wage, low health-insurance businesses? Joan Kroc, whose fortune comes from McDonald’s, gave $200 million to National Public Radio. McDonald’s treats its workers about the same as Walmart, but I haven’t seen Jeff Goldberg agitating about the moral blight of Morning Edition. Jeff Goldberg also complains about the aesthetics of Walmart stores, but they look pretty much the same as a Home Depot, a Staples, a Lowe’s, or any other big-box store. Why single out Walmart?

And:

If Alice Walton decided voluntarily to pay Walmart workers higher wages and health benefits out of her share of the Walmart profits, it would probably be difficult to structure that without also adversely affecting the returns of the other shareholders. (I suppose one could establish a separate class of stock, but it’s hard to see the rationale for giving the family that founded and built the company a class of stock that carried a lower rate of return than that available to the general public or new shareholders.) Giving all the shareholders a newly lowered rate of return would increase Walmart’s cost of capital, making it harder for the company to compete with new competitors. Stores might have to close, and instead of low-wage, low-insurance jobs, there might be no jobs at all. And the existing shareholders, who bought their shares expecting the company would pay a market wage rather than the newly generous Goldberg above-market wage, would see the value of their shares drop. Since lots of those existing shares are held by middle-class or lower-middle class Americans through mutual funds or union or government pension funds, you’d wind up hurting some of the same people you are trying to help.

I suppose some “art-lovers” are still (inanely) angry with Walton for trying to buy good picture, “taking them way” from East coast cities.

But Goldberg is really attacking the foundation on which almost all American art museums are built, and it’s about time people start recognizing that — and speaking up in her defense.

Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Jul. 29, 2013 at 2:07 PM
Quoting survivorinohio:


The picture, by the way, is from when she was arrested for driving while intoxicated, in Texas.

(more info)

TranquilMind
by Platinum Member on Jul. 29, 2013 at 2:18 PM

 Well, she didn't create the situation. She is merely the one who has currently inherited the reins.  But yes, the inequities have not gone unnoticed. 

SherryBerry106
by on Jul. 29, 2013 at 2:25 PM
3 moms liked this

No, I am pretty sure that it is the parasites that are envious of anyone that has anything that they don't have, and keep voting for people who promise to take from the makers and give to the takers.

PeeperSqueak5
by on Jul. 29, 2013 at 2:28 PM

This this this !

and America has turned it's back on God.  We've got blood on our hands thru abortion and euthanizing disabled and the elderly.

Quoting SherryBerry106:

No, I am pretty sure that it is the parasites that are envious of anyone that has anything that they don't have, and keep voting for people who promise to take from the makers and give to the takers.


survivorinohio
by René on Jul. 29, 2013 at 2:37 PM
5 moms liked this

There is an issue when 47 % become parasites in the eyes of the balance :(

Quoting SherryBerry106:

No, I am pretty sure that it is the parasites that are envious of anyone that has anything that they don't have, and keep voting for people who promise to take from the makers and give to the takers.


How far you go in life depends on your being: tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving and tolerant of both the weak and strong.  Because someday in life you would have been one or all of these.  GeorgeWashingtonCarver


idunno1234
by Silver Member on Jul. 29, 2013 at 2:50 PM
9 moms liked this

 "Makers" like who, the Koch brothers?? 

And are you calling actually calling poor people parasites???

Here's something that is hopefully simple enough for you to understand regarding the widening gap between rich and poor in this country:

Separate but unequal: Charts show growing rich-poor gap:

The Great Recession and the slump that followed have triggered a jobs crisis that's been making headlines since before President Obama was in office, and that will likely be with us for years. But the American economy is also plagued by a less-noted, but just as serious, problem: Simply put, over the last 30 years, the gap between rich and poor has widened into a chasm.

Here are three samples:

• This chart shows that the poorest 90 percent of Americans make an average of $31,244 a year, while the top 1 percent make over $1.1 million:

• According to this chart, most income groups have barely grown richer since 1979. But the top 1 percent has seen its income nearly quadruple:

• And this chart suggests most Americans have little idea of just how unequal income distribution is. And that they'd like things to be divvied up a lot more equitably:

Chart showing US attitudes on wealth inequality

 

 

Quoting SherryBerry106:

No, I am pretty sure that it is the parasites that are envious of anyone that has anything that they don't have, and keep voting for people who promise to take from the makers and give to the takers.

 

 

momtoscott
by Platinum Member on Jul. 29, 2013 at 3:00 PM

I agree, it's sickening.  Probably going to get worse before it's going to get better.  

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)