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Is it unpatriotic to question capitalism as it exists today in the US??

Posted by on Aug. 16, 2013 at 12:09 PM
  • 122 Replies

Obviously there is a lot of concern in our country today regarding our political system and how it has been corrupted and abused at the expense of the American populace.

Capitalism itself has its critics, especially these days and although I personally believe that a capitalist based system is the best, I think that our economy needs fresh ideas, thinking that is outside the box.

Anyone who has dared to challenge our current economic system has been branded communist, socialist....just downright unpatriotic.

I'm thinking that its unpatriotic to refuse to recognize the very real problems inherent in our current economic system as well as our political system and that this country needs an entire overhaul with partisan politics not ruining any part of it- rather common sense and open mindedness as to how to get ourselves back on track-  if it is even still possible.

I thought this was interesting because it brings a debate out in the open that should have been ongoing rather looked upon as a national sacrosanct religion of capitalism:

 

Companies & Industries

‘Capitalism in Question’ at Annual Meeting of Management Profs

August 06, 2013
 
“Capitalism in Question” sounds like a consciousness-raising session from Occupy Wall Street. But it also happens to be the theme of this year’s annual meeting of the Academy of Management, an association of management professors with more than 19,000 members in over 100 countries. It’s happening on Aug. 9-13 at Walt Disney World in Florida.

Readers are left to draw their own conclusions about whether the questioning of capitalism is a sign that management professors have been infected by the liberalism of their colleagues from the philosophy and sociology departments, or whether capitalism has performed so poorly lately that even the people who teach it for a living are asking hard questions.

Whatever the case, the call for submissions of papers is provocative:

“The recent economic and financial crises, austerity, and unemployment, and the emergence of many economic, social, and environmental protest movements around the world have put back on the agenda some big questions about this vision: What kind of economic system would this better world be built on? Would it be a capitalist one? If so, what kind of capitalism? If not, what are the alternatives?”

Some of the session titles:

• Making Space for Indigenous Worldviews: from Received Economic Hegemony to Diverse Ways of Knowing

• Cross-National Capitalism in Question

• Is Postcapitalist Organization and Management Possible? Some Answers to Matters of Concern

• Capitalism in Question: Towards an Economics of Justice, Sustainability, and Economic Thrivability

• Capitalism in Crisis and Other Conundrums: Tackling the Big Questions

Gar Alperovitz, a left-leaning professor of political economy at the University of Maryland, was invited to give a keynote address. In a blog post he said he was “a bit taken aback” but pleased by the invitation. He wrote that the conference’s request for submissions “outlines the kind of sophisticated research agenda we’ll need if we’re serious about building something over time beyond the traditional systemic capitalist model.”

“Amazing how strong is the critique of capitalism they have produced for this event,” Alperovitz wrote in an e-mail.

Paul Adler, who chose the theme of this year’s conference in his role as program chairman, is a professor of management and organization at the University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business. He was educated in Australia and France and was previously affiliated with the Brookings Institution, Columbia University, Harvard Business School, and Stanford’s School of Engineering.

Adler wrote in an e-mail that “my colleagues on the Executive Committee and Board have been very supportive.” He added: “Of course, we all have different ideas about what the term ‘capitalism’ refers to and what exactly is or should be in question about it. … But there is a real eagerness among my colleagues to consider these ‘broader’ issues and how they should be reflected in our research and teaching.”

by on Aug. 16, 2013 at 12:09 PM
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Replies (1-10):
TimetoMomUp
by Runt on Aug. 16, 2013 at 12:10 PM
14 moms liked this

I don't think it is unpatriotic to question anything.  I think it is unpatriotic to try and shut those up who wish to question.  

Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Aug. 16, 2013 at 12:15 PM
1 mom liked this
Quoting idunno1234:

What kind of economic system would this better world be built on? Would it be a capitalist one? If so, what kind of capitalism? If not, what are the alternatives?

I think those would be more interesting questions to discuss, than whether or not it is patriotic to discuss them.


idunno1234
by Silver Member on Aug. 16, 2013 at 12:28 PM

 I agree with you.

