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Fake Service Dogs

Posted by on Aug. 5, 2013 at 10:56 AM
  • 35 Replies

I remember a post recently about someone being cranky about the number of service dogs in her restaurant and how you can't ask them to PROVE they're really service dogs because its against the law because of privacy issues. 

Do we need to start making people  prove it or is this fakery just part of what's acceptable?

New Yorkers use bogus 'therapy dog' tags to take Fido everywhere

NYers’ bogus service tags

Phony “service dog” tags have become common among city pooch owners, who use them for everything from taking Fido bar-hopping to pick up chicks to getting discounts on the Hamptons Jitney.

Dog owners can easily snap up bogus tags, vests, patches and certificates on the Internet, circumventing the city Health Department and undermining federal regulations designed to aid the disabled.

“I was sick of tying up my dog outside,” said Brett David, 33, a restaurateur whose tiny pooch, Napoleon, wore an unofficial “therapy dog” patch during a visit to Whole Foods on Houston Street (pictured).

Photos: Gabriella Bass

“Sometimes, they’ll give me a hassle and say bring the papers next time, but for five bucks, you order [a patch] off eBay, and it works 90 percent of the time,” he told The Post.

The Health Department issues legitimate service-dog tags but doesn’t regulate them.

To obtain a legitimate tag, an applicant only needs to present a letter from a dog trainer saying the dog can perform certain useful tasks. Proof of a disability isn’t required.

David merely had to say “service dog” at a Starbucks on Delancey Street and again at a dumpling eatery on Broome Street for him and his furry friend to be allowed inside.

“He’s been to most movie theaters in the city, more nightclubs than most of my friends,” David boasted of Napoleon, a Maltese Yorkie.

“I don’t care who you are, a teacup Yorkie will trump a black [American Express] card when you’re trying to pick up a girl.”

Financier Kate Vlasovskaya, 24, carries a phony “service dog” ID card she bought online from the “United States Service Dog Registry” for her Cavalier King Charles spaniel, Lila.

“It’s becoming pretty popular now,” she said as she recently carted Lila on the Hamptons Jitney without having to buy a ticket for the dog.

For $50, the laminated card, featuring a hologram, provides the dog with an ID number.

Vlasovskaya isn’t worried about getting called out, noting it’s a hassle to verify the certificate.

“You’d have to go through all of these links or get someone on the line,” she said. “With all of that effort, they will probably just let you in.”

Toni Eames, the blind president of the International Association of Assistance Dog Partners, said fake service pooches antagonize her Seeing-Eye dog.

“People don’t realize that if the dog misbehaves in any way — if it isn’t clean, barks or is overly friendly and jumps on people — that it aggravates other dogs and disrupts the way they do service,” she said.

Lori Levine, designer of the Comes With Baggage handbag line, got her dogs legitimate tags after paying $1,100 to have them trained. She got the tags so she could take the pets to visit a sick friend in the hospital but also brings the pooches along while dining out, shopping or traveling.

“You can tell when people are faking it,” she said. “Their dogs act crazy.”

 Sexy If its unladylike, fattening or fun, I'm in!
  

by on Aug. 5, 2013 at 10:56 AM
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Replies (1-10):
fireangel5
by Gold Member on Aug. 5, 2013 at 11:32 AM
2 moms liked this

Pathetic people with no regard for others. 

katy_kay08
by on Aug. 5, 2013 at 11:35 AM
6 moms liked this
Maybe the solution is to require special certification that is worn on the dog's halter. Certification is required to get a handicap placard for parking it should be required for service dogs as well.
mlg1989
by Bronze Member on Aug. 5, 2013 at 11:37 AM
Quoting katy_kay08:

Maybe the solution is to require special certification that is worn on the dog's halter. Certification is required to get a handicap placard for parking it should be required for service dogs as well.



This.

EireLass
by Ruby Member on Aug. 5, 2013 at 1:21 PM

Here we go again. A Therapy Dog is not the same as a Service Dog. A Therapy Dog does not have all the legal rights that a Service Dog has. If you were a business owner, this would be part of the laws of your business you should learn, and you can rightfully turn away "Therapy Dogs". It's a whole different type of training, there is a 15 part test that MUST be passed, and they do get certified. It is a much more generalized training than Service. A Service Dog goes through extensive training, and then very personal training. There is no test, there is no certification.

My big guy passed away about a month ago, due to a splenic tumor :o(


FromAtoZ
by AllieCat on Aug. 5, 2013 at 1:33 PM

I do think proof should have to be provided if asked for.

happinessforyou
by Bronze Member on Aug. 5, 2013 at 2:15 PM

We were at a coffee shop last fall and a lady had a "therapy"dog-not a service dog. She needed it for her emotions... WTF??? I love dogs, but come on already!

Fairegirl33
by Member on Aug. 5, 2013 at 3:02 PM

 you know I agree with you to an extent...

 I know that my cat def makes me feel better... when Im down I can sit there and cry my eyes and and she will come up and lay with me and I def feel better.   Why I feel better I have no idea, maybe it is just the plain fact that I have something else that is living and breathing there to sit next to me during my time of "need".

 Also, if my DH are in a fight... we barely have to raise our voice and she is there meowing and up in one of our laps.

 BUT, does this mean she should come to work with me ?  Should I bring her to dinner with me to Red Lobster ?   Maybe, shopping at Home Depot ?  I don't think so... but I also don't suffer from extreme disorderes like some do.

 This is def a tough one IMO

Quoting happinessforyou:

We were at a coffee shop last fall and a lady had a "therapy"dog-not a service dog. She needed it for her emotions... WTF??? I love dogs, but come on already!

 

purpleducky
by Silver Member on Aug. 5, 2013 at 3:05 PM

So you know a lot about service dogs? I am trying to get more info about them so if you do, may I message you?

Quoting EireLass:

Here we go again. A Therapy Dog is not the same as a Service Dog. A Therapy Dog does not have all the legal rights that a Service Dog has. If you were a business owner, this would be part of the laws of your business you should learn, and you can rightfully turn away "Therapy Dogs". It's a whole different type of training, there is a 15 part test that MUST be passed, and they do get certified. It is a much more generalized training than Service. A Service Dog goes through extensive training, and then very personal training. There is no test, there is no certification.

My big guy passed away about a month ago, due to a splenic tumor :o(



EireLass
by Ruby Member on Aug. 5, 2013 at 3:07 PM

Sure!

Quoting purpleducky:

So you know a lot about service dogs? I am trying to get more info about them so if you do, may I message you?

Quoting EireLass:

Here we go again. A Therapy Dog is not the same as a Service Dog. A Therapy Dog does not have all the legal rights that a Service Dog has. If you were a business owner, this would be part of the laws of your business you should learn, and you can rightfully turn away "Therapy Dogs". It's a whole different type of training, there is a 15 part test that MUST be passed, and they do get certified. It is a much more generalized training than Service. A Service Dog goes through extensive training, and then very personal training. There is no test, there is no certification.

My big guy passed away about a month ago, due to a splenic tumor :o(


EireLass
by Ruby Member on Aug. 5, 2013 at 3:09 PM

A 'therapy dog' serves someone else (typically strangers....which is why they have to be tested and certified). A 'service dog' serves the handler. People can be disabled due to emotional disorders. A service dog would help them.

Quoting happinessforyou:

We were at a coffee shop last fall and a lady had a "therapy"dog-not a service dog. She needed it for her emotions... WTF??? I love dogs, but come on already!


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