  The reason I worded it that way is because I was watching an interview on public tv last night( i believe it was Bill Moyer and I'm ashamed to say I forgot who he was interviewing) and the dude was talking about the fallout of criticizing capitalism, that our society almost considers it heresy.  He took it upon himself over the years to study the criticisms of capitalism and he said it opened up his world, entirely changed his perspective to one that was perhaps more accurate and that he would never forgive his college economic professors for not including criticisms of capitalism in their curriculum although he understood it because its still, oddly enough, considered unpatriotic.

And wow....that was a pretty bad run on sentence but I'm too lazy to change it :)

I am no economic expert by a long shot but I would love to see an educated discussion on capitalism, the things that are good, the things that are bad and possible alternatives to the current system we have now because its beyond broken.


Quoting Clairwil:

Quoting idunno1234:

What kind of economic system would this better world be built on? Would it be a capitalist one? If so, what kind of capitalism? If not, what are the alternatives?

I think those would be more interesting questions to discuss, than whether or not it is patriotic to discuss them.

 


 

Clairwil
by Ruby Member on Aug. 16, 2013 at 1:01 PM
Quoting idunno1234:

the dude was talking about the fallout of criticizing capitalism, that our society almost considers it heresy.

I think it is because the phrase "criticizing capitalism" has two possible meaning or interpretations.

Some take it to mean "criticizing some aspects of capitalism, or some details of how it is currently implemented in the USA"

others take it to mean "rejecting all parts of capitalism, and thereby advocating some entirely non-capitalist system such as pure socialism or pure anarchy".

It doesn't help that people are mixing up systems of economics and systems of state governance.  As China has shown, you can be capitalist when it comes to economics, while being totalitarian in government style.


idunno1234
by Silver Member on Aug. 16, 2013 at 1:29 PM
1 mom liked this

 I think the fact that we have a global economy which is subject to countless things most of which we can't even begin to predict or control means that we need a common sense yet flexible system which does not prioritize need based on who has money and therefore power but on what makes sense for our economy's health as a whole.

It know that what I just wrote is an ideal.  Who knows how realistic it is but I think self-criticism is a no brainer when something is obviously waaaaaay off and the status quo isn't working. 

I believe that people who criticize capitalism are automatically branded communists or socialists causing people to be reluctant to openly and critically look at how we do things. 


Quoting Clairwil:

Quoting idunno1234:

the dude was talking about the fallout of criticizing capitalism, that our society almost considers it heresy.

I think it is because the phrase "criticizing capitalism" has two possible meaning or interpretations.

Some take it to mean "criticizing some aspects of capitalism, or some details of how it is currently implemented in the USA"

others take it to mean "rejecting all parts of capitalism, and thereby advocating some entirely non-capitalist system such as pure socialism or pure anarchy".

It doesn't help that people are mixing up systems of economics and systems of state governance.  As China has shown, you can be capitalist when it comes to economics, while being totalitarian in government style.

 


 

idunno1234
by Silver Member on Aug. 16, 2013 at 7:47 PM

BUMP!

idunno1234
by Silver Member on Aug. 16, 2013 at 7:48 PM

BUMP!

idunno1234
by Silver Member on Aug. 17, 2013 at 8:31 AM

BUMP!

Carpy
by Ruby Member on Aug. 17, 2013 at 8:40 AM
2 moms liked this

Capitalism doesn't exist in our country today.

Carpy
by Ruby Member on Aug. 17, 2013 at 8:42 AM
2 moms liked this

And how long to you think those two can actually survive in China?  One will die off.

Quoting Clairwil:

Quoting idunno1234:

the dude was talking about the fallout of criticizing capitalism, that our society almost considers it heresy.

I think it is because the phrase "criticizing capitalism" has two possible meaning or interpretations.

Some take it to mean "criticizing some aspects of capitalism, or some details of how it is currently implemented in the USA"

others take it to mean "rejecting all parts of capitalism, and thereby advocating some entirely non-capitalist system such as pure socialism or pure anarchy".

It doesn't help that people are mixing up systems of economics and systems of state governance.  As China has shown, you can be capitalist when it comes to economics, while being totalitarian in government style.



Minnow Slayer

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